Curriculum

Paul Goldenberg

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Paul Goldenberg

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Paul

Last name: 

Goldenberg

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E. Paul Goldenberg has an exceptionally strong background in K–12 mathematics, extensive knowledge of the cognitive bases of mathematics learning, and over 40 years of experience in curriculum development at both elementary and secondary levels, teaching, research, and professional development. He has taught from Grade 2 through high school mathematics and computer science, as well as graduate school mathematics and psychology for education. He brings particular knowledge and expertise to curriculum development, which is his major focus at EDC. Recent primary authorships include two books: Making Sense of Algebra: Developing Students’ Mathematical Habits of Mind coauthored with June Mark, Jane Kang, Mary Fries, Cindy Carter, and Tracy Cordner (2015, Heinemann), and Developing Essential Understanding of Geometry and Measurement for PreK–Grade2, coauthored with Douglas Clements (2014, NCTM).

Goldenberg has served as Principal Investigator (PI) on a wide range of projects that foster a love of and enthusiasm for mathematics in learners from early childhood through adulthood. He, Al Cuoco, and June Mark have championed the use of mathematical habits of mind—now aggregated within the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice—as organizers of curriculum since their initial paper written in the early 1990s. One such curriculum is Transition to Algebra, the product of a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded R&D project that he co-led with Mark. This full year algebra curriculum was originally designed to support at-risk students and their teachers, and is now used equally to support and accelerate students in middle school. Goldenberg is also Co–PI for Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards, a project focused on professional development for teachers, and iPuzzle, a technology project that has developed apps (SolveMe Puzzles) based on puzzles used in Transition to Algebra. He is also PI, along with Mark and Cuoco, of BJC4NYC—an NSF Math and Science Partnership (MSP), a collaboration with UC Berkeley and the New York City Department of Education to broaden participation in computer science in the NYC public high schools.

Earlier at EDC, Goldenberg developed a K–5 comprehensive mathematics curriculum—now published as Think Math!—which supports teachers' professional development while they teach by building and feeding their interest in and curiosity about mathematics. This work was inspired by the classic Math Workshop curriculum, which, back in 1964, intertwined skill-building calculations with big ideas and deep understanding in a way that fully reflects today’s Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice, specifically standards 7 and 8. Though published before Common Core, Think Math drew its principles from the same sources that led to much of the Common Core, in particular the Practice standards.

Goldenberg received a BA in Psychology from Brandeis University and an EdM in Elementary Education and a PhD in Curriculum and Supervision from Harvard University.

 

 

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar/Advisor

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2513

Deborah Spencer

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Deborah Spencer

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Deborah

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Spencer

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Deborah Spencer’s career is distinguished by her drive to help teachers and administrators make thoughtful, informed decisions about mathematics curriculum and instruction. She brings extensive expertise in research and development in mathematics curricula, instructional design for professional learning, and teacher leadership in mathematics. She has a particular interest in standards-based mathematics curricula and has partnered with school districts, curriculum developers, and researchers to strengthen implementation efforts across the country.

Spencer and colleagues June Mark and Paul Goldenberg of EDC, and Laura O’Dwyer of Boston College, are co-principal investigators (PIs) for the NSF-funded study, Supporting Success in Algebra: A Study of the Implementation of Transition to Algebra, which is working with 70 schools across the country to look at the effects of an innovative course designed to support students at risk of failure in algebra.

Spencer is also currently the co-PI, with June Mark, of a large-scale study investigating the effects of a district-level improvement strategy centered on use of high-quality materials in 153 elementary schools by over 2000 teachers. Emerging results suggest a potential effect of well-supported interventions on student outcomes; schools with higher levels of support from districts on average had students who grew significantly more in 4th-grade math scores than schools with less support, even controlling for percentage of low-income students.

As co-PI of Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards, Spencer leads research and dissemination efforts for a project that is developing engaging online professional learning resources and a professional development curriculum for Grades 5–10 teachers to clarify the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP). Her team has field-tested the professional development with over 400 teachers, and pilot studies found promising results.

Spencer is also the co-PI for the iPuzzle project, which is developing engaging digital puzzles that build foundational ideas in algebra and are designed to influence student engagement, perseverance, and logical thinking. Dubbed “Solve Me Puzzles,” the collection includes SolveMe Mobiles, Who am I?, and MysteryGrid apps. SolveMe Mobiles is available for free download in the iTunes App Store and won “Best in Category” for Digital Media at the 2015 New England Book Show.

As a senior advisor to preschool projects, Spencer advances efforts to enhance young children's math learning and promote their school readiness and success. Currently, she is advising the Games for Young Mathematicians team in developing and researching a professional development program that shows Head Start teachers how to play fun, appropriate, and challenging math games with children, and gives them skills to scaffold children's persistence and support their growth mindset. She is also advising a related family engagement project funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation that is developing resources based on Games for Young Mathematicians for parents.

Previously, with June Mark, Spencer directed the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded K–12 Mathematics Curriculum Center (1997–2004), which provided resources on standards-based instructional materials, helping teachers and administrators make thoughtful, informed decisions about mathematics curriculum and instructional materials. The Center had extensive reach, serving 1,600 schools and 600 districts from all 50 states, and offering seminars to over 2,200 participants.

Spencer is coauthor of "Curriculum Leadership in Selecting Mathematics Instructional Materials" (NCSM Journal); "How Do Districts Choose Mathematics Textbooks?”; Mathematics Assessment: Cases and Discussion Questions for Grades K–5Teacher Leadership in Mathematics and Science; From Counting to Calculus: Connecting Across Grades; Casebook on School ReformExploring Classroom Assessment: A Guide for Professional Developmentand Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment.

Spencer received an AB from Dartmouth College and an EdM from the Harvard Graduate School of Education with a concentration in administration, planning, and social policy.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2558

Deborah Schifter

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Deborah Schifter

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Deborah

Last name: 

Schifter

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Deborah Schifter is an expert in early algebra learning and mathematics education. She leads research, develops instructional resources, and designs professional development that helps teachers enhance their mathematics instruction and ensure students' mathematics proficiency. In 2017, Heineman will publish a book co-authored by Schifter, Virginia Bastable, and Susan Jo Russell—But Why Does it Work? Mathematical Argument in the Elementary Grades—that provides new insights drawn from their cutting-edge investigations of algebraic thinking at the elementary level.

Schifter is, with support from Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, working to update and revise the Developing Mathematical Ideas professional development series. To date, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics has republished two volumes in the series: Building A System of Tens and Making Meaning for Operations.

A sought-after keynote speaker on the topic of mathematics education, Schifter presented a session at the 2016 13th Annual International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME) in Hamburg, Germany. Following the ICME, she co-authored “Early Algebra: Research into its Nature, its Learning, its Teaching,” a volume in the ICME-13 Topical Surveys Series published by Springer. She regularly presents at the annual conferences of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Teacher Development Group, and the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Schifter authored Reconstructing Mathematics Education: Stories of Teachers Meeting the Challenge of Reform and edited a two-volume anthology of teachers’ writing, What’s Happening in Math Class? She is coauthor of the book Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra and of the elementary curriculum, Investigations in Number, Data, and Space. She is coeditor of A Research Companion to Principles and Standards for School Mathematics.

Schifter has been a member of the editorial board of Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education since 2001. She was a writer for the Mathematical Education of Teachers Project and has either chaired or been a member of numerous advisory committees for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the American Educational Research Association, and the National Science Foundation. She is a frequent collaborator with colleagues at TERC and The Mathematics Leadership Programs at Mount Holyoke College.

Schifter is an inaugural fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education. In 2012, she was selected to give the Judith E. Jacobs lecture at the annual meeting of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators. The American Educational Research Association awarded her its Professional Service Award, in 1996, and the Constructivist Research, Theory, and Practice Special Interest Group recognition for Significant Contribution to the Profession, in 1999.

Before joining EDC, Schifter taught elementary, secondary, and college-level mathematics and was an applied mathematician at the Naval Research Laboratory. In 1985, she began working for SummerMath for Teachers at Mount Holyoke College and directed that program from 1988 to 1993.

She received a BA from Saint John's College, Annapolis, an MA in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland, and an MS and PhD in psychology from the University of Massachusetts.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

26 Crescent Street
Northampton, MA 01060

Telephone: 

413-586-2993

Kevin Waterman

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Kevin Waterman

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Kevin

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Waterman

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Kevin Waterman brings significant expertise in instructional design, professional development, project management, and R&D. He specializes in the design and testing of innovation approaches to enhancing STEM education.

Waterman is a key member of several current EDC STEM initiatives, including: the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project “Broadening Participation of Elementary School Teachers and Students in Computer Science through STEM Integration and Statewide Collaboration.” In this STEM+C collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), EDC is developing a series of model curriculum units for grades 1-6 that integrate computational thinking into science and mathematics units. He is also the primary author of a middle school cybersecurity curriculum being developed for SAE, and is the mathematics and science subject matter expert in EDC's collaboration with Artists for Humanity on the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded STEAM Power project.

Previously, Waterman was a core writer on the NSF-funded CME Project, a four-year comprehensive high school mathematics program founded in problem-based, student-centered approaches to learning. He served as the editorial manager of the NSF-funded Linear Algebra and Geometry, a curriculum that teachers can use to challenge students who exhaust the mathematics offered by their school or that schools can build into their mathematics programs to provide an alternative to the typical sequence that ends with calculus. He also was a core writer on Developing Mathematical Practice in High School, a teacher professional development course funded by the Massachusetts DESE.

Waterman has led professional development seminars with teachers from the Boston Public Schools and with participants in Focus on Mathematics, an EDC-led partnership of teachers and mathematicians committed to increasing student achievement. He contributed “Mathematics Applied to Curriculum Development: Lessons Learned on the Job” for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 72nd Yearbook 2010.

Before joining EDC, he was Director of Product Marketing for HighPoint Systems and Principal Systems Engineer for Lotus Development Corp., working on knowledge management, news management, and computer-based training systems.

He received a BA in mathematics from Trinity College and an MAT in mathematics education from Boston University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2840

Eliza Fabillar

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Eliza Fabillar

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Eliza

Last name: 

Fabillar

Bio: 

Eliza P. Fabillar is an expert in high school reform, student-centered learning, systems change, professional development, and instructional design. She specializes in helping districts and high schools build capacity to bridge research and practice and develop systemic solutions to close opportunity gaps, prevent drop-out, improve academic achievement, and promote college and career success for all students.

Fabillar leads EDC's provision of technical assistance to the Nellie Mae Foundation's District Level Systems Change initiative. Drawing upon EDC's integrated conceptual model of technical assistance, she heads up a team that is guiding seven New England school districts in implementing systems change and continuous improvement strategies to create student-centered learning environments. Fabillar also served as lead facilitator and developer for The National Center on Scaling Up Effective Schools, in which capacity she worked with researchers and district teams to design, pilot, implement, and scale up innovations focused on increasing student ownership and responsibility for their academic learning.

A highly experienced instructional designer, Fabillar develops and co-develops engaging learning experiences for youth and adults that are in use nationwide. Recent curriculum and professional development projects include Law and Justice (L&J)Digital Media Arts, and Ford Next Generation Learning. These projects focus on preparing students for college and careers, empowering them to be active citizens in a democratic society, and building their critical thinking and literacy skills. Fabillar conducts professional development using effective curricula as a tool to help teachers implement inquiry- and problem-based instructional approaches to teaching and learning.

Nationwide, Fabillar has collaborated with a broad network of schools, districts, universities, state departments of education, and organizations including the Fort Worth Independent School District, Vanderbilt University, Hartford Public Schools, California Department of Education, and the National Career Academy Coalition.

Fabillar recently coauthored Revisiting the Core Elements of Our Capacity Building Framework for Scaling School Reforms: Lessons from the Field After Four Years of Work. Previously, she coauthored the paper, Designing Innovations for Implementation at Scale: An Emerging Framework for Increasing System Capacity, which was presented at the American Educational Research Association 2013 annual conference.

Before joining EDC, she was education Co-Director at the Center for Media and Learning/American Social History Project of the City University of New York, where she oversaw a number of local projects and served as a mentor for social studies and English language arts teachers at several high schools. She has taught adult education and graduate education courses.

Fabillar received a BA from City University of New York and an MA in cultural anthropology and education from Columbia University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2515

Cindy Hoisington

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Cynthia Hoisington

First name: 

Cindy

Last name: 

Hoisington

Bio: 

Cindy Hoisington believes that authentic, cognitively challenging science experiences can be transformative for young children and their teachers. She brings to her work more than 20 years of experience teaching young children, developing educational materials, and instructing and mentoring early childhood teachers in language, literacy, and science education.

At EDC, she focuses on instructing and mentoring preschool teachers in science education research projects, and she has contributed to the development of inquiry-based science curricula and mentoring protocols as well as to teacher, classroom, and child science assessments. Currently, she is part of EDC’s team working on a four-year, $3 million U.S. Department of Education Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) project, Literacy and Academic Success for English Learners through Science (LASErS). Her previous work was on the Cultivating Young Scientists (CYS) project funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. (Read blog posts by Hoisington about her work with the National Association for the Education of Young Children's (NAEYC) Early Childhood Science Interest Forum and combatting implicit bias in the STEM classroom.)

Hoisington has directed projects aimed at getting children and adults exploring outdoors together; helping teachers use educational television to facilitate science learning; and supporting low-literacy families to scaffold children’s language development through everyday science explorations. She has customized science trainings for the State of Maryland, Family Place Libraries, United Way of Miami-Dade, University of Northern Iowa, National Education Association, National Head Start Association, and the Iowa Department of Education, and collaborated with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

Hoisington also develops and advises on digital media initiatives aimed at promoting STEM for children, families, and teachers. She is currently part of EDC’s Ready to Learn team working with PBS. Previously she was the science advisor for the Emmy-winning educational television series Curious George, for which she received recognition from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. She has also developed online science materials for Peep and the Big Wide World and The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot about That!

Among other publications, Hoisington is the author of “Implicit bias in the STEM classroom; how to start tackling the biases that hold students back in STEM,” and “Picturing What’s Possible—Portraits of Science Inquiry in Early Childhood Classrooms;” and coauthor of “Gimme an E! Seven strategies for supporting the ‘E’ in young children’s STEM learning; Supporting children’s science learning through water explorations”; “Building a classroom community that supports English learners in preschool”;  "Foundations of Science Literacy:  Efficacy of a Preschool Professional Development Program in Science on Classroom Instruction, Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge, and Children's Observations and Predictions," “The Science and Mathematics of Building Structures,” “A Walk in the Woods: A Partnership with an Arboretum Gets Preschoolers Outside and into Science,” and "The Importance of Executive Function in Early Science Education."

Before joining EDC, she was a preschool teacher and education supervisor for ABCD Head Start in Boston, where she gained a deep appreciation for the complex challenges faced by children and families in poverty and the teachers who work with them.

Hoisington received a BS in biology from the University of Massachusetts and an MEd from Bridgewater State College. She has done post-graduate work in math and science education at University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2823

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