Equity

Farzeen Harunani

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Farzeen Harunani

First name: 

Farzeen

Last name: 

Harunani

Bio: 

Farzeen Harunani brings a fresh outlook on computer science (CS) education to her work at EDC. Harunani is committed to facilitating the expansion of CS education across the country and to seeking solutions to STEM equity issues for traditionally under-represented groups in the field.

As the Coordinator of District & Teacher Engagement the Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network (MassCAN), Harunani develops and assesses professional development efforts in the state to deliver high-quality computer science education to all teachers.

Previously, Harunani served as a mentor for the Girls Who Code program.  While a student at Marquette University, she proposed and founded a tutoring initiative for Upsilon Pi Epsilon, the computing honor society, to provide additional support to CS students outside of the classroom.

Harunani received a BS in Computer Engineering from Marquette University in 2015, and an MS in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell in 2016.

 

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Associate II

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2591

Regan Vidiksis

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Regan Vidiksis

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Regan

Last name: 

Vidiksis

Bio: 

Regan Vidiksis is an early education researcher with extensive experience in advancing effective strategies to promote children’s early science and mathematics learning and support teachers in integrating technology into early childhood settings in developmentally appropriate ways. She specializes in deepening understanding of effective, systematic approaches to improving teaching and learning, especially among underrepresented and underresourced teachers and families.

As a researcher and project manager for EDC’s evaluation of Ready to Learn, Vidiksis contributes to studies that measure children’s learning from literacy, math, and science public media learning resources and provide new insight into ways to enhance the school readiness of preschoolers in high-need communities.

Vidiksis serves as a researcher on the Next Generation Preschool Science project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). In the project, she is working with a team to develop, iteratively refine, and evaluate the promise of an innovative early science curriculum that promotes science practices, concepts, and discourse in preschool classrooms serving children from low-income backgrounds.

Currently, Vidiksis contributes to several other EDC STEM education initiatives. She is advancing the goals of IDEAS: Inventing, Designing, and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum, an NSF-funded project aiming to develop an Engineering Design program for middle school children on the autism spectrum and their general education peers. Vidiksis is also working on Monkeying Around, an NSF-funded initiative to design, produce, and research animated and live-action videos, along with parent-child engagement resources, that seek to build preschoolers’ computational thinking skills.

Vidiksis was named a 2014-2015 CADRE Fellow, for her work in NSF Discovery Research K-12 STEM research. She regularly presents her findings at the annual conferences of national organizations, including the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics and the National Head Start Association. She has also served as a proposal reviewer for the American Educational Research Association.

Before joining EDC, Vidiksis worked as a preschool special educator through the New York City Committee for Preschool Special Education and as a special instructor through the NYC Department of Health’s Early Intervention program, providing individualized services to young children and families in school, community, and home-based settings. She also worked as a special education evaluator for these agencies, conducting developmental assessments to assist in the determination of service qualification.  

Vidiksis received a BA in English Literature and Rhetoric from Binghamton University, and an MS in Early Child Education and Special Education from Hunter College.

 

 

 

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY  10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4229

Jill Neumayer DePiper

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Jill Neumayer DePiper

First name: 

Jill

Last name: 

Neumayer DePiper

Bio: 

Jill Neumayer DePiper researches mathematics learning and teaching, with a special focus on identifying effective strategies to support the academic success of students who are learning English. She brings extensive expertise in research design, instrumentation, and analysis.

Currently, Neumayer DePiper is contributing to initiatives targeted to deepen mathematics teachers’ understanding of effective instructional practices for students who are English learners. She is a senior research associate on Visual Access to Mathematics (VAM), a project focused on designing professional development for mathematics teachers of English learners to support them in their use of visual representations for mathematical problem-solving and specific language strategies to support their students.

In a previous project, Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Learners (MCSEL), Neumayer DePiper designed and created materials for coaches to use with middle-grades mathematics teachers to improve teacher knowledge about how to support the problem-solving and communication of students who are English learners. In the Fostering Mathematical Success of English Language Learners project, a collaboration with Horizon Research, Inc., her team sought to better understand how to prepare teachers to support English learners in engaging in rich geometry tasks.

Neumayer DePiper is the coauthor of two articles published in Journal for Research in Mathematics Education:  “Teacher Characteristics Associated with Mathematics Teachers’ Beliefs and Awareness of Their Students’ Mathematical Dispositions” and “The Relationship Between Teachers’ Mathematical Content and Pedagogical Knowledge, Teachers’ Perceptions, and Student Achievement.” She has also published on the topics of mathematics teacher identity and the challenges of teaching and learning with high-stakes accountability contexts.

Before joining EDC, Neumayer DePiper served as a researcher and instructor in the Center for Mathematics Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has provided professional development for teachers, including courses specifically focused on instruction for English learners.

Neumayer DePiper was a recipient of the the Mid-Atlantic Center for Mathematics Teaching and Learning doctoral fellowship, an NSF-funded award to increase the number of graduate students who become leaders in mathematics education.

She received a BA in Environmental Studies from Davidson College, an MAT from George Mason University, and a PhD in Education, Curriculum, and Instruction from the University of Maryland.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2191

Ginger Fitzhugh

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Ginger

Last name: 

Fitzhugh

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Ginger Fitzhugh leads evaluations that help programs leverage knowledge to achieve better outcomes for young people. She brings expertise in participatory program evaluation, systems thinking, and organizational development—as well as a commitment to identifying new strategies to advance educational access and equity, promote youth development, and foster school-community partnerships.

Fitzhugh leads a range of EDC evaluations that examine programs targeted to ensure all students receive strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educations, to enhance teacher professional development, and to improve informal and formal K–12 learning.

From 2014 to 2016, Fitzhugh served as Program Chair of the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) Systems in Evaluation Topical Interest Group. She has presented her findings at numerous AEA annual national conferences, and in 2009 she won AEA’s award for best poster presentation with Changing Horses Mid-Stream: Lessons Learned from Evaluator Transitions During Two ITEST STEM Projects. She is the author of several resources on challenges and successful strategies in conducting effective evaluations, including Survey Says? How to Visualize Survey Response Rates, Taking the Long View: Reframing Scale-Up and Sustainability Evaluations, and the EvaluATE blog post, “Show Me a Story: Using Data Visualization to Communicate Evaluation Findings.

Prior to joining EDC, Fitzhugh was a senior associate at Evaluation & Research Associates. Earlier in her career, she was a research associate at Brandeis University’s Center for Youth & Communities.

Fitzhugh received a BA in Psychology from Swarthmore College, attained an MM in Nonprofit Management and Evaluation from Brandeis University, and completed PhD coursework at Brandeis.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

206-395-4528

Ruth Rouvier

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Ruth Rouvier

First name: 

Ruth

Last name: 

Rouvier

Bio: 

Ruth Rouvier’s extensive expertise in documentation, maintenance, and revitalization of endangered languages informs her work connecting children's linguistic and cultural heritage to their early learning—an approach that has been shown to have positive effects on children’s academic success and well-being.

Currently, Rouvier is designing and leading a National Science Foundation-funded workshop that will engage experts in language acquisition, early childhood development, linguistics, statistics, and public health, in examining the impact of endangered language documentation on the learning and academic success of young children. Previously, she worked with EDC's National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness team and tribal communities to develop tools and resources, such as A Report on Tribal Language Revitalization in Head Start and Early Head Start, that support American Indian and Alaskan Native Head Start centers in planning and implementing language revitalization programs.

Rouvier is Vice President of the Board of Directors of the Pro-Moskitia Foundation of Nicaragua and serves on the Linguistic Society of America’s Committee on Endangered Languages and Their Preservation. She teaches courses in Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, conducts workshops in language documentation, presents her findings at the annual conferences of such organizations as the Linguistic Society of America, and shares her insights in publications such as The Washington Post

Rouvier is a Research Collaborator for the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. Before joining EDC, she was the program manager for the Smithsonian's Recovering Voices initiative. Earlier in her career, she was the language program coordinator for the Karuk Tribe.

She received a BA and MA in Linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

202-265-0843

Trisha O'Connell

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Trisha O'Connell

First name: 

Trisha

Last name: 

O'Connell

Bio: 

Trisha O’Connell has deep expertise in nonprofit development and management, portfolio building, and collective impact. She brings decades of experience in successful fundraising to her work to advance EDC’s goals to improve the quality and equity of education and promote the health and well-being of children, youth, and families.

In collaboration with the other members of the division’s leadership team, O’Connell plays a key role in furthering EDC’s mission to transform lives with learning. She researches and analyzes funding opportunities and trends in areas such as early childhood development and learning, afterschool, health and wellness, STEM education, and college and career readiness. Across content areas, O’Connell leads teams of researchers and experts in identifying and obtaining resources to expand and sustain R&D, evaluation, instructional design, professional development, and implementation support initiatives through federal, state, and private grants and contracts.

Before joining EDC, O’Connell served as Director of Research & Development for the WGBH National Center for Accessible Media, developing initiatives to research and address barriers facing people in disabilities in telecommunications and educational polices and practices. Earlier in her career, she played a key role in establishing the Women’s Technical Institute, the nation’s first technical school for adult women career changers.

O'Connell has authored several publications on the topic of accessibility, including: "Using Apple Technology to Support Learning for Students with Sensory and Learning Disabilities,” "e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities, A Joint ITU/G3ict Toolkit for Policy Makers Implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities," and the chapter "Universal Design in Media" in Universal Design Handbook 2nd Edition, ed. W.F.E. Preiser, K. H. Smith and E. Ostroff.

She holds an MBA from the Simmons College Graduate School of Management.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Development Director

Program: 

Learning and Teaching Division

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2342

Eden Badertscher

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Eden Badertscher

First name: 

Eden

Last name: 

Badertscher

Bio: 

Eden M. Badertscher works to close opportunity gaps in mathematics education and ensure our system of mathematics education is equitable and promotes the mathematics proficiency of all students. She brings extensive expertise in teacher education, mathematics curriculum and professional development, alignment with standards, and advancing effective mathematics instruction in urban school districts.

As the Principal Investigator of Designing for Equity by Thinking In and About Mathematics, Badertscher leads a team in supporting the use of effective strategies to close opportunity gaps for marginalized mathematics students by forming strong communities of mathematical practice that enage teachers, school and district leaders, and mathematicians as equal partners in change. Recently her team received a Fellowship from 100Kin10 in recognition of the importance and promise of this work.

In 2013, Badertscher co-authored the article “African American Mathematics Teachers as Agents in Their African American Students’ Mathematics Identity Formation” (Teachers College Record). She co-authored Chapter 22, “Learning to Learn Mathematics: Voices of Doctoral Students in Mathematics Education,” in the 69th Yearbook of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and was a Contributing Writer for the 2012 Pennsylvania Common Core Standards Grades 3–8. She has been a peer reviewer for the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education and the Journal of Research in Mathematics Education.

Badertscher regularly presents her work at the conferences of national organizations such as the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics.

Prior to joining EDC, Badertscher played a lead role in mathematics education reform initiatives in the Pittsburgh Public Schools and Prince George County Public Schools that were designed to support teachers, enhance instruction, and address district needs related to special education, culturally relevant teaching, and work with English language learners. She also taught at the undergraduate and graduate levels. While at the University of Maryland, she was involved in two primary research projects—Case Studies of Well-Respected Urban Algebra I Teachers and Thought Experiments in Mathematics Teaching (ThEMaT). Early in her career, she was a high school mathematics teacher.  

Badertscher has particular interests in the Philosophy of Mathematics, critical pedagogies and critical race theory, inequity perpetuated by the system of mathematics education, transforming teachers’ and students’ relationships with mathematics as well as identities of mathematics learners, and the teaching and learning of Calculus.

She received her BA from Princeton University and obtained her MEd and PhD from the University of Maryland. 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2906

Mary Fries

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Mary Fries

First name: 

Mary

Last name: 

Fries

Affiliation/Organization: 

EDC

Bio: 

Mary Fries, a highly skilled instructional designer and professional developer, brings expertise in mathematics education, including teaching, leadership, professional development, and curriculum planning and design. Her work reflects her commitment to designing resources and interventions that address “Mathematics Trauma” and seek to close opportunity gaps in mathematics education that serve to perpetuate racism.

Fries is a web and content developer and researcher on the Beauty and Joy of Computing project, which is adapting a University of California, Berkeley introductory computer science course into a high school AP Computer Science Principles course with the goal of helping diverse students enjoy and succeed at computer science. 

Fries is also the lead developer for the iPuzzle project, a two-year research and development initiative funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) that is creating apps for users to play, build, and share arithmetic and algebraic puzzles. The project’s first app is SolveMe Mobiles. She has also contributed to EDC’s Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards online resource for educators.

Recently, Fries coauthored EDC’s Transition to Algebra (TTA) curriculum published by Heinemann. TTA provides a full year of student and teacher materials that support struggling learners in enjoying and succeeding in algebra class. She is also the coauthor of Making Sense of Algebra: Developing Students' Mathematical Habits of Mind, a professional book that describes the teaching and learning principles espoused in TTA.  Fries provides TTA professional development for teachers around the country, and shares her work at the annual conferences of leading organizations such as the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

Before joining EDC, Fries served as the dean of mathematics, science, and technology at Windham High School in Windham, NH; as a board member and curriculum committee chair of the Academy for Science and Design Charter in Merrimack, NH; and as a member of the Windham Initiative for Renewable Energy.

Fries holds a BS in Mathematics through Mary Baldwin College’s Program for the Exceptionally Gifted, an MA in Philosophy and Religion from the California Institute of Integral Studies, and a CAGS in Mathematics Education from Boston University. 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2710

Babette Moeller

Email Babette Moeller

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First name: 

Babette

Last name: 

Moeller

Bio: 

Babette Moeller focuses on the development of and research on educational programs across the curriculum that help ensure elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students with disabilities are included in and benefit from educational reform efforts. As project director of numerous EDC R&D initiatives, she contributes her extensive experience designing and implementing technology-supported programs in general and special education, providing professional development for teachers and administrators in a variety of settings, and conducting formative and summative evaluation research.

Moeller is the Principal Investigator of an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study that is testing the impact of Math for All—a professional development program developed by EDC and Bank Street College of Education and published by Corwin Press—on teachers and students from Chicago Public Schools. Shown to have promise to positively affect teachers and students, Math for All prepares K–5 teachers to help students with diverse strengths and needs—including those with disabilities—achieve high-quality, standards-based learning outcomes in mathematics.

Recently, Moeller led a study of the impact of PBS LearningMedia on teachers' classroom practices, the quality of instruction, and student learning. Her team's findings indicate that PBS LearningMedia's digital content positively impacts student content knowledge and critical thinking practices when integrated into existing curriculum; teachers who participated in the study overwhelmingly reported that PBS LearningMedia made positive contributions to their classroom practices.

An active member of professional teacher organizations, Moeller represents EDC’s Center for Children and Technology within 100Kin10, a national network of organizations devoted to adding 100,000 more highly qualified STEM teachers to America’s classrooms by 2021. Moeller is also the Past President of Science Education for Students with Disabilities (SESD), a professional group affiliated with the National Science Teacher Association (NSTA). She is a proposal reviewer for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education and contributes to expert panels and serves on national advisory boards. She is an adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and has taught courses in technology integration, media research, and child development at Fordham University's Graduate School of Education and the New School for Social Research.

In 2016, Moeller presented sessions at the 13th International Conference on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) in Hamburg, Germany, and she regularly presents at the annual conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Council, the Council for Exceptional Children, and Learning Forward. Her recent publications include: "The Benefits of Undergraduate Research Fellowships for Students with Disabilities” (CUR Quarterly); "Building Relationships, Sharing Resources, and Building Opportunities: A STEM Learning Community Builds Social Capital for Students with Disabilities" (Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability); Integrating Technology with Student-Centered Learning; "Universal Design for Learning: Facilitating Access and Participation for All Students"; and "Making Standards-Based Mathematics Accessible to Students with Disabilities."

Moeller holds a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the New School for Social Research.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4205

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