Equity

Amy Brodesky

Email Amy Brodesky

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Amy Brodesky

First name: 

Amy

Last name: 

Brodesky

Bio: 

Amy Brodesky, a mathematics curriculum developer and professional development specialist, focuses on improving mathematics instruction for struggling learners with and without disabilities. She has led six related National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded projects, including her current project, Strengthening Mathematics Intervention Classes: Identifying and Addressing Challenges to Improve Instruction for Struggling Learners (SMI), that advance knowledge in this key aspect of mathematics learning and teaching.  The SMI project is studying current math intervention practices in the middle grades in order to create professional development (PD) and resources for teachers aimed at strengthening intervention and support for students.

Brodesky was the lead developer of an innovative model to differentiate PD to address teachers’ wide range of prior knowledge and experiences, using an approach described in “Moving Beyond One-Size-Fits-All PD: Differentiating Professional Learning for Teachers”. Using this differentiated model, the project team created three blended PD courses for teachers on fractions, decimal, and integer concepts from the Common Core State Standards. Brodesky co-authored an article, “Targeting Instruction with Formative Assessment Probes”, describing their approach to building teachers’ diagnostic approaches for identifying and addressing the mathematics learning needs of struggling learners.

Previously, Brodesky was the study leader and coauthor of “Math Education Practices for Students with Disabilities and Struggling Learners: Case Studies of Six Schools from Two Northeast States” and "Performance Patterns for Students with Disabilities in Grade 4 Mathematics Education in New York State" along with a similar study for Massachusetts.

Brodesky has extensive experience developing mathematics education materials, including the NSF-funded middle-grades program MathScape and the IBM-supported, technology-intensive program Measurement, Time, and Money for elementary children. She is the lead author of the article, "A Model for Collaboration" (Educational Leadership) and the coauthor of Digging into Data with TinkerPlots, a book of data analysis lessons for the middle grades.

Before coming to EDC, she was an educational software writer with Tom Snyder Productions.

Brodesky received her EdM in technology in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2518

Sarita Pillai

Email Sarita Pillai

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Sarita Pillai

First name: 

Sarita

Last name: 

Pillai

Bio: 

Sarita Pillai, an expert in effective strategies to broaden students' participation in STEM learning and careers, leads national resource centers that advance innovative R&D and deepen understanding of effective strategies to enhance the quality and equity of STEM education. She specializes in forming and sustaining strong communities of practice focused on improving STEM education and designing powerful technology-based resources that help engage and interest youth in STEM.

Pillai is the Principal Investigator of the NSF's STEM Learning and Research Center at EDC, which deepens the impact of the national ITEST program through technical support, dissemination, and outreach to better prepare a diverse, skilled, and innovative STEM workforce. She is the co-PI of the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL), and she is the co-PI of an NSF-funded initiative to lead a four day workshop at EDC headquarters in Waltham, Mass. that will engage renown researchers, K-12 educators, and disciplinary scientists in identifying effective strategies to support K-12 students’ computational thinking.

With her colleagues, Pillai has designed successful participatory design approaches to engaging underrepresented youth in STEM learning and future careers by placing them at the center of design and development efforts. She drew upon this approach to collaborate with middle schoolers to develop a series of math and science virtual learning experiences as part of the Middle School Portal project. She also used the approach to partner with teenage girls, who served as primary content producers for a series of Web-based videos on science and engineering careers (Girls Communicating Career Connections) and to facilitate the design of the youth-developed FunWorks science career exploration digital library. (Read a 2016 blog post by Pillai.)

Pillai is the coauthor of the report Next Generation STEM Learning For All (2016), the coauthor of a book on gender and equity in education, More Than Title IX: How Equity in Education Has Shaped the Nation (2009), and the coauthor of the chapter "Equity and Diversity" in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers. She regularly presents her work at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, the Massachusetts STEM Summit, and the National Science Teachers Association.

Before joining EDC, Pillai held various positions in software development, marketing, and business development.

She received a BS in computer science from Northeastern University and an MBA from Bentley University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2164

Caroline Parker

Email Caroline Parker

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Caroline Parker

First name: 

Caroline

Last name: 

Parker

Bio: 

Carrie Parker leads research to improve programs and policies for all students, particularly culturally and linguistically diverse youth, including those with disabilities and English learners. She examines a wide range of education reform issues including educational equity, technology integration, and strategies to enhance STEM learning and teaching.

In her capacity as Alliance Researcher for the REL Northeast & Islands at EDC's English Language Learners Alliance, Parker co-authored Patterns of English Learner Student Reclassification in New York City Public Schools that examines how long it takes English learners to reach English proficiency, as well as the Correlates of Academic Performance for English Language Learner Students in a New England District study, and a companion report that describes how to apply the study's analysis methods to similar data in other districts. She is working with Alliance members on English learner issues such as designing programs for Newcomer students and improving the process for identifying English learners when they register for school. Her research on dually-identified English learners (identified as both English learners and students with disabilities) has also been supported by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (MADESE). 

As co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of the STEM Learning and Research Center at EDC, Parker is working with a team that is deepening the impact of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program to better prepare a diverse, skilled, and innovative STEM workforce. Her STELAR blog describes four syntheses about the impact of ITEST projects over the last 12 years. She recently served as guest editor of the Journal of Science Education and Technology titled Innovations and Challenges in Project-Based STEM Education: Lessons from ITEST. She is also co-PI of the NSF-funded Technology Observation Protocol-Science (TOP-Science) project, which is designing and piloting a classroom observation protocol to measure the impact of innovative technology integration on high school science teaching. The framework used to design the protocol, Examining the Quality of Technology Implementation in STEM Classrooms: Demonstration of an Evaluative Framework, was published in the Journal of Research on Technology in Education.

Parker is PI of the evaluation of the Think College Transition Model Project, an innovative program providing students with intellectual disabilities access to college courses, funded by the Investing in Innovation (i3) program.

Parker is author or coauthor of multiple articles on STEM education programs for teachers and youth.  A sampling of some of her articles published include: “New Measures of English Language Proficiency and Their Relationship to Performance on Large-Scale Content Assessments”; “Processes and Challenges in Identifying Learning Disabilities Among Students Who Are English Language Learners in Three New York State Districts"; "Measuring Cognition of Students with Disabilities Using Technology-Enabled Assessments"; and "Teacher Views of Students in the Gaps."

Before joining EDC, Parker worked in Nicaragua as the director of the International Baccalaureate Program at Notre Dame Academy, and she has been a journalist and translator.

She received a BA in English literature from Williams College, an MEd from Framingham State College, and EdM and EdD degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2740

Mark Driscoll

Email Mark Driscoll

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Mark Driscoll

First name: 

Mark

Last name: 

Driscoll

Bio: 

Mark Driscoll, a nationally recognized leader in mathematics education, designs instructional resources and professional development materials that build mathematics teacher's capacity to enhance students' understanding and improve their learning outcomes. For the past decade, his work has centered on professional development for algebraic thinking and geometric thinking, with a particular eye on teachers of English learners.

Driscoll is responsible for a portfolio of work across projects aimed at improving mathematics instruction through teacher professional development. Recently, he directed two research projects: the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)–funded Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Learners study and the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded Fostering Mathematics Success of English Language Learners study. Drawing upon findings from the latter study, he and his team have launched a free website that offers middle school mathematics teachers proven strategies to support English learners’ success: Mathematical Thinking: Supports for English Language Learners.

In recent years, Driscoll has had several collaborations with Horizon Research, Inc., with WestEd, with Boston College, and with Measured Progress.  He is the author and coauthor of numerous publications on teacher professional development, including Fostering Algebraic Thinking, Fostering Geometric Thinking, and accompanying toolkits all published by Heinemann.

Driscoll is the recipient of the 2010 Ross Taylor/Glenn Gilbert National Leadership Award from the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics. From 2003 to 2007, he sat ex officio on the board of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics as Editor of their Journal of Mathematics Education Leadership. Recently, he served on the IES What Works Clearinghouse team developing the Practice Guide Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 through 8.

Before joining EDC, Driscoll helped start and taught at an alternative high school in St. Louis, Missouri, Logos School.

Driscoll received his BA from Boston College and, as a student of Gary Jensen, his MA and PhD in mathematics from Washington University in St. Louis, with a specialization in differential geometry.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2508

Gender Gaps in Assessment Outcomes in Vermont and the United States

Fri, 08/01/2008

Author(s): 

Josephine Louie, Stacy Ehrlich

Using data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP), the report examines how gender gaps differ between Vermont NAEP scores and U.S. NAEP scores and between Vermont NAEP and NECAP scores in grades 4 and 8. Overall and disaggregated by poverty and disability status, gender achievement gaps in Vermont resembled those in the country as a whole except in a few cases.

Cover

Length: 

68 pp.

Publication Type: 

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Migrant and Seasonal Head Start and Child Care Partnerships

Fri, 08/01/2003

Author(s): 

Valentina I. Kloosterman, Sheila Skiffington, Yvette Sanchez, Ellen Kiron

This report was the result of a collaborative study by the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) Collaboration Office and the Quality in Linking Together: Early Education Partnerships (QUILT) project located at EDC.

Migrant and Seasonal Cover

Download: 

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Publication Type: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Equity