Mathematics

Mary Fries

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Mary Fries

First name: 

Mary

Last name: 

Fries

Affiliation/Organization: 

EDC

Bio: 

Mary Fries, a highly skilled instructional designer and professional developer, brings expertise in mathematics education, including teaching, leadership, professional development, and curriculum planning and design. Her work reflects her commitment to designing resources and interventions that address “Mathematics Trauma” and seek to close opportunity gaps in mathematics education that serve to perpetuate racism.

Fries is a web and content developer and researcher on the Beauty and Joy of Computing project, which is adapting a University of California, Berkeley introductory computer science course into a high school AP Computer Science Principles course with the goal of helping diverse students enjoy and succeed at computer science. 

Fries is also the lead developer for the iPuzzle project, a two-year research and development initiative funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) that is creating apps for users to play, build, and share arithmetic and algebraic puzzles. The project’s first app is SolveMe Mobiles. She has also contributed to EDC’s Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards online resource for educators.

Recently, Fries coauthored EDC’s Transition to Algebra (TTA) curriculum published by Heinemann. TTA provides a full year of student and teacher materials that support struggling learners in enjoying and succeeding in algebra class. She is also the coauthor of Making Sense of Algebra: Developing Students' Mathematical Habits of Mind, a professional book that describes the teaching and learning principles espoused in TTA.  Fries provides TTA professional development for teachers around the country, and shares her work at the annual conferences of leading organizations such as the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

Before joining EDC, Fries served as the dean of mathematics, science, and technology at Windham High School in Windham, NH; as a board member and curriculum committee chair of the Academy for Science and Design Charter in Merrimack, NH; and as a member of the Windham Initiative for Renewable Energy.

Fries holds a BS in Mathematics through Mary Baldwin College’s Program for the Exceptionally Gifted, an MA in Philosophy and Religion from the California Institute of Integral Studies, and a CAGS in Mathematics Education from Boston University. 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2710

Kerry Ouellet

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Kerry Ouellet

First name: 

Kerry

Last name: 

Ouellet

Bio: 

Kerry Ouellet collaborates with instructional designers, professional developers, and researchers to create innovative online and print products that enhance STEM learning and teaching. She brings extensive editorial and management expertise to her product development work, as well as an in-depth knowledge of EDC’s full range of science and mathematics instructional resources.

Ouellet contributes to the conceptualization, content, design, and usability of EDC online learning experiences and resource hubs. Current and recent projects include the Concepts and Practices biology and chemistry high school curricula, the Mathematical Practice Institute, the Oceans of Data Institute, the HP Life Learning Initiative for Entrepreneurs, and the Exploring Bioethics high school supplement.

As a managing editor, Ouellet advances the goals of teams that develop a wide range of print curricula and professional development guides including the EDC Earth Science Curriculum, the Design It! and Explore It! out-of-school time science curricula, and Making Science Mentors: A 10-Session Guide for Middle Grades.  Serving as the liaison between staff and publishers, Ouellet collaborates with partners such as Carolina Biological Company, LAB-AIDS, the National Institutes of Health, Kendall/Hunt, Redleaf Press, Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, Kelvin, and Heinemann.

Ouellet also plays a key role in development work, establishing and implementing systems to guide the production and submission of proposals to government agencies, such as the National Science Foundation and Institute of Education Sciences, and private foundations.

Ouellet earned a BS in Business Administration from the Whittemore School of Business and Economics at the University of New Hampshire. She is also working toward a certificate in project management through the University of California, Irvine.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Editor I

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2570

Babette Moeller

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Babette

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Moeller

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Babette Moeller focuses on the development of and research on educational programs across the curriculum that help ensure elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students with disabilities are included in and benefit from educational reform efforts. As project director of numerous EDC R&D initiatives, she contributes her extensive experience designing and implementing technology-supported programs in general and special education, providing professional development for teachers and administrators in a variety of settings, and conducting formative and summative evaluation research.

Moeller is the Principal Investigator of an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study that is testing the impact of Math for All—a professional development program developed by EDC and Bank Street College of Education and published by Corwin Press—on teachers and students from Chicago Public Schools. Shown to have promise to positively affect teachers and students, Math for All prepares K–5 teachers to help students with diverse strengths and needs—including those with disabilities—achieve high-quality, standards-based learning outcomes in mathematics.

Recently, Moeller led a study of the impact of PBS LearningMedia on teachers' classroom practices, the quality of instruction, and student learning. Her team's findings indicate that PBS LearningMedia's digital content positively impacts student content knowledge and critical thinking practices when integrated into existing curriculum; teachers who participated in the study overwhelmingly reported that PBS LearningMedia made positive contributions to their classroom practices.

An active member of professional teacher organizations, Moeller represents EDC’s Center for Children and Technology within 100Kin10, a national network of organizations devoted to adding 100,000 more highly qualified STEM teachers to America’s classrooms by 2021. Moeller is also the Past President of Science Education for Students with Disabilities (SESD), a professional group affiliated with the National Science Teacher Association (NSTA). She is a proposal reviewer for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education and contributes to expert panels and serves on national advisory boards. She is an adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and has taught courses in technology integration, media research, and child development at Fordham University's Graduate School of Education and the New School for Social Research.

In 2016, Moeller presented sessions at the 13th International Conference on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) in Hamburg, Germany, and she regularly presents at the annual conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Council, the Council for Exceptional Children, and Learning Forward. Her recent publications include: "The Benefits of Undergraduate Research Fellowships for Students with Disabilities” (CUR Quarterly); "Building Relationships, Sharing Resources, and Building Opportunities: A STEM Learning Community Builds Social Capital for Students with Disabilities" (Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability); Integrating Technology with Student-Centered Learning; "Universal Design for Learning: Facilitating Access and Participation for All Students"; and "Making Standards-Based Mathematics Accessible to Students with Disabilities."

Moeller holds a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the New School for Social Research.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4205

Sarah Sword

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Sarah Sword

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Sarah

Last name: 

Sword

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Sarah Sword brings extensive expertise in research, mathematics instructional design, and teacher professional development. Currently, she serves as Principal Investigator for Assessing Secondary Teachers’ Algebraic Habits of Mind, a National Science Foundation (NSF) DRK-12 collaborative grant with colleagues from Boston University and St. Olaf College.

As the Founding Director of EDC’s Mathematics Curriculum Program, Sword has supported school districts and teachers in implementing curricula developed by EDC, including CME Project—a four-year high school mathematics program that is problem-based, student-centered, and organized around habits of mind. She was also as Senior Curriculum Developer and Core Writer for CME Project and was a Senior Curriculum Developer for Park City Mathematics Institute Secondary School Teacher Program, a mathematics immersion program for middle and high school teachers.

Sword is a co-author of the chapter, "Secondary Teachers' Mathematical Habits of Mind: A Paper and Pencil Assessment," published in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics book Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education 2015. In 2015, she presented at a Congressional Briefing held during the first U.S. National Math Festival, an event for which she co-authored the briefing paper Inspiring Teachers. She regularly shares her findings at the annual conferences of organizations such as National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics, and was an invited keynote speaker for the 2016 Boston College Math Education Colloquium Series.

Sword received an SB in mathematics from University of Chicago, a PhD in Commutative Algebra from Michigan State University, and had a post-doctoral fellowship in Mathematics Education at the Center for Mathematics Education at the University of Maryland.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-3770

Johannah Nikula

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Johannah Nikula

First name: 

Johannah

Last name: 

Nikula

Bio: 

Johannah Nikula helps teachers make engaging and intellectually stimulating mathematical learning experiences available and accessible to all learners. She specializes in designing and studying models of professional development for mathematics teachers, with a particular focus on working with students from diverse backgrounds and those who possess varying degrees of proficiency in English.

Nikula is co–Principal Investigator of Visual Access to Mathematics: Professional Development for Teachers of English Learners, a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop and study a blended face-to-face and online course focused on visual representations and supports for language access. She is also a key contributor to the NSF-funded Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards initiative, which is developing online resources and professional development materials that support teachers’ understanding and use of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP).

Previously, Nikula was co-Principal Investigator on two projects focused on students who are English Learners (ELs). For the NSF-funded Mathematical Record Keeping Supports Cognition and Communication study, she examined features of mathematics tasks that promote student record-keeping and investigated how those task features support cognition and communication for students, in particular for English learners (ELs). For the Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Language Learners project, funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), she oversaw a team that developed and studied professional development materials for middle-grades mathematics teachers focused on enhancing the mathematical learning and academic language development of students who are ELs. Nikula has also served as an instructional coach for mathematics teachers of ELs. (To learn more about Nikula’s work with mathematics teachers of ELs, read the recently published book, Mathematical Thinking and Communication: Access for English Learners.) In addition, she was one of the lead developers of middle grades statistics education resources for the Measuring and Addressing Middle-Grades Misconceptions in Statistics project funded by the NSF.

Nikula’s articles appear in journals such as Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School ("Supporting English Learners—Lessons from Research") and Mathematics Teacher Educator ("Developing Teachers’ Knowledge of a Transformations-based Approach to Geometric Similarity"). She has co-authored numerous professional books and chapters about mathematics teacher professional development and mathematics teaching and learning. Examples include Mathematical Thinking and Communication: Access for English Learners; A Mathematics Leader’s Guide to Lesson Study in Practice; Fostering Geometric Thinking: A Guide for Teachers Grades 5–10; the chapter "Secondary School Students’ Proportional Reasoning" in Teaching and Learning Mathematics: Translating Research for Secondary School Teachers; and The Fostering Algebraic Thinking Toolkit: A Guide for Staff Development.

Nikula received a BA in psychology with a minor in mathematics from Middlebury College and an EdM from Harvard University Graduate School of Education with a focus on Technology in Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director II

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2542

Pam Buffington

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Pam Buffington

First name: 

Pam

Last name: 

Buffington

Bio: 

Pam Buffington provides technical support in evidence based policy development and decisionmaking to state and local education agencies and is a project leader in the development and management of multiple professional development initiatives. She is an expert in technology integration in education with extensive work in the areas of mathematics and science, and has designed and implemented online and face-to-face professional development materials. As Co-Director of the Science and Mathematics Programs Unit, she leads a team of researchers, instructional designers, and professional developers in investigating and implementing strategies to improve students' learning outcomes.

Buffington is EDC's co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of the National Science Foundation-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory, an initiative focused on equity-oriented STEM education improvement. In this work, she leads a partnership with the Auburn, Maine School Department to improve student learning of mathematics in the early grades through the integration of interactive mobile technologies such as iPads. She has presented this work extensively at convenings such as the 13th annual International Congress on Mathematical Education and the conferences of organizations such as the National Rural Educators Association, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics.

As the co-PI of EDC's Visual Access to Mathematics study, Buffington is working with Mark Driscoll and Johannah Nikula to develop and study a blended-learning professional development program that will address the critical need to support middle-grades mathematics teachers in enhancing English learners' mathematics learning and promoting their college and career readiness. She also serves as a State Liaison and Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance Facilitator for the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded REL Northeast & Islands and a STEM technical assistance provider for Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) program grantees.

Buffington was the PI of the IES-funded Eliciting Mathematics Misconceptions: A Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment System, an initiative that developed and validated diagnostic formative assessments in the content area of rational numbers. She was also the Project Director for several initiatives, including the Maine Impact Study of Technology in Mathematics Intervention; the Enhancing and Extending the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives Project; SELECT Math Professional Development Intervention, Boston; and District Level Consultation–Standards-Based Mathematics Instruction. She also served as lead mathematics specialist in support of Maine’s Learning Technology Initiative.

In 2016, Buffington was selected to be the Richard H. Balomenos Lecturer by the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in New England (ATMNE) and presented the keynote “Strategic Use of Mobile Technologies as an Equity Move” at the ATMNE Conference. She also published her work extensively in 2016. She is a co-author of the chapter “Partnership-Based Research Approaches” in Rural Education Research: State of the Science and Emerging Directions, and co-authored the article “Enhancing Use of Learning Sciences Research in Planning for and Supporting Educational Change: Leveraging and Building Social Networks” (Journal of Educational Change). Through her work on the R+P Collaboratory, she has co-authored a series of briefs and reports on the role that interactive technology can play in enhancing mathematics learning, including Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics, Supporting Equity Through Co-Investigation: Sharing Student Videos, and Research+Practice Partnerships: Fostering Equitable Collaborations.

Before joining EDC, Buffington was the Director of Technology and Assessment Development for Learning Effects in Falmouth, Maine; a Project Director at TERC in Cambridge; and an adjunct faculty member at the Graduate School of Education, Instructional Technology Program, at Bridgewater State College. She has worked as a mathematics teacher and technology coordinator.

Buffington received a BS in secondary education and mathematics with a minor in Physics from University of Maine at Farmington, an MA in curriculum and instruction from Lesley College, and a PhD in education (integrating multicultural education, technology, and educational practice) from the Union Institute.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Co-Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

36 Brunswick Avenue
Gardiner, Maine 04345

Telephone: 

207-588-5022

Emily Fagan

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Emily Fagan

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Emily

Last name: 

Fagan

Bio: 

Emily Fagan develops innovative middle-grades mathematics curriculum and professional development materials that support teachers’ and schools’ efforts to improve math teaching and learning. In addition to designing online and face-to-face courses and workshops for teachers and students, she is an experienced facilitator and teacher.

Fagan is a co-author of the 2015 book, Bringing Math Students into the Formative Assessment Equation, and contributed to the development of the approach to formative assessment that is described in the book. She also played a key role as a developer for EDC’s Differentiated Professional Development Project, which created a hybrid professional development experience for building teachers’ math content knowledge, diagnostic skills and instructional strategies for supporting struggling math learners. Together with colleagues Amy Brodesky and Cheryl Rose Tobey, Fagan published “Targeting Instruction with Formative Assessment Probes,” an article in the 2016 Focus Issue of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics journal, Teaching Children Mathematics.  She continues her work focusing on struggling learners with the recently funded NSF project, Strengthening Mathematics Intervention.

Fagan was the Director of EDC’s MathScape Curriculum Center and led the revision of the MathScape: Seeing and Thinking Mathematically middle-grades curriculum. She was also a collaborator with the NSF-funded Show-Me Center at the University of Missouri and a developer of the Mathematics Improvement Toolkit, in collaboration with the National Forum to Accelerate Middle Grades Reform.

In 2014, Fagan co-authored two books published by Corwin: Uncovering Student Thinking About Mathematics in the Common Core (Grades K–2 and Grades 3–5). Previously, she contributed to Perspectives on the Design and Development of School Mathematics Curricula and A Decade of Middle School Mathematics Curriculum Implementation: Lessons Learned from the Show-Me Project. In addition, she has developed modules in the PBS Teacherline series and units of online courses for students in the National Repository for Online Courses.

Before joining EDC, Fagan taught mathematics and science in Brookline and Salem, Massachusetts, and mathematics and social studies in Philadelphia. As a teacher, Fagan was chosen for the Massachusetts Faculty of the Coalition of Essential Schools and served as a mentor teacher.

Fagan received an AB from Harvard University.

 

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

508-314-0558

Amy Brodesky

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Amy Brodesky

First name: 

Amy

Last name: 

Brodesky

Bio: 

Amy Brodesky, a mathematics curriculum developer and professional development specialist, focuses on improving mathematics instruction for struggling learners with and without disabilities. She has led six related National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded projects, including her current project, Strengthening Mathematics Intervention Classes: Identifying and Addressing Challenges to Improve Instruction for Struggling Learners (SMI), that advance knowledge in this key aspect of mathematics learning and teaching.  The SMI project is studying current math intervention practices in the middle grades in order to create professional development (PD) and resources for teachers aimed at strengthening intervention and support for students.

Brodesky was the lead developer of an innovative model to differentiate PD to address teachers’ wide range of prior knowledge and experiences, using an approach described in “Moving Beyond One-Size-Fits-All PD: Differentiating Professional Learning for Teachers”. Using this differentiated model, the project team created three blended PD courses for teachers on fractions, decimal, and integer concepts from the Common Core State Standards. Brodesky co-authored an article, “Targeting Instruction with Formative Assessment Probes”, describing their approach to building teachers’ diagnostic approaches for identifying and addressing the mathematics learning needs of struggling learners.

Previously, Brodesky was the study leader and coauthor of “Math Education Practices for Students with Disabilities and Struggling Learners: Case Studies of Six Schools from Two Northeast States” and "Performance Patterns for Students with Disabilities in Grade 4 Mathematics Education in New York State" along with a similar study for Massachusetts.

Brodesky has extensive experience developing mathematics education materials, including the NSF-funded middle-grades program MathScape and the IBM-supported, technology-intensive program Measurement, Time, and Money for elementary children. She is the lead author of the article, "A Model for Collaboration" (Educational Leadership) and the coauthor of Digging into Data with TinkerPlots, a book of data analysis lessons for the middle grades.

Before coming to EDC, she was an educational software writer with Tom Snyder Productions.

Brodesky received her EdM in technology in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2518

Al Cuoco

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Al Cuoco

First name: 

Al

Last name: 

Cuoco

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Al Cuoco is the lead author of CME Project, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded high school curriculum published by Pearson. Recently, he served as part of a team that revised the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS) recommendations for teacher preparation and professional development.

Cuoco is carrying out several professional development streams of work devoted to the implementation of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) Standards for Mathematical Practice, including EDC’s Mathematical Practice Institute (MPI). Through the MPI, he and his colleagues have launched a new course for teachers and facilitators, Developing Mathematical Practice in High School.

He co-directs Focus on Mathematics, a partnership among universities, school districts, and EDC that has established a community of mathematical practice involving mathematicians, teachers, and mathematics educators. The partnership evolved from his 25-year collaboration with Glenn Stevens on Boston University’s PROMYS for Teachers, a professional development program for teachers based on an immersion experience in mathematics. He also co-directs the development of the course for secondary teachers in the Institute for Advanced Study program at the Park City Mathematics Institute.

Cuoco is a co-author of three books published by the American Mathematical Society: Famous Functions in Number Theory, Applications of Algebra and Geometry to the Work of Teaching, and Probability through Algebra. In 2013, Cuoco and colleague Joseph J. Rotman co-authored the book, Learning Modern Algebra: From Early Attempts to Prove Fermat's Last Theorem (published by the Mathematical Association of America—MAA). Other recent books include Mathematical Connections: A Companion for Teachers and Others (also published by the MAA), Reasoning and Sense Making in Algebra (co-authored with Karen Graham and Gwen Zimmermann, published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics). His favorite publication is a 1991 paper in the American Mathematical Monthly, described by his wife as “an attempt to explain a number system that no one understands with a picture that no one can see.”

Recently, Cuoco was elected to the Board of Directors for Math for America-Boston and to the Advisory Board for the mathematics department at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Previous advisory roles included membership on the Massachusetts Board of Education’s Mathematics and Science Advisory Council and participation in the team that provided background research to the PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers) Content Frameworks for high school mathematics. Cuoco also provided background research to the writers of the CCSSM and the PARCC Content Frameworks for high school mathematics.

Prior to joining EDC, Cuoco taught high school mathematics to a wide range of students in the Woburn, Massachusetts public schools from 1969 until 1993. He draws constantly on his experience both as a mathematician and a teacher in his work in curriculum development, professional development, and education policy. 

A student of Ralph Greenberg, he holds a PhD in mathematics from Brandeis, with a thesis and publications in Iwasawa theory.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar/Advisor

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2563

Kristen Reed

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Kristen Reed

First name: 

Kristen

Last name: 

Reed

Bio: 

Kristen Reed leads studies that provide new insights into early childhood education and early mathematics learning and teaching, with a focus on the link between teacher professional development and student outcomes. Her work reflects her commitment to designing resources and professional development that make mathematics fun, challenging, and engaging for children and teachers. She is an experienced teacher, professional development facilitator, and researcher.

Reed is the co-Principal Investigator (PI), with Jessica Young, of a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded study, Games for Young Mathematicians, which examines the relation between a teacher professional development intervention and low-income preschool children’s school readiness skills and mathematics learning. The intervention gives preschool teachers effective strategies, using mathematics games and activities, to support children’s growth mindset and persistence.

She is also co-PI, with Young and Heidi Rosenberg, of two Heising-Simons Foundation-funded projects, Family Engagement in Early Mathematics and the Teacher Practices Observation Study. These projects examine how a professional development model can support teachers in engaging families in early mathematics activities through at-home games and mathematics mini-books that align with the mathematics games teachers are using in the classroom. Reed and colleagues are investigating the potential of this model for enhancing teachers’ mathematics instruction and improving children’s mathematics learning and school-readiness skills.

Reed contributed to the development of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness of College and Careers (PARCC) K–2 formative assessment tasks. These tasks are engaging for children, informative for teachers—tasks include detailed observation checklists that help teachers gain insight into student understanding—and serve as examples of how to engage children with the Common Core State Standards, with a particular focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Reed is also leading mixed data analysis and contributing to the design and implementation of the Mathematics Instructional Materials project. Funded by NSF, this longitudinal study is examining school districts’ implementation of elementary mathematics instructional materials (Everyday Mathematics or Investigations in Number, Data, and Space). Reed is studying the relation between district and school support for implementation, the school’s level of use of the materials, and the effects on student outcomes.  

Reed has coauthored publications on mathematics education and on teacher professional development, including “Play Games, Learn Math! Explore Numbers and Counting with Dot Card and Finger Games,”Mastery Motivation: Persistence and Problem Solving in Preschool,” “Designing K–12 Formative Assessment Tasks,” and “Mathematical Structure and Error in Kindergarten.” In addition, Reed and her colleagues have created resources for teachers and parents that are available on the Young Mathematicians website.

Before joining EDC, Reed taught 4th and 5th grade at a pilot school in Boston during the years when the Boston Public Schools were scaling up the implementation of Investigations in Number, Data, and Space. She has a BA in anthropology and a master’s degree in international comparative education from Stanford University, and an MEd in elementary education from Lesley University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2913

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