Mathematics

Mary Beth Piecham

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Mary Beth Piecham

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Mary Beth

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Piecham

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Mary Beth Piecham, a highly skilled researcher, advances the field's knowledge of effective K-12 mathematics instruction. Her research has focused on the role of curriculum and professional development in supporting teachers to enact mathematical practices to enhance students' understanding and enjoyment of mathematics.

Piecham is a co-Principal Investigator on Mathematical Practices Implementation Study, a National Science Foundation-funded study to understand how high school teachers’ implementation of a mathematical habits of mind curriculum, CME Project, impacts their mathematical knowledge and instructional practice. She oversees a team of researchers and developers, and is responsible for the research design, instrumentation, and analysis. As part of that work, Piecham has conducted classroom observations, designed instruments to measure fidelity of implementation, and conducted qualitative and mixed methods analysis.

In other work, Piecham was the liaison for the Focus on Mathematics Math Science Partnership, an EDC-led partnership with teachers, administrators, mathematicians, and mathematics educators to improve student achievement through content-based professional development and mathematical learning communities.

Before joining EDC, Piecham was a communications professional for eight years. Her work included leading the media outreach for a WBGH-produced PBS global health documentary and multimedia partnership and a national initiative to interest girls in engineering. She also served as public relations executive, third-grade teacher assistant, and afterschool tutor.

Piecham received a BA from North Carolina State University and an MEd in Curriculum and Instruction from University of Massachusetts-Boston.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2510

June Mark

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June Mark

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June

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Mark

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June Mark leads R&D related to mathematics and computer science teacher professional development, instructional design, and curriculum implementation. Her research interests include identifying systems and supports to ensure all students access quality mathematics and computer science learning experiences, building resources to support the learning of teachers and district leaders, and understanding and supporting high-quality instructional materials implementation.

Mark is the co-Principal Investigator, project director, and a co-author of EDC’s Transition to Algebra curriculum and companion book Making Sense of Algebra (Heinemann). She is co-PI with Deborah Spencer, Paul Goldenberg, and Laura O'Dwyer (Boston College) of an NSF-funded study of the implementation of Transition to Algebra. As the co-PI of iPuzzle, she is working to develop prototype apps for mobile devices (SolveMe Puzzles) that engage students in interactive exploration of Transition to Algebra’s logic-building mathematical puzzles.

As co-PI of Beauty and Joy of Computing for New York City, Mark plays a leadership role in an NSF-funded Mathematics and Science Partnership that is adapting UC Berkeley’s Beauty and Joy of Computing course for high school students and scaling it across New York City. Partners include UC Berkeley, the NYC Department of Education, and CSNYC (NYC Foundation for Computer Science Education). BJC aims​ to attract non-traditional computing students (especially female and underrepresented minority students) to the breadth and depth of ideas in modern computer science. The course will prepare students to take the new AP Computer Science Principles exam launching in spring 2017. Mark also serves as an advisor to the NYC Computer Science for All program evaluation, a collaboration between New York University's Research Alliance and EDC.

She is also co-leading the development of an NSF-funded website and course, Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards, that deepen teachers’ awareness and understanding of the Common Core’s Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP) by engaging teachers in using—and envisioning students’ mathematical thinking when using—the SMP. The professional development course will be published will be published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

As the co-PI for the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded project Coherent Implementation of Mathematics Instructional Materials, she co-leads a four-year, longitudinal, mixed-methods study of school districts’ implementation of elementary mathematics instructional materials. As Co-Director of the NSF-funded K–12 Mathematics Curriculum Center, Mark has provided technical assistance, resources, applied research, and professional development to help teachers and administrators make informed decisions about mathematics instructional materials. She presents findings from this work at national conferences.

Mark has a special focus on making new research findings on effective mathematics instruction useful to teachers and mathematics leaders. A few of her publications include How Do Districts Choose Mathematics Textbooks? (72nd NCTM Yearbook), Curriculum Leadership in Choosing Mathematics Materials (NCSM Journal), A Mathematics Leader's Guide to Lesson Study in Practice (Heinemann), The Fostering Geometric Thinking Toolkit(Heinemann), and Choosing A Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum (Heinemann).

Previously at EDC, Mark investigated how teacher leadership supports and sustains mathematics and science reform and documented community-based learning centers’ impacts on the lives of their primarily minority and low-income participants and their communities. She also coordinated software and materials development for educational products including The Geometric Supposer and Visualizing Algebra, software environments in which students can manipulate and investigate mathematical ideas in algebra and geometry.

Mark received her BS (Mathematics) and BSE (Decision Sciences) from the University of Pennsylvania, and an EdM from the Harvard University Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2548

Lynn Goldsmith

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Lynn Goldsmith

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Lynn

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Goldsmith

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Lynn Goldsmith leads studies that provide new insights into effective approaches to interdisciplinary STEM learning and strategies to help teachers become more thoughtful and effective in their mathematics instruction. Her recent research has focused on mathematics instructional design and professional development, explored possible relationships between arts education and STEM learning, examined principals' instructional leadership for mathematics, and investigated the role that emotions play in learning.

Goldsmith leads a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded initiative, STEAM Power, in which EDC and Artists For Humanity (AFH) are working to connect under-resourced youth in Boston, Mass. to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers through authentic art-making experiences that integrate STEM learning. Goldsmith also leads evaluations that examine the impact of a wide variety of educational interventions on student outcomes, and engages in collaborative research with colleagues at Mills College, Syracuse University, and WestEd.

Recently, Goldsmith supervised the research component of several EDC professional development initiatives funded by the NSF, including Turning to the Evidence, Supporting Staff Developers, and Formative Assessment in the Mathematics Classroom: Engaging Teachers and Students (FACETS). With colleagues from Boston College and Massachusetts College of Art and Design, she investigated the connection between arts and geometric thinking.

Her recent publications include “Visual-Spatial Thinking in Geometry and the Visual Arts" (article published in Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts), Mathematics Teachers’ Learning: A Conceptual Framework and Synthesis of Research; A Framework for the Facilitation of Teachers’ Analysis of Video; Examining Mathematics Practice through Classroom Artifacts; and “Developing Self-Regulating Learners: The Critical Role of Feedback" (ASCD Express). She is a co-author of The Fostering Algebraic Thinking Toolkit: A Guide for Staff Developmentand several guides for selecting rigorous curriculum materials (Choosing a Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum and the series Guiding Curriculum Decisions for Middle Grades—for language arts, mathematics, and science). She has also written about child prodigies, including coauthoring Nature's Gambit: Child Prodigies and the Development of Human Potential.

Before joining EDC, Goldsmith held research positions at TERC, Tufts University, and MIT.  

Goldsmith has a BA in Psychology from Yale University and a PhD in Child Psychology from the University of Minnesota, Institute of Child Development.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2529

Paul Goldenberg

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Paul Goldenberg

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Paul

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Goldenberg

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E. Paul Goldenberg has an exceptionally strong background in K–12 mathematics, extensive knowledge of the cognitive bases of mathematics learning, and over 40 years of experience in curriculum development at both elementary and secondary levels, teaching, research, and professional development. He has taught from Grade 2 through high school mathematics and computer science, as well as graduate school mathematics and psychology for education. He brings particular knowledge and expertise to curriculum development, which is his major focus at EDC. Recent primary authorships include two books: Making Sense of Algebra: Developing Students’ Mathematical Habits of Mind coauthored with June Mark, Jane Kang, Mary Fries, Cindy Carter, and Tracy Cordner (2015, Heinemann), and Developing Essential Understanding of Geometry and Measurement for PreK–Grade2, coauthored with Douglas Clements (2014, NCTM).

Goldenberg has served as Principal Investigator (PI) on a wide range of projects that foster a love of and enthusiasm for mathematics in learners from early childhood through adulthood. He, Al Cuoco, and June Mark have championed the use of mathematical habits of mind—now aggregated within the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice—as organizers of curriculum since their initial paper written in the early 1990s. One such curriculum is Transition to Algebra, the product of a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded R&D project that he co-led with Mark. This full year algebra curriculum was originally designed to support at-risk students and their teachers, and is now used equally to support and accelerate students in middle school. Goldenberg is also Co–PI for Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards, a project focused on professional development for teachers, and iPuzzle, a technology project that has developed apps (SolveMe Puzzles) based on puzzles used in Transition to Algebra. He is also PI, along with Mark and Cuoco, of BJC4NYC—an NSF Math and Science Partnership (MSP), a collaboration with UC Berkeley and the New York City Department of Education to broaden participation in computer science in the NYC public high schools.

Earlier at EDC, Goldenberg developed a K–5 comprehensive mathematics curriculum—now published as Think Math!—which supports teachers' professional development while they teach by building and feeding their interest in and curiosity about mathematics. This work was inspired by the classic Math Workshop curriculum, which, back in 1964, intertwined skill-building calculations with big ideas and deep understanding in a way that fully reflects today’s Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice, specifically standards 7 and 8. Though published before Common Core, Think Math drew its principles from the same sources that led to much of the Common Core, in particular the Practice standards.

Goldenberg received a BA in Psychology from Brandeis University and an EdM in Elementary Education and a PhD in Curriculum and Supervision from Harvard University.

 

 

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar/Advisor

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2513

Kristen Bjork

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Kristen Bjork

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Kristen

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Bjork

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Kristen Bjork creates authentic, engaging STEM learning experiences for students of all ages and backgrounds. She draws on her expertise in instructional design, science, science education, and the educational uses of technology to enhance K-12 learning and teaching.

Bjork is leading the development of a new middle school cybersecurity curriculum for SAE International, and is a developer of SAE International’s Gravity Cruiser and K–3 curricula. Recently, she played a lead role in the Crystal Museum of American Arts' 2nd Annual Distance Learning Summit.

With support from the Lilly MDR-TB Partnership and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Bjork developed and launched EPIDEMIC: TB in the Global Community, an educational project spearheaded by award-winning photographer David Rochkind featuring a website and two curriculum units designed to raise awareness about tuberculosis around the world. She contributed to the development of modules in the Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies (Ford PAS) curriculum that EDC designed with the support of Ford Motor Company Fund and that can be integrated into high school mathematics and science classes.

Bjork directed the Ethnobotany Explorers and Forensic Botany Investigations curriculum projects funded by the New York Botanical Garden, as well as science curriculum development projects funded by the National Park Service and the New England Board of Higher Education. She has also been Principal Investigator for National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded projects such as digNubia: Exploring the Science of Archaeology, Enlivening Genetics Education, and GLACIER.  She also collaborates with MathResources Inc. and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC).

Before joining EDC, she was a Research Technician in a biotechnology firm.

Bjork received an AB in biology from Dartmouth College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2706

Deborah Spencer

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Deborah Spencer

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Deborah

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Spencer

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Deborah Spencer’s career is distinguished by her drive to help teachers and administrators make thoughtful, informed decisions about mathematics curriculum and instruction. She brings extensive expertise in research and development in mathematics curricula, instructional design for professional learning, and teacher leadership in mathematics. She has a particular interest in standards-based mathematics curricula and has partnered with school districts, curriculum developers, and researchers to strengthen implementation efforts across the country.

Spencer and colleagues June Mark and Paul Goldenberg of EDC, and Laura O’Dwyer of Boston College, are co-principal investigators (PIs) for the NSF-funded study, Supporting Success in Algebra: A Study of the Implementation of Transition to Algebra, which is working with 70 schools across the country to look at the effects of an innovative course designed to support students at risk of failure in algebra.

Spencer is also currently the co-PI, with June Mark, of a large-scale study investigating the effects of a district-level improvement strategy centered on use of high-quality materials in 153 elementary schools by over 2000 teachers. Emerging results suggest a potential effect of well-supported interventions on student outcomes; schools with higher levels of support from districts on average had students who grew significantly more in 4th-grade math scores than schools with less support, even controlling for percentage of low-income students.

As co-PI of Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards, Spencer leads research and dissemination efforts for a project that is developing engaging online professional learning resources and a professional development curriculum for Grades 5–10 teachers to clarify the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP). Her team has field-tested the professional development with over 400 teachers, and pilot studies found promising results.

Spencer is also the co-PI for the iPuzzle project, which is developing engaging digital puzzles that build foundational ideas in algebra and are designed to influence student engagement, perseverance, and logical thinking. Dubbed “Solve Me Puzzles,” the collection includes SolveMe Mobiles, Who am I?, and MysteryGrid apps. SolveMe Mobiles is available for free download in the iTunes App Store and won “Best in Category” for Digital Media at the 2015 New England Book Show.

As a senior advisor to preschool projects, Spencer advances efforts to enhance young children's math learning and promote their school readiness and success. Currently, she is advising the Games for Young Mathematicians team in developing and researching a professional development program that shows Head Start teachers how to play fun, appropriate, and challenging math games with children, and gives them skills to scaffold children's persistence and support their growth mindset. She is also advising a related family engagement project funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation that is developing resources based on Games for Young Mathematicians for parents.

Previously, with June Mark, Spencer directed the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded K–12 Mathematics Curriculum Center (1997–2004), which provided resources on standards-based instructional materials, helping teachers and administrators make thoughtful, informed decisions about mathematics curriculum and instructional materials. The Center had extensive reach, serving 1,600 schools and 600 districts from all 50 states, and offering seminars to over 2,200 participants.

Spencer is coauthor of "Curriculum Leadership in Selecting Mathematics Instructional Materials" (NCSM Journal); "How Do Districts Choose Mathematics Textbooks?”; Mathematics Assessment: Cases and Discussion Questions for Grades K–5Teacher Leadership in Mathematics and Science; From Counting to Calculus: Connecting Across Grades; Casebook on School ReformExploring Classroom Assessment: A Guide for Professional Developmentand Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment.

Spencer received an AB from Dartmouth College and an EdM from the Harvard Graduate School of Education with a concentration in administration, planning, and social policy.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2558

Josephine Louie

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Josephine Louie

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Josephine

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Louie

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Josephine Louie has extensive experience conducting research in education and social science, with a background in quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Louie is a research leader for multiple projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), including the Research + Practice Collaboratory, a national, multi-site project that is exploring methods to build stronger links between educational research and practice in STEM, and the Visual Access to Mathematics project, which is developing and studying a professional learning program to promote teachers’ use of visual representations to support mathematics learning among English Learners in the middle grades.

Louie served as the co-Principal Investigator of Ocean Tracks and the Project and Research Director of Ocean Tracks – College Edition, two R&D projects that have been creating and studying an online learning resource that provides student-friendly access to large-scale professionally collected marine biology and oceanographic data. She oversaw formative and early summative research on the NSF-funded development of the ninth-grade Transition to Algebra curriculum. As a senior researcher for the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands, funded by Institute for Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education, Louie published on classroom formative assessment, national and state student assessment outcomes, and education practices for high-needs student populations.

Louie is the lead author of the article, Challenges to using the Regression Discontinuity Design in educational evaluations: Lessons from the Transition to Algebra study, published by the American Journal of Evaluation in 2016. She is the co-author of the forthcoming chapter, A Collaborative Approach to Strengthening K-2 Mathematical Practices with Technology, to be published in the Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education (APME) 2017. She is the lead author or coauthor of four IES studies: “An Examination of Two State-Supported Formative Assessment Initiatives in the REL-NEI Region,” “Gender Gaps in Assessment Outcomes in Vermont and the United States,” “Math Education Practices for Students with Disabilities and Other Struggling Learners: Case Studies of Six Schools in Two Northeast and Islands Region States,” and “New Measures of English Language Proficiency and Their Relationship to Performance on Large-Scale Content Assessments.”

Before joining EDC, Louie was a researcher for the Harvard River City Project, a multiyear study of a middle school science curriculum delivered through a Multiuser Virtual Environment Experiential Simulator (MUVEES). She was a Research Associate and Outreach Coordinator for the Metro Boston Equity Initiative at the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, Senior Data Analyst for the Harvard Immigration Project, and Research Analyst at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. Louie also worked as a researcher and writer for the documentary film company Northern Light Productions and as an urban planner for Wallace, Floyd Associates in Boston.

Louie received an AB from Harvard College, a master’s in city planning from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an EdM and EdD from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2883

Kevin Waterman

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Kevin Waterman

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Kevin

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Waterman

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Kevin Waterman brings significant expertise in instructional design, professional development, project management, and R&D. He specializes in the design and testing of innovation approaches to enhancing STEM education.

Waterman is a key member of several current EDC STEM initiatives, including: the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project “Broadening Participation of Elementary School Teachers and Students in Computer Science through STEM Integration and Statewide Collaboration.” In this STEM+C collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), EDC is developing a series of model curriculum units for grades 1-6 that integrate computational thinking into science and mathematics units. He is also the primary author of a middle school cybersecurity curriculum being developed for SAE, and is the mathematics and science subject matter expert in EDC's collaboration with Artists for Humanity on the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded STEAM Power project.

Previously, Waterman was a core writer on the NSF-funded CME Project, a four-year comprehensive high school mathematics program founded in problem-based, student-centered approaches to learning. He served as the editorial manager of the NSF-funded Linear Algebra and Geometry, a curriculum that teachers can use to challenge students who exhaust the mathematics offered by their school or that schools can build into their mathematics programs to provide an alternative to the typical sequence that ends with calculus. He also was a core writer on Developing Mathematical Practice in High School, a teacher professional development course funded by the Massachusetts DESE.

Waterman has led professional development seminars with teachers from the Boston Public Schools and with participants in Focus on Mathematics, an EDC-led partnership of teachers and mathematicians committed to increasing student achievement. He contributed “Mathematics Applied to Curriculum Development: Lessons Learned on the Job” for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 72nd Yearbook 2010.

Before joining EDC, he was Director of Product Marketing for HighPoint Systems and Principal Systems Engineer for Lotus Development Corp., working on knowledge management, news management, and computer-based training systems.

He received a BA in mathematics from Trinity College and an MAT in mathematics education from Boston University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2840

Mark Driscoll

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Mark Driscoll

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Mark

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Driscoll

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Mark Driscoll, a nationally recognized leader in mathematics education, designs instructional resources and professional development materials that build mathematics teacher's capacity to enhance students' understanding and improve their learning outcomes. For the past decade, his work has centered on professional development for algebraic thinking and geometric thinking, with a particular eye on teachers of English learners.

Driscoll is responsible for a portfolio of work across projects aimed at improving mathematics instruction through teacher professional development. Recently, he directed two research projects: the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)–funded Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Learners study and the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded Fostering Mathematics Success of English Language Learners study. Drawing upon findings from the latter study, he and his team have launched a free website that offers middle school mathematics teachers proven strategies to support English learners’ success: Mathematical Thinking: Supports for English Language Learners.

In recent years, Driscoll has had several collaborations with Horizon Research, Inc., with WestEd, with Boston College, and with Measured Progress.  He is the author and coauthor of numerous publications on teacher professional development, including Fostering Algebraic Thinking, Fostering Geometric Thinking, and accompanying toolkits all published by Heinemann.

Driscoll is the recipient of the 2010 Ross Taylor/Glenn Gilbert National Leadership Award from the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics. From 2003 to 2007, he sat ex officio on the board of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics as Editor of their Journal of Mathematics Education Leadership. Recently, he served on the IES What Works Clearinghouse team developing the Practice Guide Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 through 8.

Before joining EDC, Driscoll helped start and taught at an alternative high school in St. Louis, Missouri, Logos School.

Driscoll received his BA from Boston College and, as a student of Gary Jensen, his MA and PhD in mathematics from Washington University in St. Louis, with a specialization in differential geometry.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2508

Jessica Young

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Jessica Young

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Jessica

Last name: 

Young

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Jessica Mercer Young is dedicated to providing equitable learning opportunities for all children, with a particular focus on vulnerable and at-risk populations. An expert in child development, her research focuses on the intersection of developmental science and early childhood education, investigating the ways in which families, teachers, and schools promote children’s mastery motivation—persistence at challenging tasks, mathematics learning, and problem-solving skills.  Her work provides new insights into early childhood learning and teaching, with an emphasis on the link between teachers’ mathematics anxiety and beliefs about learning to child outcomes.

Currently, Young and co-Principal Investigator (PI) Kristen Reed are leading a National Science Foundation-funded study, Games for Young Mathematicians, that is examining the potential of a game-based professional development intervention to promote children’s mastery motivation and mathematics learning. The intervention facilitates teachers’ understanding of children’s mathematics development using developmentally appropriate, challenging, mathematics games and activities, and gives them effective strategies, using mathematics games and activities, to support children’s growth mindset and persistence. 

Young is also co-PI, with Reed and Heidi Rosenberg, of two projects funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation, Family Engagement in Early Mathematics and the Teacher Practices Observation Study. These projects examine how a professional development model can support teachers in engaging families in early mathematics activities through at-home games and mathematics mini-books that align with the mathematics games teachers are using in the classroom.

She is also an expert on the Early Language and Literacy Classroom Observation (ELLCO PreK) toolkit; leading Train-the-trainer seminars and professional development institutes across the country.

Young has coauthored publications on mastery motivation, early childhood mathematics education and teacher professional development, including “Mother-child Interaction as a Predictor of Mastery Motivation,” “Play Games, Learn Math! Explore Numbers and Counting with Dot Card and Finger Games,”Mastery Motivation: Persistence and Problem Solving in Preschool,” and “ Use of a Storytelling Context to Improve Girls' and Boys' Geometry Skills in Kindergarten” and “Building a Classroom Community that Supports English Learners in Preschool”. In addition, Young and her colleagues have created resources for teachers and parents that are available on the Young Mathematicians website.

Before joining EDC, Young taught preschool.  She received a BA in psychology from Boston College, an EdM in human development and psychology from Harvard University, and a PhD in applied developmental and educational psychology from Boston College.

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2728

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