Out-of-School Time

Kate Goddard

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Kate Goddard

First name: 

Kate

Last name: 

Goddard

Bio: 

Kate Goddard specializes in designing, implementing, and supporting the continuous improvement of technology- and media-based out-of-school time (OST) programs. Building on her experiences as a practitioner, she puts youth development at the center of her work, designing and supporting programs for educators that elevate inquiry and creativity as a tool for youth empowerment. Goddard contributes her expertise to initiatives that seek to strengthen and support the OST workforce, including the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), where she manages the work of the Technical Assistance Regional Representatives to ensure that school-age children in low-income families have improved access to high-quality learning experiences.

Goddard also serves as Project Director for the National Science Foundation’s Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES), a national initiative that is working to identify and scale up proven and innovative approaches for providing access to groups traditionally underrepresented and underserved in STEM fields.

Previously, Goddard advanced the mission of Adobe Foundation’s philanthropic initiative Adobe Youth Voices by building the capacity of programs and educators around the globe to implement youth media programming.

Prior to joining EDC, Goddard worked as a Program Director for the Community Technology Empowerment Project, managing and training AmeriCorps members on how to integrate media and technology into existing community technology centers. Earlier in her career, she facilitated creative learning experiences for youth at Phillips Community TV, the Science Museum of Minnesota, Denver Open Media, and Girls Inc. of Metro Denver.

She holds a BS in Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Associate Project Director

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, MA  02453-8313

Tracy McMahon

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Tracy McMahon

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Tracy

Last name: 

McMahon

Bio: 

Tracy McMahon brings extensive expertise in designing and conducting quantitative and qualitative research and evaluation studies. She specializes in survey design and implementation; qualitative data collection techniques such as interviews, focus groups, and observations; the development of logic models and literature reviews; and statistical analysis. Much of her work focuses on the implementation of program evaluations that seek to identify the effectiveness of formal and informal science education programs at K-12 and institute of higher education (IHE) levels.
 
Recently, McMahon co-authored the report Engineering for Every K-12 Student based on her team's work on the Massachusetts Engineering Innovation and Dissemination Community (MEIDC), an NSF-funded landscape study of K-12 engineering education in Mass. For the past four years, she has supported the NSF Broadening Participation in Computing Alliances (BPC-A) Evaluation as liaison to alliances and collected, analyzed, and reported data on efforts to broaden participation in computer science.
 
She holds an MEd in Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation; an MA in Higher Education Administration; and a BA in Communication and Sociology from Boston College.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2830

Megan Silander

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Megan Silander

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Megan

Last name: 

Silander

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Megan Silander conducts research that generates new insights into effective preK–12 education policies and programs. Her research interests include school and instructional improvement, accountability, and out-of-school time learning. She brings experience with qualitative data collection and analysis, experimental and quasi-experimental methods, and the analysis of extant and district administrative data.

Silander is the co-Principal Investigator of two National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded initiatives, "Zoom In! Learning Science with Data" and "Bringing Science Home with PEEP." She conducts research on Ready To Learn, a U.S. Department of Education-supported initiative led by PBS and CPB that EDC has studied for a decade and that has produced new findings on how to use transmedia resources to improve the school readiness of preschool children in low-income communities. She is also contributing her expertise to Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning, an NSF-funded study of how specific features of digital gameplay and subsequent instruction for middle-grade science learning can support consolidation and transfer of conceptual understanding beyond the game world.

She has coauthored several articles and chapters including, “Parent and Community Engagement and the Sustainability Challenge for Urban Education Reform” (in Education Reform in New York: Ambitious Change in the Nation’s Most Complex School System), “School Racial Composition and Young Children’s Cognitive Development” (in Integrating Schools in a Changing Society: New Policies and Legal Options for a Multiracial Generation), and “Instruction in High School: The Evidence and the Challenge” (The Future of Children).  She presents her findings at the national conferences of organizations such as Games+Learning+Society, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, CHI PLAY, and the American Educational Research Association.

Prior to joining EDC, Silander was a research scientist at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education and served as a deputy and policy analyst for a member of the Los Angeles Board of Education.

Silander holds a BA in linguistics from Pomona College, an EdM in international education policy from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a PhD in education policy from Columbia University. Her dissertation used quasi-experimental methods to examine the impact of school closure in New York City.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Fl
New York, New York 10014 

Telephone: 

212-807-4219

Ginger Fitzhugh

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Ginger

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Fitzhugh

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Ginger Fitzhugh leads evaluations that help programs leverage knowledge to achieve better outcomes for young people. She brings expertise in participatory program evaluation, systems thinking, and organizational development—as well as a commitment to identifying new strategies to advance educational access and equity, promote youth development, and foster school-community partnerships.

Fitzhugh leads a range of EDC evaluations that examine programs targeted to ensure all students receive strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educations, to enhance teacher professional development, and to improve informal and formal K–12 learning.

From 2014 to 2016, Fitzhugh served as Program Chair of the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) Systems in Evaluation Topical Interest Group. She has presented her findings at numerous AEA annual national conferences, and in 2009 she won AEA’s award for best poster presentation with Changing Horses Mid-Stream: Lessons Learned from Evaluator Transitions During Two ITEST STEM Projects. She is the author of several resources on challenges and successful strategies in conducting effective evaluations, including Survey Says? How to Visualize Survey Response Rates, Taking the Long View: Reframing Scale-Up and Sustainability Evaluations, and the EvaluATE blog post, “Show Me a Story: Using Data Visualization to Communicate Evaluation Findings.

Prior to joining EDC, Fitzhugh was a senior associate at Evaluation & Research Associates. Earlier in her career, she was a research associate at Brandeis University’s Center for Youth & Communities.

Fitzhugh received a BA in Psychology from Swarthmore College, attained an MM in Nonprofit Management and Evaluation from Brandeis University, and completed PhD coursework at Brandeis.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

206-395-4528

Wendy Rivenburgh

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Wendy Rivenburgh

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Wendy

Last name: 

Rivenburgh

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Wendy Rivenburgh is an expert in youth media education, technical support, communications, community building, and instructional design. To all of her work, she brings a deep commitment to empowering learners, supporting the creation of original works for a social purpose, and, in particular, tapping the potential of children and youth as the next generation of leaders and innovators.

Rivenburgh manages communications for the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services to ensure that low-income children have increased access to high-quality learning experiences.  She is responsible for strategic outreach and dissemination of materials, and serves as lead editor for NCASE products, including new and adapted print and electronic resources.

Rivenburgh previously led communications for Adobe Youth Voices (AYV), a project dedicated to working with educators and young people to apply their creative skills to solving real-world problems. The overarching goal was to increase creativity in education and equip youth media-makers to create social change through the power of digital storytelling.

In close collaboration with the Adobe Foundation, Rivenburgh developed a wide array of online and print communications that advance the AYV mission. She was the lead writer of an app about AYV, The AYV Story, which provides a moving, close-up view of the experiences of AYV youth media makers and educators. She was also the lead developer of the interactive AYV Program Guide, co-developed numerous curricular resources—including the video narrative curriculum, Moment of Truth—and was the author and editor of the AYV collection of program stories that highlights the experiences of participating youth and educators around the world.

Rivenburgh has contributed her skills to numerous other technology-infused youth development initiatives at EDC, including YouthLearn and the creation of a technology curriculum database for the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning at SEDL. She is the co-author of a chapter, “Working in Afterschool,” which shares lessons learned from the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, as well as a report on the ITEST Convening, Defining an Afterschool Research Agenda.

Before joining EDC, Rivenburgh taught English literature and writing courses at the high school and college level, and worked with young people in academic enrichment and other extracurricular activities.

Rivenburgh received her BA from Middlebury College and her MA in English from Boston College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2159

Leslie Goodyear

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Leslie Goodyear

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Leslie

Last name: 

Goodyear

Bio: 

Leslie Goodyear, a nationally recognized expert in educational evaluation and president-elect of the American Evaluation Association (AEA), has led studies at the local, regional, and national levels. She has conducted evaluations and evaluation capacity-building in formal and informal educational settings, afterschool programs, youth civic engagement, HIV prevention, youth development, and human services programs, with a recent focus on STEM educational programs in informal settings.

Goodyear coordinates evaluation initiatives and leverages evaluation capacity across the Learning and Teaching Division. Currently, she serves as the Principal Investigator for multi-year evaluations of NSF’s Broadening Participation in Computing–Alliances Program and Illinois 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program. Recently, she conducted a landscape study for the Committee on Communicating Chemistry in Informal Settings that informed a 2016 report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is continuing to support the Committee by evaluating how target audiences access and use the report.

Previously, Goodyear led extensive program evaluations of the Adobe Youth Voices initiative and the Teen Science Café Network. She also provided evaluation technical assistance and research agenda development for NSF’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Learning Resource Center and contributed a chapter to the ITEST publication Preparing Tomorrow’s STEM Workforce.

In addition to serving a three-year term as the president of AEA, Goodyear is the associate editor of AEA’s American Journal of Evaluation. She has held several other offices for AEA, including board member (2007-2009), member and chair of the AEA Ethics Committee (2004-2006), and Ethics section editor for American Journal of Evaluation.

Goodyear was one of 13 national out-of-school-time experts chosen to serve on the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Education’s Committee on Successful Out-of-School STEM Learning. In this capacity, she authored the chapter "Program Evaluation" in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning (2017) and contributed to the 2015 NRC report Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. She is the editor of Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice (2014), author of the chapter “Building a Community of Evaluation Practice Within a Multisite Program,” and editor of a special issue on ethics in evaluation in Evaluation and Program Planning.  

From 2009 to 2012, Goodyear was a Program Officer at the National Science Foundation, where she administered grants in the ITEST, Informal Science Education, Promoting Research and Innovation in Methodologies for Evaluation, and CAREER programs; supervised evaluation and research contracts; and developed directorate and division-level evaluation policy. Before joining EDC, she was National Director for Evaluation for City Year, Managing Editor for The Evaluation Exchange, an evaluation contractor, and a fundraiser and frontline staff member for education and human services organizations.

Goodyear received a BS from Macalester College and MS and PhD degrees from Cornell University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453

Telephone: 

617-618-2354

Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca

Last name: 

Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis works to promote the integration of rigorous academic content with opportunities for students to develop essential skills necessary for success in postsecondary education and the workplace. She seeks to excite students about learning in formal and informal education settings, while giving them the tools to succeed in their educational pursuits and beyond.

Lewis is the Director of EDC's Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE) Program Office, in which capacity she leads the provision of technical assistance to support the innovative ABE Program's sites and participating teachers. Previously, she co-led the Ford Motor Company-funded Ford PAS project which developed—and provides technical assistance and professional development for—a program that has evolved from an academically rigorous high school curriculum integrating academic and career education into a comprehensive community-wide high school reform strategy (Ford Next Generation Learning).

She brings extensive expertise in developing a wide range of STEM curriculum and professional development materials, including modules for Ford PAS and curriculum development work for the middle school Zero Robotics programming competition (a NASA Summer of Innovation program). On a regular basis, she contributes her science content knowledge, teaching experience, and skills in research and materials development to advising projects on their efforts to design instructional resources and support for teachers.

Lewis has worked with schools, districts, corporate funders, and community-based partners on EDC programs. She created a hands-on guide for teachers on how to integrate gender equity into existing science curricula, and she assisted with the development of classroom scenarios and working papers on science and mathematics education. She is the author of "Engaging the Controversy in Science Education: Scientific Knowledge and Democratic Decisions."

She received a BS from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, an MAT in biology from Northeastern University, and a CAES from Boston College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2935

Sarita Pillai

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Sarita Pillai

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Sarita

Last name: 

Pillai

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Sarita Pillai, an expert in effective strategies to broaden students' participation in STEM learning and careers, leads national resource centers that advance innovative R&D and deepen understanding of effective strategies to enhance the quality and equity of STEM education. She specializes in forming and sustaining strong communities of practice focused on improving STEM education and designing powerful technology-based resources that help engage and interest youth in STEM.

Pillai is the Principal Investigator of the NSF's STEM Learning and Research Center at EDC, which deepens the impact of the national ITEST program through technical support, dissemination, and outreach to better prepare a diverse, skilled, and innovative STEM workforce. She is the co-PI of the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL), and she is the co-PI of an NSF-funded initiative to lead a four day workshop at EDC headquarters in Waltham, Mass. that will engage renown researchers, K-12 educators, and disciplinary scientists in identifying effective strategies to support K-12 students’ computational thinking.

With her colleagues, Pillai has designed successful participatory design approaches to engaging underrepresented youth in STEM learning and future careers by placing them at the center of design and development efforts. She drew upon this approach to collaborate with middle schoolers to develop a series of math and science virtual learning experiences as part of the Middle School Portal project. She also used the approach to partner with teenage girls, who served as primary content producers for a series of Web-based videos on science and engineering careers (Girls Communicating Career Connections) and to facilitate the design of the youth-developed FunWorks science career exploration digital library.

Pillai is the coauthor of the report Next Generation STEM Learning For All (2016), the coauthor of a book on gender and equity in education, More Than Title IX: How Equity in Education Has Shaped the Nation (2009), and the coauthor of the chapter "Equity and Diversity" in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers. She regularly presents her work at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, the Massachusetts STEM Summit, and the National Science Teachers Association.

Before joining EDC, Pillai held various positions in software development, marketing, and business development.

She received a BS in computer science from Northeastern University and an MBA from Bentley University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2164

Sophia Mansori

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Sophia Mansori

First name: 

Sophia

Last name: 

Mansori

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Sophia Mansori explores and supports innovative uses of technology and media in formal and informal educational settings, youth development efforts, educator professional development programs, and changes in curriculum and instruction that address student engagement and achievement. As a program evaluator and researcher, she strives to help programs and funders engage in continuous improvement, as well as document and disseminate the impact of their work and lessons learned.

Mansori currently contributes to the evaluation of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s district-level systems change initiatives, and manages the statewide evaluation of the Illinois State Board of Education 21st Century Community Learning Center program. Her evaluation and research experience includes a number of STEM initiatives, such as the NSF-funded project, Formative Assessment in the Mathematics Classroom: Engaging Teachers and Students (FACETS), the Amgen Biotech Experience program, and the National Academy of Science’s Communicating Chemistry in Informal Settings project.

For six years, Mansori served as the Project Director on the program evaluation of Adobe Youth Voices, the Adobe Foundation’s global philanthropic initiative that supports youth in creating media to find their voice and take action in their communities. She has worked on a wide range of research and evaluation projects within the Learning and Teaching Division, employing both qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct formative and summative analyses. These have included evaluations of inquiry-based curricula, school-community collaborations, and capacity building efforts for afterschool staff. Early in her career at EDC, she conducted research on and provided technical assistance for community technology centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Mansori received a BA in English from Tufts University and an EdM in technology in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She completed course work through The Evaluators’ Institute and is a member of the American Evaluation Association.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2113

Tony Streit

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Tony Streit

First name: 

Tony

Last name: 

Streit

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Tony Streit is a nationally recognized expert in media education, youth development, out-of-school time, and informal STEM learning. He is dedicated to helping educators harness 21st-century tools to provide hands-on, student-centered learning that engages, motivates, and inspires young people. He specializes in providing direct consultation and assistance to the philanthropic community, tailoring services to meet the needs of both corporate and private funders.

Streit is Principal Investigator for EDC's National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE). Funded by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care, EDC and its partners—the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST), the National Summer Learning Association, and WRMA, Inc.—are providing materials and training to ensure that all school-age children can access high-quality afterschool and summer learning experiences that promote their development and academic achievement.

Since 2002, Streit has directed The YouthLearn Initiative, a broad array of research, promising practices, and curricular strategies on community-based, contextual learning intended to build critical thinking, creativity, content knowledge, and other skills that are essential to college and career success. Streit and his team provide professional development, program materials, research and evaluation, and technical assistance to organizations and educators in both formal and nonformal settings.

For 10 years, Streit led program management of the Adobe Youth Voices initiative, a global professional development effort for both in-school and afterschool educators in youth media-making.  From 2013 to 2015, Streit’s team provided technical assistance for The Robert R. McCormick Foundation's Why News Matters, a three-year initiative to advance news literacy across Chicago. In addition to his project work, Streit serves as the Director of EDC’s corporate office in Chicago, where he provides guidance to local project staff and oversees regional outreach and development.

Streit has been a consultant and trainer on project-based learning (PBL) in afterschool for the Massachusetts Department of Education’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers program for over 10 years. Through workshops coordinated by NIOST, Streit facilitates train-the-trainer style experiences emphasizing the value of creativity and critical thinking skills, inquiry as an instructional approach, and intentional connections to school-day learning. Through this work, a PBL approach has now become a required element of all afterschool programs in Massachusetts.

Similar past projects include co-development of The Afterschool Academies, a comprehensive training approach for afterschool educators developed for the Mott Foundation, management of the National Science Foundation (NSF) ITEST Learning Resource Center (now STELAR, for which Streit is a senior advisor); and consultation with the Verizon Foundation on best strategies to engage afterschool educators in their use of the Thinkfinity educator portal.  He has also collaborated with Noyce Foundation, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Bechtel Foundation, SEDL, MIT Media Lab, Open Society Institute, Time Warner, Kellogg Foundation, USAID, National Institute for Out of School Time, and numerous schools, youth centers, state agencies and school districts across the US and overseas.

Streit is the co-creator of Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide and the co-author of ITEST Convening Report: Defining an Afterschool Research Agenda and the chapter "Working in Afterschool" published in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers.  

Currently, Streit is a Board Member and the Treasurer of the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) and served as Chair of NAMLE’s 2017 National Conference in Chicago. Previously, he served on the Technical Working Group on STEM for the US Department of Education's 21st Century Community Learning Center Program. He has also served as an advisor to the Next Generation Youth Work Coalition, the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, the Informal Learning in Science and Afterschool Project, and the Ready to Learn Partnership.

Before joining EDC, Streit was Co-Founder and Co-Director of Street-Level Youth Media, a Chicago organization that he helped build into a nationally recognized youth development model.

Streit received a BA in communications and economics from University of Notre Dame, and studied documentary filmmaking at Columbia College Chicago.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

770 North Halsted Street, Suite 205
Chicago, Illinois 60622

Telephone: 

312-962-4521

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