Out-of-School Time

EDC, Tufts Students to Expand Chicago Afterschool Science in Cambridge

In spring 2012, a National Science Foundation Informal Science Education project led by Bryan Wunar, Exploring Trees and Ponds, will expand to two new afterschool program sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Currently under way in three afterschool programs in Chicago, the project helps informal science educators engage youth ages 10-14 in long-term observations of natural objects and use of digital photography to document changes.

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Leslie Goodyear

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Leslie Goodyear

First name: 

Leslie

Last name: 

Goodyear

Bio: 

Leslie Goodyear, a nationally recognized expert in educational evaluation and president-elect of the American Evaluation Association (AEA), has led studies at the local, regional, and national levels. She has conducted evaluations and evaluation capacity-building in formal and informal educational settings, afterschool programs, youth civic engagement, HIV prevention, youth development, and human services programs, with a recent focus on STEM educational programs in informal settings.

Goodyear coordinates evaluation initiatives and leverages evaluation capacity across the Learning and Teaching Division. Currently, she serves as the Principal Investigator for multi-year evaluations of NSF’s Broadening Participation in Computing–Alliances Program and Illinois 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program. Recently, she conducted a landscape study for the Committee on Communicating Chemistry in Informal Settings that informed a 2016 report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is continuing to support the Committee by evaluating how target audiences access and use the report.

Previously, Goodyear led extensive program evaluations of the Adobe Youth Voices initiative and the Teen Science Café Network. She also provided evaluation technical assistance and research agenda development for NSF’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Learning Resource Center and contributed a chapter to the ITEST publication Preparing Tomorrow’s STEM Workforce.

In addition to serving a three-year term as the president of AEA, Goodyear is the associate editor of AEA’s American Journal of Evaluation. She has held several other offices for AEA, including board member (2007-2009), member and chair of the AEA Ethics Committee (2004-2006), and Ethics section editor for American Journal of Evaluation.

Goodyear was one of 13 national out-of-school-time experts chosen to serve on the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Education’s Committee on Successful Out-of-School STEM Learning. In this capacity, she authored the chapter "Program Evaluation" in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning (2017) and contributed to the 2015 NRC report Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. She is the editor of Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice (2014), author of the chapter “Building a Community of Evaluation Practice Within a Multisite Program,” and editor of a special issue on ethics in evaluation in Evaluation and Program Planning.  

From 2009 to 2012, Goodyear was a Program Officer at the National Science Foundation, where she administered grants in the ITEST, Informal Science Education, Promoting Research and Innovation in Methodologies for Evaluation, and CAREER programs; supervised evaluation and research contracts; and developed directorate and division-level evaluation policy. (Read a blog post by Goodyear about strengthening PI/evaluator partnerships.) Before joining EDC, she was National Director for Evaluation for City Year, Managing Editor for The Evaluation Exchange, an evaluation contractor, and a fundraiser and frontline staff member for education and human services organizations.

Goodyear received a BS from Macalester College and MS and PhD degrees from Cornell University.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453

Telephone: 

617-618-2354

Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca

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Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis works to promote the integration of rigorous academic content with opportunities for students to develop essential skills necessary for success in postsecondary education and the workplace. She seeks to excite students about learning in formal and informal education settings, while giving them the tools to succeed in their educational pursuits and beyond.

Lewis is the Director of EDC's Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE) Program Office, in which capacity she leads the provision of technical assistance to support the innovative ABE Program's sites and participating teachers. Previously, she co-led the Ford Motor Company-funded Ford PAS project which developed—and provides technical assistance and professional development for—a program that has evolved from an academically rigorous high school curriculum integrating academic and career education into a comprehensive community-wide high school reform strategy (Ford Next Generation Learning).

She brings extensive expertise in developing a wide range of STEM curriculum and professional development materials, including modules for Ford PAS and curriculum development work for the middle school Zero Robotics programming competition (a NASA Summer of Innovation program). On a regular basis, she contributes her science content knowledge, teaching experience, and skills in research and materials development to advising projects on their efforts to design instructional resources and support for teachers.

Lewis has worked with schools, districts, corporate funders, and community-based partners on EDC programs. She created a hands-on guide for teachers on how to integrate gender equity into existing science curricula, and she assisted with the development of classroom scenarios and working papers on science and mathematics education. She is the author of "Engaging the Controversy in Science Education: Scientific Knowledge and Democratic Decisions."

She received a BS from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, an MAT in biology from Northeastern University, and a CAES from Boston College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2935

Out-of-School Time

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

In the U.S., over 10 million young people take part in out-of-school time programs that play a key role in promoting their learning and well-being, and studies show that 19 million more would do so if programs were available. EDC helps expand access to high-quality OST programs that support children and youth—especially those in high-poverty urban and rural areas—by providing safe, positive environments that engage and inspire them, help them explore careers, and enhance their work in school.

Sarita Pillai

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Sarita Pillai

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Sarita

Last name: 

Pillai

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Sarita Pillai, an expert in effective strategies to broaden students' participation in STEM learning and careers, leads national resource centers that advance innovative R&D and deepen understanding of effective strategies to enhance the quality and equity of STEM education. She specializes in forming and sustaining strong communities of practice focused on improving STEM education and designing powerful technology-based resources that help engage and interest youth in STEM.

Pillai is the Principal Investigator of the NSF's STEM Learning and Research Center at EDC, which deepens the impact of the national ITEST program through technical support, dissemination, and outreach to better prepare a diverse, skilled, and innovative STEM workforce. She is the co-PI of the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL), and she is the co-PI of an NSF-funded initiative to lead a four day workshop at EDC headquarters in Waltham, Mass. that will engage renown researchers, K-12 educators, and disciplinary scientists in identifying effective strategies to support K-12 students’ computational thinking.

With her colleagues, Pillai has designed successful participatory design approaches to engaging underrepresented youth in STEM learning and future careers by placing them at the center of design and development efforts. She drew upon this approach to collaborate with middle schoolers to develop a series of math and science virtual learning experiences as part of the Middle School Portal project. She also used the approach to partner with teenage girls, who served as primary content producers for a series of Web-based videos on science and engineering careers (Girls Communicating Career Connections) and to facilitate the design of the youth-developed FunWorks science career exploration digital library. (Read a 2016 blog post by Pillai.)

Pillai is the coauthor of the report Next Generation STEM Learning For All (2016), the coauthor of a book on gender and equity in education, More Than Title IX: How Equity in Education Has Shaped the Nation (2009), and the coauthor of the chapter "Equity and Diversity" in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers. She regularly presents her work at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, the Massachusetts STEM Summit, and the National Science Teachers Association.

Before joining EDC, Pillai held various positions in software development, marketing, and business development.

She received a BS in computer science from Northeastern University and an MBA from Bentley University.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2164

Sophia Mansori

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Sophia Mansori

First name: 

Sophia

Last name: 

Mansori

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Sophia Mansori explores and supports innovative uses of technology and media in formal and informal educational settings, youth development efforts, educator professional development programs, and changes in curriculum and instruction that address student engagement and achievement. As a program evaluator and researcher, she strives to help programs and funders engage in continuous improvement, as well as document and disseminate the impact of their work and lessons learned.

Mansori currently contributes to the evaluation of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s district-level systems change initiatives, and manages the statewide evaluation of the Illinois State Board of Education 21st Century Community Learning Center program. Her evaluation and research experience includes a number of STEM initiatives, such as the NSF-funded project, Formative Assessment in the Mathematics Classroom: Engaging Teachers and Students (FACETS), the Amgen Biotech Experience program, and the National Academy of Science’s Communicating Chemistry in Informal Settings project.

For six years, Mansori served as the Project Director on the program evaluation of Adobe Youth Voices, the Adobe Foundation’s global philanthropic initiative that supports youth in creating media to find their voice and take action in their communities. She has worked on a wide range of research and evaluation projects within the Learning and Teaching Division, employing both qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct formative and summative analyses. These have included evaluations of inquiry-based curricula, school-community collaborations, and capacity building efforts for afterschool staff. Early in her career at EDC, she conducted research on and provided technical assistance for community technology centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Mansori received a BA in English from Tufts University and an EdM in technology in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She completed course work through The Evaluators’ Institute and is a member of the American Evaluation Association.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2113

Tony Streit

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Tony Streit

First name: 

Tony

Last name: 

Streit

Bio: 

Tony Streit is a nationally recognized expert in media education, youth development, out-of-school time, and informal STEM learning. He is dedicated to helping educators harness 21st-century tools to provide hands-on, student-centered learning that engages, motivates, and inspires young people. He specializes in providing direct consultation and assistance to the philanthropic community, tailoring services to meet the needs of both corporate and private funders.

Streit is Principal Investigator for EDC's National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE). Funded by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care, EDC and its partners—the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST), the National Summer Learning Association, and WRMA, Inc.—are providing materials and training to ensure that all school-age children can access high-quality afterschool and summer learning experiences that promote their development and academic achievement.

Since 2002, Streit has directed The YouthLearn Initiative, a broad array of research, promising practices, and curricular strategies on community-based, contextual learning intended to build critical thinking, creativity, content knowledge, and other skills that are essential to college and career success. Streit and his team provide professional development, program materials, research and evaluation, and technical assistance to organizations and educators in both formal and nonformal settings.

For 10 years, Streit led program management of the Adobe Youth Voices initiative, a global professional development effort for both in-school and afterschool educators in youth media-making.  From 2013 to 2015, Streit’s team provided technical assistance for The Robert R. McCormick Foundation's Why News Matters, a three-year initiative to advance news literacy across Chicago. (Read a blog post by Streit about youth media-making.)  In addition to his project work, Streit serves as the Director of EDC’s corporate office in Chicago, where he provides guidance to local project staff and oversees regional outreach and development.

Streit has been a consultant and trainer on project-based learning (PBL) in afterschool for the Massachusetts Department of Education’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers program for over 10 years. Through workshops coordinated by NIOST, Streit facilitates train-the-trainer style experiences emphasizing the value of creativity and critical thinking skills, inquiry as an instructional approach, and intentional connections to school-day learning. Through this work, a PBL approach has now become a required element of all afterschool programs in Massachusetts.

Similar past projects include co-development of The Afterschool Academies, a comprehensive training approach for afterschool educators developed for the Mott Foundation, management of the National Science Foundation (NSF) ITEST Learning Resource Center (now STELAR, for which Streit is a senior advisor); and consultation with the Verizon Foundation on best strategies to engage afterschool educators in their use of the Thinkfinity educator portal.  He has also collaborated with Noyce Foundation, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Bechtel Foundation, SEDL, MIT Media Lab, Open Society Institute, Time Warner, Kellogg Foundation, USAID, National Institute for Out of School Time, and numerous schools, youth centers, state agencies and school districts across the US and overseas.

Streit is the co-creator of Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide and the co-author of ITEST Convening Report: Defining an Afterschool Research Agenda and the chapter "Working in Afterschool" published in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers.  

Currently, Streit is a Board Member and the Treasurer of the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) and served as Chair of NAMLE’s 2017 National Conference in Chicago. Previously, he served on the Technical Working Group on STEM for the US Department of Education's 21st Century Community Learning Center Program. He has also served as an advisor to the Next Generation Youth Work Coalition, the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, the Informal Learning in Science and Afterschool Project, and the Ready to Learn Partnership.

Before joining EDC, Streit was Co-Founder and Co-Director of Street-Level Youth Media, a Chicago organization that he helped build into a nationally recognized youth development model.

Streit received a BA in communications and economics from University of Notre Dame, and studied documentary filmmaking at Columbia College Chicago.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

770 North Halsted Street, Suite 205
Chicago, Illinois 60622

Telephone: 

312-962-4521

Caroline Parker

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Caroline Parker

First name: 

Caroline

Last name: 

Parker

Bio: 

Carrie Parker leads research to improve programs and policies for all students, particularly culturally and linguistically diverse youth, including those with disabilities and English learners. She examines a wide range of education reform issues including educational equity, technology integration, and strategies to enhance STEM learning and teaching.

In her capacity as Alliance Researcher for the REL Northeast & Islands at EDC's English Language Learners Alliance, Parker co-authored Patterns of English Learner Student Reclassification in New York City Public Schools that examines how long it takes English learners to reach English proficiency, as well as the Correlates of Academic Performance for English Language Learner Students in a New England District study, and a companion report that describes how to apply the study's analysis methods to similar data in other districts. She is working with Alliance members on English learner issues such as designing programs for Newcomer students and improving the process for identifying English learners when they register for school. Her research on dually-identified English learners (identified as both English learners and students with disabilities) has also been supported by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (MADESE). 

As co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of the STEM Learning and Research Center at EDC, Parker is working with a team that is deepening the impact of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program to better prepare a diverse, skilled, and innovative STEM workforce. Her STELAR blog describes four syntheses about the impact of ITEST projects over the last 12 years. She recently served as guest editor of the Journal of Science Education and Technology titled Innovations and Challenges in Project-Based STEM Education: Lessons from ITEST. She is also co-PI of the NSF-funded Technology Observation Protocol-Science (TOP-Science) project, which is designing and piloting a classroom observation protocol to measure the impact of innovative technology integration on high school science teaching. The framework used to design the protocol, Examining the Quality of Technology Implementation in STEM Classrooms: Demonstration of an Evaluative Framework, was published in the Journal of Research on Technology in Education.

Parker is PI of the evaluation of the Think College Transition Model Project, an innovative program providing students with intellectual disabilities access to college courses, funded by the Investing in Innovation (i3) program.

Parker is author or coauthor of multiple articles on STEM education programs for teachers and youth.  A sampling of some of her articles published include: “New Measures of English Language Proficiency and Their Relationship to Performance on Large-Scale Content Assessments”; “Processes and Challenges in Identifying Learning Disabilities Among Students Who Are English Language Learners in Three New York State Districts"; "Measuring Cognition of Students with Disabilities Using Technology-Enabled Assessments"; and "Teacher Views of Students in the Gaps."

Before joining EDC, Parker worked in Nicaragua as the director of the International Baccalaureate Program at Notre Dame Academy, and she has been a journalist and translator.

She received a BA in English literature from Williams College, an MEd from Framingham State College, and EdM and EdD degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2740

Siobhan Bredin

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Siobhan Bredin

First name: 

Siobhan

Last name: 

Bredin

Bio: 

Siobhan Bredin is a highly experienced technical assistance provider, product developer, information dissemination specialist, and project director. She brings expertise in information architecture design, collaborative technical assistance, and developing and sustaining communities of practice and professional learning communities. 

As Director of Training and Technical Assistance for the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), she manages a national TTA team dedicated to ensuring that school-age children in families of low income have increased access to high-quality afterschool and summer learning experiences that contribute to their overall development and academic achievement.

As Product Manager for Online Learning for the National Center on Program Management and Fiscal Operations, Bredin advanced the Center’s goals of offering training and resources to strengthen the management of Head Start and Early Head Start programs and achieve positive outcomes for young children and their families. She also served as a staff member for the Head Start New England Resource Center, designing and providing technical assistance to build the capacity of community-based Head Start agencies to use information technology to support their work.

From 2003 to 2012, Bredin served as Co-Principal Investigator and Project Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Learning Resource Center, which built the capacity of project staff across the country who deliver learning and career exploration programs to populations traditionally underrepresented in STEM. In this initiative, she worked in partnership with the EdLab Group on NSF’s National Girls Collaborative project. She also helped develop and pilot the U.S. Department of Education’s IT Career Cluster model and framework, and helped run online professional development courses on developing IT skills assessments. (Read a blog post by Bredin about the ITEST Community of Practice.)

Bredin is coauthor of several publications on the ITEST program, learning communities, and partnerships, including “The ITEST Community of Practice: Lessons and Implications” (published in the report Preparing Tomorrow’s STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers) and Seven Lessons Learned Over Eight Years of Hosting the National ITEST Learning Resource Center.  

Before joining EDC, Bredin worked at several software and Internet companies as a training specialist and product manager. Earlier in her career, she was an early childhood teacher, curriculum developer, and creator of new programs.

She received her BA in psychology from Wellesley College and EdM from Lesley University.  

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2916

Design It! Engineering in After School Programs

Sun, 09/01/2002

Author(s): 

Bernard Zubrowski, Charlie Hutchison

A series of 14 design engineering booklets that include student and teacher guidance for implementing long-term activities such as designing a pinball game or building a trebuchet. The projects were developed for 8-12 year olds in after school programs.

Cover of a Design It Guide

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