Out-of-School Time

ITEST Mentoring Models

Date: 

01/22/2015
Free Online Event

From 3:00-4:00 ET, join staff from EDC's STEM Learning and Resource Center for a free webinar focused on the many mentoring models used by Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) projects. During the webinar, staff from three ITEST projects will share their mentoring structures, goals, challenges and successes. Learn more and register.

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Ginger Fitzhugh

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Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

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First name: 

Ginger

Last name: 

Fitzhugh

Bio: 

Ginger Fitzhugh leads evaluations that help programs leverage knowledge to achieve better outcomes for young people. She brings expertise in participatory program evaluation, systems thinking, and organizational development—as well as a commitment to identifying new strategies to advance educational access and equity, promote youth development, and foster school-community partnerships.

Fitzhugh leads a range of EDC evaluations that examine programs targeted to ensure all students receive strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educations, to enhance teacher professional development, and to improve informal and formal K–12 learning.

From 2014 to 2016, Fitzhugh served as Program Chair of the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) Systems in Evaluation Topical Interest Group. She has presented her findings at numerous AEA annual national conferences, and in 2009 she won AEA’s award for best poster presentation with Changing Horses Mid-Stream: Lessons Learned from Evaluator Transitions During Two ITEST STEM Projects. She is the author of several resources on challenges and successful strategies in conducting effective evaluations, including Survey Says? How to Visualize Survey Response Rates, Taking the Long View: Reframing Scale-Up and Sustainability Evaluations, and the EvaluATE blog post, “Show Me a Story: Using Data Visualization to Communicate Evaluation Findings.

Prior to joining EDC, Fitzhugh was a senior associate at Evaluation & Research Associates. Earlier in her career, she was a research associate at Brandeis University’s Center for Youth & Communities.

Fitzhugh received a BA in Psychology from Swarthmore College, attained an MM in Nonprofit Management and Evaluation from Brandeis University, and completed PhD coursework at Brandeis.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

206-395-4528

Learning Science: Taking Stock of What Happens Outside of School

This National Science Foundation (NSF) press release notes that an EDC project led by Dr. Jim Diamond, “Planning a Design-based Implementation Research Agenda to Investigate Digital Badges as Transformative Assessment in Informal Science Learning," has been selected as one of six projects to be funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through the new Science Learning+ initiative. In the new initiative, the NSF, Wellcome Trust--a global charitable foundation based in the U.K.--and the U.K.'s Economic and Social Research Council have joined forces to advance the field of informal science education. The initiative's long-term goals are "to broaden participation in STEM and to better understand, strengthen and coordinate STEM engagement and lifelong learning." Three U.S.-based foundations--the Noyce Foundation, the George and Betty Moore Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation--are participating in supporting this effort.

Source: 

National Science Foundation

Publication Date: 

Tue, 12/02/2014

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Re-Imagining Science Fairs

Teaser: 

Abigail Jurist Levy has over 22 years of experience in the fields of K­–12 education and adult workforce development. She leads teams of researchers in multiyear, multisite studies focused on issues such as science teaching and learning, the teaching workforce, and sustainability of K–20 education reform. Currently, Levy is leading the first large-scale study of science fairs in the United States, "Science Fairs Under the 'Scope." In this post, she shares some thoughts about the “Fake Science Fair Poster” that swept social media this past spring and the new science fair study.

Abigail Jurist Levy has over 22 years of experience in the fields of K­–12 education and adult workforce development. She leads teams of researchers in multiyear, multisite studies focused on issues such as science teaching and learning, the teaching workforce, and sustainability of K–20 education reform.

Featured Blog: 

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Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Science Fairs Under the 'Scope Study Flyer

Tue, 11/18/2014

Author(s): 

Abigail Jurist Levy, Marian Pasquale, Jackie DeLisi, Leana Nordstrom, Tracy McMahon

This flyer describes EDC's four-year, National Science Foundation-funded national study of science fairs.  A study of science fairs of this scope has not been conducted in the U.S. before, and the findings have the potential to increase the effectiveness and reach of science fairs, to provide science educators—both formal and informal—with cost-effective ways of bringing the Next Generation Science Standards science and engineering practices to their students, and to provide researchers with tools for assessing the science and engineering practices.

Science Fairs Under the 'Scope Overview

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Length: 

1 page

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Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide

Tue, 07/01/2014

Author(s): 

Tony Streit, Deidre Searcy, Wendy Rivenburgh, Kate Goddard, Gabby Silva, Daryl Bergman

This guide is intended to both orient and support educators in creating, planning, and implementing innovative media projects with young people. The guide offers a road map for these learning experiences and provides educators with planning tools, examples, and tips that will help launch and sustain effective youth media programs. While it challenges users to develop their own approach, the guide is also meant to inspire readers with examples of successful projects from around the globe. 

Guide Cover

Length: 

96 pp.

Publication Type: 

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

EDC to Study Role of Social Media in Public Science Discourse

Photo of Daniel Light

EDC has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the role of social media in public science discourse. The new study represents a significant advance in social media research. To date, much of the existing literature on social media tools, such as Twitter, has involved quantitative analysis of the number of followers and has focused on the volume, rather than the nature, of the communication. In contrast, EDC's study will examine how the public understands and uses information shared by respected science institutions via social media.

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Wendy Rivenburgh

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Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

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Wendy Rivenburgh

First name: 

Wendy

Last name: 

Rivenburgh

Bio: 

Wendy Rivenburgh is an expert in youth media education, technical support, communications, community building, and instructional design. To all of her work, she brings a deep commitment to empowering learners, supporting the creation of original works for a social purpose, and, in particular, tapping the potential of children and youth as the next generation of leaders and innovators.

Rivenburgh manages communications for the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services to ensure that low-income children have increased access to high-quality learning experiences.  She is responsible for strategic outreach and dissemination of materials, and serves as lead editor for NCASE products, including new and adapted print and electronic resources.

Rivenburgh previously led communications for Adobe Youth Voices (AYV), a project dedicated to working with educators and young people to apply their creative skills to solving real-world problems. The overarching goal was to increase creativity in education and equip youth media-makers to create social change through the power of digital storytelling.

In close collaboration with the Adobe Foundation, Rivenburgh developed a wide array of online and print communications that advance the AYV mission. She was the lead writer of an app about AYV, The AYV Story, which provides a moving, close-up view of the experiences of AYV youth media makers and educators. She was also the lead developer of the interactive AYV Program Guide, co-developed numerous curricular resources—including the video narrative curriculum, Moment of Truth—and was the author and editor of the AYV collection of program stories that highlights the experiences of participating youth and educators around the world.

Rivenburgh has contributed her skills to numerous other technology-infused youth development initiatives at EDC, including YouthLearn and the creation of a technology curriculum database for the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning at SEDL. She is the co-author of a chapter, “Working in Afterschool,” which shares lessons learned from the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, as well as a report on the ITEST Convening, Defining an Afterschool Research Agenda.

Before joining EDC, Rivenburgh taught English literature and writing courses at the high school and college level, and worked with young people in academic enrichment and other extracurricular activities.

Rivenburgh received her BA from Middlebury College and her MA in English from Boston College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2159

Jim Diamond

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Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Jim Diamond

First name: 

Jim

Last name: 

Diamond

Bio: 

Jim Diamond is an educational researcher and instructional designer in the field of digital media and learning, focused primarily on the use of educational games to enrich K–12 learning and teaching for students and teachers. He is especially interested in applying design-based research methods in his work to create and study technologies that foster individual learner agency in real-world learning settings. He brings extensive experience in educational research, design, and evaluation, and his areas of interest include history, social studies, and civics education; STEM education; and disciplinary literacy.

Diamond is currently the principal investigator (PI) of Playing with Data: Developing Digital Supports for Middle School Science Teachers Using Game-Based Formative Assessment, a three-year National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded DRK–12 project. This exploratory research and development project is investigating how teachers use data from video gameplay to make inferences about student learning and changes to instruction in the area of argumentation, as well as how “educative curriculum” materials can be designed to help teachers strengthen their data-driven decision making practices.

As the PI of a three-year NSF-funded ITEST project entitled Investigating Digital Badges as Alternative Credentials to Broaden STEM Participation Among Underrepresented Youth, Diamond is developing and studying a credentialing process called Design League Badge Portfolios. Digital badges are validated indicators of accomplishment or skill that are stored and managed online and can be earned in informal or formal learning environments.The process will give underserved youth a technology-supported method for presenting their Information Communication Technology (ICT) achievements in an out-of-school program in ways that are personally meaningful and that address the expectations of higher education institutions. Digital badge systems have the potential to become alternative credentialing methods.

Diamond has led and contributed to numerous evaluations of initiatives that use technology to better engage, motivate, and educate students. Recently, he served as the lead evaluator of iDesign, a collaborative NSF-funded R&D initiative led by Hofstra University that focused on building underrepresented students’ technological fluency and increasing their interests in STEM-related activities and careers using a culturally-relevant game design curriculum.

His research also addresses innovative uses of technology in the area of teacher professional development. He was the principal investigator of two studies, funded by the MacArthur Foundation’s HASTAC Digital Media and Learning Initiative, that examined the use of a digital badge system in an online professional development program for history teachers. And, he served as the senior instructional designer on the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation-funded Zoom In, an online tool that supports teachers in building students' literacy skills as they learn U.S. history .

Diamond is an adjunct professor at New York University, where he teaches courses in the principles of game-based learning and research methods to investigate game-based learning. Prior to joining EDC, he designed professional development programs for teachers in the area of educational technology. He began his career teaching elementary school. Diamond has a BA in History and an EdM in Educational Technology from Boston University, and a PhD in Educational Communication and Technology from New York University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4256

Christina Bonney

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Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

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Christina Bonney

First name: 

Christina

Last name: 

Bonney

Bio: 

Christina R. Bonney leads research that studies school reform, student motivation, and strategies to enhance learning, teaching, and student achievement. She contributes her expertise in quantitative and qualitative research design, survey design and administration, and data analysis to a wide range of studies that examine both in-school and out-of-school time (OST) learning.

Bonney is the co-Principal Investigator of a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project which is developing an observation protocol focused on evaluating the quality of technology implementation in high school science classrooms. She is also evaluating the STEM Guides project, an initiative that is seeking to increase the frequency and depth of OST STEM experiences for youth in rural communities in Maine, with an overarching goal to create a national model for STEM capacity-building in rural areas.

Recently, Bonney conducted an evaluation of a Common Core-aligned Algebra curriculum in Connecticut, and contributed to a research study on the effectiveness of technology-focused professional development in the NSF's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program. For the REL Northeast & Islands at EDC, Bonney conducted a policy scan on career readiness policies and program components in the U.S. to help inform the U.S. Virgin Islands’ college and career readiness initiatives. She also participated in a scan of services and targeted programs in the Northeast offered for students who have recently immigrated to the U.S. from non-English speaking countries.

Bonney has co-authored several journal articles and book chapters, including: Examining the Quality of Technology Implementation in STEM Classrooms: Demonstration of an Evaluative Framework (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); "WICS: A Model for College and University Admissions," published in a special issue of Educational Psychologist that she co-edited; and “Learning to Think Critically” (chapter published in The Handbook of Research on Learning and Instruction).

Prior to joining EDC, Bonney was a senior researcher at the PACE Center at Tufts University, conducting research on the relationship between intelligence and college admissions. Previously, she spent two years with Learning Point Associates (now AIR), conducting program evaluations aimed at school improvement efforts in New York, New Hampshire, Ohio, South Carolina, and Texas. There, she also helped provide analytic support for afterschool programming in the 50 states and Puerto Rico, under the 21st Century Community Learning Centers initiative.

Bonney has conducted numerous research studies focused on student motivation in both education (K–16) and sport domains. She wrote her doctoral dissertation on the influence of achievement goal orientation on subsequent motivation and performance among college athletes.

She received a BA in Psychology from Yale University, an MS in Developmental Psychology, and a PhD in Education and Psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2486

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