Professional Development

Finding Meaningful Ways to Recognize Teachers’ Crucial Work

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EDC Senior Project Director Rebecca Lewis is an expert in STEM education, integration of academic and career education, teacher development, and high school reform. Rebecca leads initiatives that get students excited about STEM learning in formal and informal learning settings, while giving them the tools to succeed in and beyond school. Currently, as the Director of EDC's Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE) Program Office, Rebecca is guiding an EDC team in providing technical assistance to the ABE Program's sites and participating teachers. In this post written in celebration of National Teacher Appreciation Week 2017 (May 8-12, #ThankATeacher), Rebecca shares some thoughts on the importance of finding ways to honor and support teachers that go beyond an apple and a pat on the back. She suggests that one great way to go is to follow the ABE Program’s lead and ask teachers how they would like to be recognized.

 

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EDC and Crystal Bridges Launch New Online Scholar Program

Kirsten Peterson

With help from EDC, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art has launched the Crystal Bridges Online Scholar Program, an all-expense-paid, four-week course for arts and humanities educators who work with learners in grades 9 and up. Applications for the first session in summer 2017 are due April 25. Applications for the second session in late summer/early fall 2017 are due June 30.

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Kelley O'Carroll

Email Kelley O'Carroll

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Kelley O'Carroll

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Kelley

Last name: 

O'Carroll

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Kelley O’Carroll brings extensive experience in education, program evaluation, and research in child development and family engagement to her work in early childhood education.  She applies her efforts to programs for both institutional and at-home environments.

O’Carroll serves as the Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Technical Assistance Coordinator for the Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE) project, which provides support data, CQI systems, and evaluations of statewide home-visiting projects, and other topics to grantees funded under the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program.  She also evaluates the Rhode Island Center for Early Learning Professionals’ work with the Rhode Island State Pre-K Program.

Previously at EDC, O’Carroll participated in evaluations of large-scale state and national initiatives, including the Rhode Island Center for Early Learning Professionals, the Washington State Race-to-the-Top Early Learning Challenge, and the Head Start New Director Coaching Initiative. In these roles, she designed qualitative and quantitative measurement tools, conducted interviews and focus groups, analyzed data, and contributed to reports of findings.

She was also part of the Engaging Families to Promote Young Children’s Early Mathematics Learning and Mastery Motivation study funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation. The study examined whether engaging families in at-home family mathematics activities promotes children’s learning outcomes. In her role, O’Carroll co-created family engagement professional development (PD) materials and programs for Head Start teachers, and managed communications with teachers and parent participants. 

O’Carroll is co-author of several publications on the impact of family-focused interventions in early education, including Social support through social capital: A model of a parent support group for mothers in an urban Head Start and Family Connections: An approach for strengthening early care systems in facing depression and adversity. She has also contributed to the chapter, “Family Engagement” in Children of 2020: Creating a Better Tomorrow.

Prior to joining EDC, O’Carroll was an evaluator with Family Connections, a preventive mental health intervention in Head Start. She also worked with the Harvard Family Research Project, where she managed the Family Involvement Network of Educators and contributed to evaluation of National Parental Information and Resource Center Coordination Centers.

O’Carroll began her career as a teacher in Boston and has worked with students and families in a range of settings, including English-as-a-Second-Language schools, a family literacy program, and undergraduate and graduate programs in the US and abroad. She also served as the Family Coordinator for the Language and Social Communication Research Program at the Boston University School of Medicine.

O’Carroll received a BA in English from Mount Holyoke College and both an EdM in Human Development and Psychology and an EdD in Human Development and Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education. She was a recipient of a Head Start Graduate Student Research Grant from the U.S. Administration for Children and Families. 

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Staff Profile

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Research Associate II

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43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

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617-835-4234

Review of the Books Some Applications of Geometric Thinking and Moving Things Around

Fri, 03/24/2017

Author(s): 

Bowen Kerins, Darryl Yong, Al Cuoco, Glenn Stevens, Mary Pilgrim

Published in The College Mathematics Journal, this review by Thomas Dick of Oregon State University has high praise for the books Some Applications of Geometric Thinking and Moving Things Around co-authored by Bowen Kerins, Darryl Yong, Al Cuoco, Glenn Stevens, and Mary Pilgrim.

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7 pp.

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Engineering for Every K–12 Student: A Landscape Analysis of K–12 Engineering Education in the Greater Boston Region

Fri, 04/01/2016

Author(s): 

Daryl Williams (Tufts University), Catherine McCulloch, Tracy McMahon, Leslie Goodyear

This landscape study, funded by the National Science Foundation and developed collaboratively by EDC and Tufts University, takes a look at the state of K–12 engineering education in the Greater Boston region. Through targeted interviews with and a survey of Boston-area stakeholders, the authors aimed to learn where stakeholders’ interests overlap and where needs exist. The analysis was augmented by a review of literature and websites.

Engineering for Every K-12 Student: A Landscape Analysis

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80 pp.

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Pilar Gonzalez

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Pilar

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Gonzalez

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Pilar Gonzalez is an experienced educational researcher who is committed to using formative and summative research to gather evidence about educational interventions that promote educational equity and academic achievement for struggling students. Her main areas of interest and expertise are educational technology, English Language Learners, and content-area literacy.

Gonzalez leads the iZone Short-Cycle Evaluation Challenge, an evaluation project for the New York City Department of Education’s Office of Innovation to help the Department and its educators evaluate and pilot education technology tools in the classroom and build their capacity for evaluative thinking. She also leads the research portion of Playing with Data, a study funded by the National Science Foundation that is supporting teachers in data-driven decision-making.

Previously, Gonzalez managed research projects about social studies and science education, teacher professional development, early childhood education, digital micro-credentials, tablets in schools, and educational video games.

Gonzalez is co-author of a chapter about digital micro-credentials for teachers, “Digital Badges for Professional Development: Teachers’ Perceptions of the Value of a New Credentialing Currency,” published in Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials.

Before joining EDC, Gonzalez taught English as a Second Language in New York City schools, and worked as a research and policy intern at New Visions for Public Schools, a non-profit school support and charter management organization. 

Gonzalez received a BA in History and Science from Harvard University, an MA in Sociology and Education/Education Policy from Teachers College at Columbia University, and an MS in Education/Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Long Island University.  She is certified in Project Management in Development (PMD Pro).

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, New York 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4208

Katrina Bledsoe

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Katrina Bledsoe

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Katrina

Last name: 

Bledsoe

Bio: 

Katrina Bledsoe brings extensive experience as an evaluator of programs at the local, state, and federal government levels. Bledsoe leads evaluations of initiatives focused on curriculum development in the sciences and social sciences, teacher professional development, and mental health issues such as suicide prevention. Her expertise is in community-based education and social services program evaluation, mixed methodology and methods, research innovation, applied social psychology, and cultural contexts.

Bledsoe provides technical assistance to grantees under the National Science Foundation (NSF) INCLUDES program, which is working to identify and scale up proven, innovative ideas to create access to science and engineering for groups traditionally underrepresented in those fields.  Additionally, she is a member of the team evaluating NSF’s Broadening Participation in Computing-Alliances Program, as well as a Project Lead for the REL Northeast & Islands.

Previously, Bledsoe has served as principal investigator, co-principal investigator, or project director on a variety of projects, including including leading a study exploring parental engagement in the North Corridor community of Charlotte, North Carolina; serving as an evaluation scientist for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center; and leading an evaluative qualitative outcome study focused on technology tools for teachers and students in India, using EDC’s Interactive Radio Initiative Program.

Bledsoe is the author of chapters, articles, and blog posts focusing on evaluation practice, mixed methodology and evaluation, and cultural responsiveness in evaluation, social psychology, and other topics. She has published articles in the American Journal of Evaluation ("The Use of Multiple Evaluation Approaches in Program Evaluation") and Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Science and co-authored the chapter “Decolonizing Evaluation in a Developing World: Implications and Cautions for Equity-Focused Evaluations” in Evaluation for Equitable Development Results. Her work has also been published in New Directions in Evaluation, Families in Society, and in numerous edited volumes including, among others,  Qualitative Inquiry in the Practice of Evaluation, the International Handbook of Urban Education, the Handbook of Mixed Methods Research, and the Handbook of Ethics for Research in the Social Sciences.

Bledsoe is the 2013 winner of the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) Multiethnic Issues in Evaluation Topical Interest Group’s Scholar Award and the 2006 winner of the Eastern Evaluation Research Society’s Invited Author Award. She is an active member of AEA, where she has served on the Board of Directors and held other leadership positions, including her current role on the Evaluation Policy Task Force. She sits on the editorial board for the Journal of Multi-Disciplinary Evaluation and is a peer reviewer for both the American Journal of Evaluation and the Journal of Evaluation and Program Planning as well as the journal, Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice, and Policy. Bledsoe is also a member of the Association for Psychological Science, and the Society for the Study of Psychological Issues.

Before re-joining EDC, Bledsoe served as a founding member and senior research director at ThinkShift, an initiative of the DeBruce Foundation. She received a BA from the University of California-Santa Cruz, an MA from San Francisco State University, and a PhD from Claremont Graduate University.

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Loraine Lucinski

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Loraine Lucinski

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Loraine

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Lucinski

Bio: 

Loraine Lucinski brings extensive experience in designing, implementing and evaluating child wellness programs and systems change initiatives at both the local and state levels.  She is committed to motivating others to tackle complex challenges, drive transformational innovations, and develop and implement systems solutions that positively impact children’s health, development and well-being.

Lucinski serves as Senior Project Director for the Home Visiting – Improvement Action Center Team (HV-ImpACT), which provides training and technical assistance—including site visits, webinars, and communities of practice—to Federal Home Visiting Program grantees at the state and territorial level.

Previously, Lucinski served as Deputy Director for Child Health for the Division of Family Health and Wellness in the Tennessee Department of Health, where she was responsible for the leadership, operational oversight, and evaluation of the state’s Early Childhood Initiatives; Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs; and Perinatal, Infant and Newborn Care Sections. She represented the Tennessee Department of Health on the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet and related committees, and was appointed to serve on a number of high-level interdepartmental advisory committees.

Lucinski began her career as an early interventionist, providing family-based therapy to children from birth to age three with developmental disabilities or at risk for delays due to environmental factors. Prior to joining state government, she started one of the first Early Head Start programs in the country and provided training and technical assistance to a number of federally funded early childhood programs in the six Midwest states. She was named the 2017 Jim Pryor Child Advocate of the Year by the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, in recognition of her contributions to the well-being of children in Tennessee. 

Lucinski received a BA in Developmental Psychology and Biology from the University of Illinois in Chicago, and an MPH in Public Health and graduate certificates in Child Development and Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology from Emory University.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Mailing Address: 

1025 Thomas Jefferson Street, NW, Suite 700 West
Washington, DC  20007

Telephone: 

202-572-3714

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