Professional Development

Matt McLeod

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Matt McLeod

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Matt

Last name: 

McLeod

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As a teacher, teacher leader, and instructional coach, Matt McLeod brings extensive experience in student and adult learning and teaching strategies. Understanding that doing mathematics is much more than applying procedures and completing calculations, McLeod has worked to improve teachers’ content knowledge and hone their instructional strategies to help develop their students into true mathematicians. He is highly experienced in designing and providing professional development to teachers and district leaders in mathematical content, curriculum and pedagogical best practices.

McLeod’s work is focused largely on the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M).  A contributor to Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards and to Learning and Teaching Algebra, McLeod has co-authored many resources designed to help teachers understand the Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP) and recognize these in student work. Through other projects, he has worked with teachers and district leaders to help shift mathematics instruction to be more aligned with the rigor and expectations of the CCSS-M. 

Currently, McLeod is expanding his horizons by leading a project to develop K–2 formative assessment tasks. This work is being done for PARCC and their non-summative assessment team. McLeod is also part of the Designing for Equity by Thinking in and about Mathematics (DEbT-M) project, which is working with teachers to change their current educational systems, particularly in their mathematics classrooms, to be more equitably accessible to all students. Recently, he joined the Math For All study team and is engaged in an effort to examine the efficacy of a PD program designed to improve teachers’ ability to reach learners of all abilities.

McLeod is also adjunct faculty at Northeastern Illinois University, where he is an instructor in the MSTQE (Math, Science, and Technology for Quality Education) program preparing the next generation of middle-school math and science teachers. Through this program, he is also serving on a committee to establish a new set of teacher qualification standards for Illinois.

Prior to joining EDC in 2012, McLeod held many roles in Chicago Public Schools (CPS), including middle-grades mathematics and reading teacher, Grade 8 algebra instructional coach (in collaboration with EDC, using CME Project Algebra I), and district math specialist. In his final year with CPS, McLeod led a team to design a plan and all of the subsequent components to help CPS transition to the CCSS-M.

McLeod has a BS in Industrial Engineering from Northwestern University and an MEd in Educational Leadership from University of Illinois–Chicago.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

770 N. Halsted Street, Suite 205
Chicago, IL 60642

Jessica Juliuson

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Jessica Juliuson

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Jessica

Last name: 

Juliuson

Affiliation/Organization: 

EDC

Bio: 

Jessica Juliuson specializes in supporting districts and schools in making systemic changes to ensure students acquire the skills and knowledge to thrive in a 21st century economy and to be effective participants in a democratic society. To this work she brings more than 20 years of experience in advancing innovations in instructional design and teacher development that enhance students’ learning, improve their academic achievement, and prepare them for college and careers.

As a professional developer, Juliuson plays a key role in the Ford Next Generation Learning (NGL) initiative’s efforts to transform teaching and learning, the high school experience, and business and civic engagement.  As a member of Ford NGL’s National Leadership Team supporting a national network of Ford NGL communities, she strengthens collaboration between schools and local communities and industries as one of the lead developers and facilitators of Community Connected Learning. 

With EDC’s Nellie Mae District Level Systems Change (DLSC) team, Juliuson provides assistance to DLSC districts using a networked improvement community approach to deepen and scale student-centered learning. She also co-developed a curriculum to support scaling up effective practices in high schools as a member of the National Center on Scaling Up Effective Schools.

Juliuson’s work focuses on empowering educators to be agents of change in their schools and communities. She is developing and managing a pilot international teacher recognition project for the Amgen Foundation’s ABE Program Office at EDC. Juliuson serves as a member of a national professional development planning team for the National Career Academy Coalition (NCAC), with the goal of facilitating adult learning using user-centered design principles and processes. As the lead writer for the Law and Justice program, Juliuson co-developed an innovative curriculum that engages and empowers students through authentic projects based on issues of power, fairness, and equity. Recently, Juliuson co-authored the EDC publication In Support of Educators: Strategies That Work. She is a member of the National School Reform Faculty and a trained Critical Friends Group coach.

Juliuson believes in the power of partnerships to advance systemic changes in education. She has collaborated with ConnectEd California, the California Department of Education, the California State Bar Association, Calamari Educational Productions, Vanderbilt University, and the Lastinger Center at the University of Florida. She has also worked with Philadelphia Academies, Inc. to support the development and sustainability of wall-to-wall academies in Philadelphia, and is a co-developer of the Innovators’ Institute, a unique fellowship model for Philadelphia partners to collaborate across organizations for youth empowerment.

Prior to joining EDC, Juliuson worked as a whole school change coach in the Boston Public Schools. As a consultant for several other large urban school districts, she partnered with leaders and educators to align curriculum, build professional learning communities, support the use of data to improve instruction, and develop strategic plans. Earlier in her career, she was a high school social studies and law teacher and provided technical assistance and coaching to Grade K–12 teachers and administrators.

Juliuson received a BA in History from Hamilton College and an MA in Teaching from the University of New Hampshire.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Training and Technical Assistance Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2630

Babette Moeller

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Babette

Last name: 

Moeller

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Babette Moeller focuses on the development of and research on educational programs across the curriculum that help ensure elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students with disabilities are included in and benefit from educational reform efforts. As project director of numerous EDC R&D initiatives, she contributes her extensive experience designing and implementing technology-supported programs in general and special education, providing professional development for teachers and administrators in a variety of settings, and conducting formative and summative evaluation research.

Moeller is the Principal Investigator of an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study that is testing the impact of Math for All—a professional development program developed by EDC and Bank Street College of Education and published by Corwin Press—on teachers and students from Chicago Public Schools. Shown to have promise to positively affect teachers and students, Math for All prepares K–5 teachers to help students with diverse strengths and needs—including those with disabilities—achieve high-quality, standards-based learning outcomes in mathematics.

Recently, Moeller led a study of the impact of PBS LearningMedia on teachers' classroom practices, the quality of instruction, and student learning. Her team's findings indicate that PBS LearningMedia's digital content positively impacts student content knowledge and critical thinking practices when integrated into existing curriculum; teachers who participated in the study overwhelmingly reported that PBS LearningMedia made positive contributions to their classroom practices.

An active member of professional teacher organizations, Moeller represents EDC’s Center for Children and Technology within 100Kin10, a national network of organizations devoted to adding 100,000 more highly qualified STEM teachers to America’s classrooms by 2021. Moeller is also the Past President of Science Education for Students with Disabilities (SESD), a professional group affiliated with the National Science Teacher Association (NSTA). She is a proposal reviewer for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education and contributes to expert panels and serves on national advisory boards. She is an adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and has taught courses in technology integration, media research, and child development at Fordham University's Graduate School of Education and the New School for Social Research.

In 2016, Moeller presented sessions at the 13th International Conference on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) in Hamburg, Germany, and she regularly presents at the annual conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Council, the Council for Exceptional Children, and Learning Forward. Her recent publications include: "The Benefits of Undergraduate Research Fellowships for Students with Disabilities” (CUR Quarterly); "Building Relationships, Sharing Resources, and Building Opportunities: A STEM Learning Community Builds Social Capital for Students with Disabilities" (Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability); Integrating Technology with Student-Centered Learning; "Universal Design for Learning: Facilitating Access and Participation for All Students"; and "Making Standards-Based Mathematics Accessible to Students with Disabilities."

Moeller holds a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the New School for Social Research.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4205

Bill Tally

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Bill Tally

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Bill

Last name: 

Tally

Bio: 

Bill Tally leads education R&D initiatives that advance the field's knowledge of how the strategic use of digital tools can make learning more rigorous, meaningful, and engaging. He brings deep expertise in interdisciplinary learning, the digital humanities, formative research, historical studies, and the sociology of education—as well as experience configuring digital archives to enable students, teachers, and the public to do authentic historical inquiry.

Tally is the principal investigator of Zoom In! Teaching Science with Data, an initiative to build high school students’ skills in using data to investigate significant problems in biology and earth science. This initiative draws upon EDC’s Zoom In, an online instructional platform named a 2016 Best Website for Teaching and Learning that Tally led the design and development of with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Tally is also leading an EDC team that is serving as the primary research collaborator for the Library of Congress's Teaching with Primary Sources program. On an ongoing basis, he conducts evaluations that help program developers assess and refine a wide array of initiatives focused on social studies, digital media resources, digital games and storytelling, the needs of diverse learners, and teacher professional development (view a full project list).

Recently, Tally headed up an effort to support the New York Philharmonic in expanding the reach of their Young People's Concerts, by developing an interactive website, Young People's Concerts Play! As co-Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation-funded eTG project, he collaborated on the design and testing of a prototype electronic teacher’s guide that helps teachers with varying knowledge and skills plan and teach a genetics curriculum, reflect on its execution, and enhance instruction.

Tally’s clients and partners have included the Library of Congress, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The New York Times, National Geographic, WNET, City University of New York, the Smithsonian Institution, MIT, Carnegie Hall, the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Chicago History Museum, and Bank Street College of Education.  

He presents his research at the conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Association (“The Technology Literacy Inventory: Assessing Teacher Candidates’ Readiness to Teach All Students”) and the International Society for Technology in Education (“Using Historical RPGs to Teach History Content and Critical Thinking Skills”).

Tally co-authored the book The New Media Literacy Handbook: An Educator’s Guide to Bringing New Media into the Classroom. He has also published on the use of digitized primary sources to foster historical thinking (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); the role of digital tools in enlivening social studies learning and teaching (Theory and Research in Social Education); and how history games can help engage students in historical thinking (National Historic Education Clearinghouse).

He received a BA in psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz and an MA in liberal studies from the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research (with an emphasis on American cultural history). He holds a PhD in sociology from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where his dissertation examined children’s and parents’ use of the Web in low- and middle-income homes.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4206

Jeff Winokur

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Jeff Winokur

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Jeff

Last name: 

Winokur

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Jeff Winokur is a nationally recognized expert in designing and delivering science professional development, and has taught pre-service and in-service courses in the teaching of science to children. He has consulted to early childhood programs and elementary schools throughout New England, providing professional development for teachers on appropriate science teaching and programming for children from Pre-K through Grade 5.

Currently, Winokur works on EDC's Literacy and Academic Success for English Learners through Science (LASErS) program, designing and facilitating professional development that integrates science and literacy for PreK, Kindergarten and Grade 1 teachers in Hartford, Connecticut. In addition, he is the elementary science advisor to EDC’s Computer Science STEM Integration and Collaboration Project (CS-STEM-IC).

Winokur is also an Early Childhood and Elementary Science Educator at Wheelock College, where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate level courses in the teaching of science to children ages 3–12. (Read a blog post by Winokur about the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and elementary science education.)

Recently, Winokur worked on EDC's Cultivating Young Scientists initiative, a three-year, Institute of Education Sciences (IES)–funded project that developed two science professional development programs for early childhood teachers in Connecticut. He also worked on the Connecting Science and Literacy Program, which led to the publications The Essentials of Science and Literacy and Science and Literacy: A Natural Fit.

Previously at EDC, Winokur was a member of the Center for Urban Science Education Reform (CUSER). He was a technical assistance team member for Fall River and Springfield, Massachusetts, and a staff trainer for the Worcester North Quadrant Initiative. Additionally, he was a member of the elementary team for the EDC K–12 Science Curriculum Dissemination Center, as well as one of the developers of The Young Scientist Series, an EDC project that developed early childhood science curriculum and training materials.

Winokur received a BS from the University of Pennsylvania and an MEd from Antioch University.

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Training and Technical Assistance Associate

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2516

Marian Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale

First name: 

Marian

Last name: 

Pasquale

Bio: 

Marian Pasquale has deep expertise in middle grade and high school science professional development, technical assistance, and curriculum development. She leads and co-leads numerous innovative science education initiatives and designs and leads professional development that focuses on integrating inquiry into standards-aligned science instruction.

Pasquale is the co-Principal Investigator of EDC's Science Fairs Under the 'Scope study, an in-depth investigation of science fairs in the U.S. that will provide new insights into if and how science fairs increase students’ interest in STEM and/or STEM careers, if and and how participation in select models of middle school science fairs enhance students’ mastery of the science and engineering practices, and the costs and resources required to implement an effective middle school science fair. She is also the science specialist for the Amgen Biotech Experience Program Office at EDC.

In her work for the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory that EDC co-leads, Pasquale authored and co-authored several publications focused on effective strategies to enhance STEM instruction and improve STEM learning outcomes for young children. These include: "Productive Struggle in Mathematics," "How Teachers Can Develop Formative Assessments That Fit A Three-Dimensional View of Science Learning," and "Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics."

Pasquale served as the Senior Science Curriculum Developer for EDC's National Research and Development Center on Educational Technology. In this capacity, she collaborated with colleagues to develop four digital games—and related professional development materials for teachers—that are designed to help improve students' understanding of phenomena that are often the subject of scientific misconceptions. Previously, she served as a professional development specialist for EDC's Foundation Science high school curriculum and was a senior curriculum writer for EDC’s Insights in Biology high school curriculum.

For several years, Pasquale has developed and led courses—including "Teaching Science Through the Inquiry Process" and "Project-Based Classroom Science"—for the Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair. In summer 2014, she designed and taught an Earth Science Professional Development Institute funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education.

Pasquale regularly presents on the topics of middle school science, assessment, science and literacy, and the use of games to enhance science learning. Recently, she has provided sessions at the National Science Teachers Association Annual Conference, the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association ("Using Students' Naive Theories to Design Games for Middle Grades Science"), the National Association for Research on Science Teaching Annual Conference, the WNET Celebration of Learning, and the Games, Learning, and Society Conference.

She is the co-author of the books Making Science Mentors: A 10-Session Guide for Middle Grades and Guiding Curriculum Decisions for Middle-Grades Science, as well as the articles "Providing School and District-Level Support for Science Education Reform" (Science Educator) and "Models of Providing Science Instruction in the Elementary Grades: A Research Agenda to Inform Policy Makers" (Science Educator).

Pasquale has consulted with public television in the development of the Learning Science Through Inquiry series funded by Annenberg/CPB. She has designed and conducted professional development and technical assistance for middle and high school administrators and teacher leaders throughout the nation, including the Portland (OR), New York City, Cambridge (MA), and Fort Wayne (TX) public schools. 

Before joining EDC, Pasquale was the K–6 Science Coordinator for the Haverhill. Massachusetts, Public Schools, where she was a seventh and eighth grade science teacher for over 20 years.

Pasquale received a BA from Emmanuel College and an MEd in Curriculum, Instruction, and Administration in Science Education from Boston College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2417

Johannah Nikula

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Johannah Nikula

First name: 

Johannah

Last name: 

Nikula

Bio: 

Johannah Nikula helps teachers make engaging and intellectually stimulating mathematical learning experiences available and accessible to all learners. She specializes in designing and studying models of professional development for mathematics teachers, with a particular focus on working with students from diverse backgrounds and those who possess varying degrees of proficiency in English.

Nikula is co–Principal Investigator of Visual Access to Mathematics: Professional Development for Teachers of English Learners, a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop and study a blended face-to-face and online course focused on visual representations and supports for language access. She is also a key contributor to the NSF-funded Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards initiative, which is developing online resources and professional development materials that support teachers’ understanding and use of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP).

Previously, Nikula was co-Principal Investigator on two projects focused on students who are English Learners (ELs). For the NSF-funded Mathematical Record Keeping Supports Cognition and Communication study, she examined features of mathematics tasks that promote student record-keeping and investigated how those task features support cognition and communication for students, in particular for English learners (ELs). For the Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Language Learners project, funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), she oversaw a team that developed and studied professional development materials for middle-grades mathematics teachers focused on enhancing the mathematical learning and academic language development of students who are ELs. Nikula has also served as an instructional coach for mathematics teachers of ELs. (To learn more about Nikula’s work with mathematics teachers of ELs, read the recently published book, Mathematical Thinking and Communication: Access for English Learners.) In addition, she was one of the lead developers of middle grades statistics education resources for the Measuring and Addressing Middle-Grades Misconceptions in Statistics project funded by the NSF.

Nikula’s articles appear in journals such as Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School ("Supporting English Learners—Lessons from Research") and Mathematics Teacher Educator ("Developing Teachers’ Knowledge of a Transformations-based Approach to Geometric Similarity"). She has co-authored numerous professional books and chapters about mathematics teacher professional development and mathematics teaching and learning. Examples include Mathematical Thinking and Communication: Access for English Learners; A Mathematics Leader’s Guide to Lesson Study in Practice; Fostering Geometric Thinking: A Guide for Teachers Grades 5–10; the chapter "Secondary School Students’ Proportional Reasoning" in Teaching and Learning Mathematics: Translating Research for Secondary School Teachers; and The Fostering Algebraic Thinking Toolkit: A Guide for Staff Development.

Nikula received a BA in psychology with a minor in mathematics from Middlebury College and an EdM from Harvard University Graduate School of Education with a focus on Technology in Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director II

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2542

Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca

Last name: 

Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis works to promote the integration of rigorous academic content with opportunities for students to develop essential skills necessary for success in postsecondary education and the workplace. She seeks to excite students about learning in formal and informal education settings, while giving them the tools to succeed in their educational pursuits and beyond.

Lewis is the Director of EDC's Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE) Program Office, in which capacity she leads the provision of technical assistance to support the innovative ABE Program's sites and participating teachers. Previously, she co-led the Ford Motor Company-funded Ford PAS project which developed—and provides technical assistance and professional development for—a program that has evolved from an academically rigorous high school curriculum integrating academic and career education into a comprehensive community-wide high school reform strategy (Ford Next Generation Learning).

She brings extensive expertise in developing a wide range of STEM curriculum and professional development materials, including modules for Ford PAS and curriculum development work for the middle school Zero Robotics programming competition (a NASA Summer of Innovation program). On a regular basis, she contributes her science content knowledge, teaching experience, and skills in research and materials development to advising projects on their efforts to design instructional resources and support for teachers.

Lewis has worked with schools, districts, corporate funders, and community-based partners on EDC programs. She created a hands-on guide for teachers on how to integrate gender equity into existing science curricula, and she assisted with the development of classroom scenarios and working papers on science and mathematics education. She is the author of "Engaging the Controversy in Science Education: Scientific Knowledge and Democratic Decisions."

She received a BS from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, an MAT in biology from Northeastern University, and a CAES from Boston College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2935

Nevin Katz

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Nevin Katz

First name: 

Nevin

Last name: 

Katz

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Nevin Katz, a former science teacher, brings experience in online interactive development, mathematics and science instructional design, and design and facilitation of blended learning courses for K–12 teachers.

Katz advances the goals of a wide variety of initiatives across the Learning and Teaching Division and throughout EDC. Drawing on his technical expertise—iOS app development, front-end web development, Drupal theming, and the use of art and animation to convey key concepts—he helps teams create interactive learning experiences that engage and inform target audiences. Recently, Katz contributed to the development of a website, "Exploring Infectious Diseases," for high school and college biology students, their instructors, and adult learners. 

Katz also served as a member of a team that designed and tested a prototype Electronic Teacher Guide (eTG) designed to support teachers in implementing curriculum.The eTG features Biology Learning Experiences, tools to support teachers in reflecting on their practice, and related resources on topics such as holding productive discussions in the science classroom and using formative assessment. In this initiative, he helped develop eTG animations and videos that support teachers’ “mindful modification” of core curriculum.

Katz's recent projects include developing interactive self-assessment activities used in an online art history course for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art that was awarded a 2015 Gold MUSE award by the American Alliance of Museums; the Health Moments: Preventing Illness iOS app for Head Start home visitors; HP Learning Initiative for Entrepreneurs (HP Life) e-learning; and Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide. For seven years, he has designed science interactives (“Exploring the Seasons”) and courses (“Using Technology to Explore Weather and Climate”) for EDC’s EdTech Leaders Online program and facilitated ETLO courses.

Katz is a co-author of the EDC publication In Support of Educators: Strategies That Work and the author/illustrator of the Dr. Birdley Teaches Science series of teacher resource books, which he developed outside of his work for EDC. The Massachusetts Department of Youth Services (DYS) has purchased and distributed the Dr. Birdley series to all of their educational programs across the state and incorporated it into the instructional guide for DYS science teachers. It is used in classrooms around the country and distributed abroad.

Prior to joining EDC, Katz was a science teacher for eight years and taught physical science, environmental science, biology, chemistry, and earth science at public and charter schools.  

Katz holds an EdM in teaching and curriculum from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BA in biology from Swarthmore College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Training and Technical Assistance Associate II

Program: 

EdTech Leaders Online

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2415

Pam Buffington

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Pam Buffington

First name: 

Pam

Last name: 

Buffington

Bio: 

Pam Buffington provides technical support in evidence based policy development and decisionmaking to state and local education agencies and is a project leader in the development and management of multiple professional development initiatives. She is an expert in technology integration in education with extensive work in the areas of mathematics and science, and has designed and implemented online and face-to-face professional development materials. As Co-Director of the Science and Mathematics Programs Unit, she leads a team of researchers, instructional designers, and professional developers in investigating and implementing strategies to improve students' learning outcomes.

Buffington is EDC's co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of the National Science Foundation-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory, an initiative focused on equity-oriented STEM education improvement. In this work, she leads a partnership with the Auburn, Maine School Department to improve student learning of mathematics in the early grades through the integration of interactive mobile technologies such as iPads. She has presented this work extensively at convenings such as the 13th annual International Congress on Mathematical Education and the conferences of organizations such as the National Rural Educators Association, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics.

As the co-PI of EDC's Visual Access to Mathematics study, Buffington is working with Mark Driscoll and Johannah Nikula to develop and study a blended-learning professional development program that will address the critical need to support middle-grades mathematics teachers in enhancing English learners' mathematics learning and promoting their college and career readiness. She also serves as a State Liaison and Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance Facilitator for the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded REL Northeast & Islands and a STEM technical assistance provider for Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) program grantees.

Buffington was the PI of the IES-funded Eliciting Mathematics Misconceptions: A Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment System, an initiative that developed and validated diagnostic formative assessments in the content area of rational numbers. She was also the Project Director for several initiatives, including the Maine Impact Study of Technology in Mathematics Intervention; the Enhancing and Extending the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives Project; SELECT Math Professional Development Intervention, Boston; and District Level Consultation–Standards-Based Mathematics Instruction. She also served as lead mathematics specialist in support of Maine’s Learning Technology Initiative.

In 2016, Buffington was selected to be the Richard H. Balomenos Lecturer by the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in New England (ATMNE) and presented the keynote “Strategic Use of Mobile Technologies as an Equity Move” at the ATMNE Conference. She also published her work extensively in 2016. She is a co-author of the chapter “Partnership-Based Research Approaches” in Rural Education Research: State of the Science and Emerging Directions, and co-authored the article “Enhancing Use of Learning Sciences Research in Planning for and Supporting Educational Change: Leveraging and Building Social Networks” (Journal of Educational Change). Through her work on the R+P Collaboratory, she has co-authored a series of briefs and reports on the role that interactive technology can play in enhancing mathematics learning, including Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics, Supporting Equity Through Co-Investigation: Sharing Student Videos, and Research+Practice Partnerships: Fostering Equitable Collaborations.

Before joining EDC, Buffington was the Director of Technology and Assessment Development for Learning Effects in Falmouth, Maine; a Project Director at TERC in Cambridge; and an adjunct faculty member at the Graduate School of Education, Instructional Technology Program, at Bridgewater State College. She has worked as a mathematics teacher and technology coordinator.

Buffington received a BS in secondary education and mathematics with a minor in Physics from University of Maine at Farmington, an MA in curriculum and instruction from Lesley College, and a PhD in education (integrating multicultural education, technology, and educational practice) from the Union Institute.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Co-Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

36 Brunswick Avenue
Gardiner, Maine 04345

Telephone: 

207-588-5022

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