Professional Development

Kevin Waterman

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Kevin Waterman

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Kevin

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Waterman

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Kevin Waterman brings significant expertise in instructional design, professional development, project management, and R&D. He specializes in the design and testing of innovation approaches to enhancing STEM education.

Waterman is a key member of several current EDC STEM initiatives, including: the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project “Broadening Participation of Elementary School Teachers and Students in Computer Science through STEM Integration and Statewide Collaboration.” In this STEM+C collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), EDC is developing a series of model curriculum units for grades 1-6 that integrate computational thinking into science and mathematics units. He is also the primary author of a middle school cybersecurity curriculum being developed for SAE, and is the mathematics and science subject matter expert in EDC's collaboration with Artists for Humanity on the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded STEAM Power project.

Previously, Waterman was a core writer on the NSF-funded CME Project, a four-year comprehensive high school mathematics program founded in problem-based, student-centered approaches to learning. He served as the editorial manager of the NSF-funded Linear Algebra and Geometry, a curriculum that teachers can use to challenge students who exhaust the mathematics offered by their school or that schools can build into their mathematics programs to provide an alternative to the typical sequence that ends with calculus. He also was a core writer on Developing Mathematical Practice in High School, a teacher professional development course funded by the Massachusetts DESE.

Waterman has led professional development seminars with teachers from the Boston Public Schools and with participants in Focus on Mathematics, an EDC-led partnership of teachers and mathematicians committed to increasing student achievement. He contributed “Mathematics Applied to Curriculum Development: Lessons Learned on the Job” for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 72nd Yearbook 2010.

Before joining EDC, he was Director of Product Marketing for HighPoint Systems and Principal Systems Engineer for Lotus Development Corp., working on knowledge management, news management, and computer-based training systems.

He received a BA in mathematics from Trinity College and an MAT in mathematics education from Boston University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2840

Mark Driscoll

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Mark Driscoll

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Mark

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Driscoll

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Mark Driscoll, a nationally recognized leader in mathematics education, designs instructional resources and professional development materials that build mathematics teacher's capacity to enhance students' understanding and improve their learning outcomes. For the past decade, his work has centered on professional development for algebraic thinking and geometric thinking, with a particular eye on teachers of English learners.

Driscoll is responsible for a portfolio of work across projects aimed at improving mathematics instruction through teacher professional development. Recently, he directed two research projects: the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)–funded Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Learners study and the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded Fostering Mathematics Success of English Language Learners study. Drawing upon findings from the latter study, he and his team have launched a free website that offers middle school mathematics teachers proven strategies to support English learners’ success: Mathematical Thinking: Supports for English Language Learners.

In recent years, Driscoll has had several collaborations with Horizon Research, Inc., with WestEd, with Boston College, and with Measured Progress.  He is the author and coauthor of numerous publications on teacher professional development, including Fostering Algebraic Thinking, Fostering Geometric Thinking, and accompanying toolkits all published by Heinemann.

Driscoll is the recipient of the 2010 Ross Taylor/Glenn Gilbert National Leadership Award from the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics. From 2003 to 2007, he sat ex officio on the board of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics as Editor of their Journal of Mathematics Education Leadership. Recently, he served on the IES What Works Clearinghouse team developing the Practice Guide Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 through 8.

Before joining EDC, Driscoll helped start and taught at an alternative high school in St. Louis, Missouri, Logos School.

Driscoll received his BA from Boston College and, as a student of Gary Jensen, his MA and PhD in mathematics from Washington University in St. Louis, with a specialization in differential geometry.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2508

Cindy Hoisington

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Cynthia Hoisington

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Cindy

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Hoisington

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Cindy Hoisington believes that authentic, cognitively challenging science experiences can be transformative for young children and their teachers. She brings to her work more than 20 years of experience teaching young children, developing educational materials, and instructing and mentoring early childhood teachers in language, literacy, and science education.

At EDC, she focuses on instructing and mentoring preschool teachers in science education research projects, and she has contributed to the development of inquiry-based science curricula and mentoring protocols as well as to teacher, classroom, and child science assessments. Currently, she is part of EDC’s team working on a four-year, $3 million U.S. Department of Education Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) project, Literacy and Academic Success for English Learners through Science (LASErS). Her previous work was on the Cultivating Young Scientists (CYS) project funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. (Read blog posts by Hoisington about her work with the National Association for the Education of Young Children's (NAEYC) Early Childhood Science Interest Forum and combatting implicit bias in the STEM classroom.)

Hoisington has directed projects aimed at getting children and adults exploring outdoors together; helping teachers use educational television to facilitate science learning; and supporting low-literacy families to scaffold children’s language development through everyday science explorations. She has customized science trainings for the State of Maryland, Family Place Libraries, United Way of Miami-Dade, University of Northern Iowa, National Education Association, National Head Start Association, and the Iowa Department of Education, and collaborated with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

Hoisington also develops and advises on digital media initiatives aimed at promoting STEM for children, families, and teachers. She is currently part of EDC’s Ready to Learn team working with PBS. Previously she was the science advisor for the Emmy-winning educational television series Curious George, for which she received recognition from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. She has also developed online science materials for Peep and the Big Wide World and The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot about That!

Among other publications, Hoisington is the author of “Implicit bias in the STEM classroom; how to start tackling the biases that hold students back in STEM,” and “Picturing What’s Possible—Portraits of Science Inquiry in Early Childhood Classrooms;” and coauthor of “Gimme an E! Seven strategies for supporting the ‘E’ in young children’s STEM learning; Supporting children’s science learning through water explorations”; “Building a classroom community that supports English learners in preschool”;  "Foundations of Science Literacy:  Efficacy of a Preschool Professional Development Program in Science on Classroom Instruction, Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge, and Children's Observations and Predictions," “The Science and Mathematics of Building Structures,” “A Walk in the Woods: A Partnership with an Arboretum Gets Preschoolers Outside and into Science,” and "The Importance of Executive Function in Early Science Education."

Before joining EDC, she was a preschool teacher and education supervisor for ABCD Head Start in Boston, where she gained a deep appreciation for the complex challenges faced by children and families in poverty and the teachers who work with them.

Hoisington received a BS in biology from the University of Massachusetts and an MEd from Bridgewater State College. She has done post-graduate work in math and science education at University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2823

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