Research and Evaluation

Wendy Martin

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Wendy Martin

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Wendy

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Martin

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Wendy Martin leads research that advances the field's knowledge of how key aspects of education programs influence impact and participant experience. She also conducts formative research and collaborative co-design projects that advance knowledge of how to design effective educational technologies and integrate them into educational environments to support student learning.

Martin is the Principal Investigator of IDEAS: Inventing, Designing, and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum. In this initiative, she is collaborating closely with New York Hall of Science, New York University, and teachers in New York City middle schools to adapt an engineering design program for students in autism inclusion settings. As Principal Investigator of the Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning project, Martin is investigating the relationships among game design, explicit analogy mapping techniques, and students’ understanding of complex science concepts. She is also a staff member on the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) and is conducting an evaluation of the CS4All initiative in New York City with colleagues at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Previously, Martin was project manager for Possible Worlds, a National Research and Development Center in Instructional Technology, funded by the US Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, which developed a suite of four digital games and related instructional materials for middle-school science. Possible Worlds was chosen by Common Sense Media for its list of the Top 25 Ed Tech products for 2014. She recently concluded evaluations of the ScratchEd program, which provides resources and professional learning experiences to help teachers integrate the Scratch graphical programming language into formal instruction.

Martin has contributed to seminal research that has advanced the field's knowledge of the role of technology in professional development. She was the Project Director of the evaluation of the eMINTS program, a technology professional development program that has reached hundreds of teachers and thousands of students in Missouri and has been scaled up to train thousands of teachers across the U.S. and Australia. As part of the team conducting the evaluation of the Intel Teach Essentials program—a technology professional development program that has reached millions of teachers worldwide—she provided evaluation guidance to evaluators and program managers in Asia, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East.

She has coauthored several articles and reports, including "Extending the Impact of Digital Games by Supporting Analogical Reasoning" (Proceedings of the 2015 Annual Symposium of Computer-Human Interaction in Play), "Testing the Impact of a Pre-instructional Digital Game on Middle-Grade Students' Understanding of Photosynthesis" (Technology, Knowledge and Learning);  "Connecting Instructional Technology Professional Development to Teacher and Student Outcomes" (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); and "Bringing Technology Professional Development to Scale: Lessons Learned from Intel Teach to the Future" (Policy Brief).

Martin earned her BA from Duke University, her MA from New York University¹s School of Education, and her doctorate from Cornell University.

Staff: 

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Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4287

Erin Stafford

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Erin Stafford

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Erin

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Stafford

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Erin Stafford has extensive experience working directly with formal and informal education practitioners and nonprofit professionals to design, refine, and evaluate education curricula, interventions, and professional development experiences. Stafford currently leads the evaluation efforts on the Home Visiting Improvement Action Center (HV-ImpACT), funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the evaluation of Maker/STEM Education Support for 21st Century Community Learning Centers, funded by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Sciences (IMLS). She is also helping to lead a Low-Cost, Short-Duration Randomized Control Trial in Michigan, “The Impact of an Orientation Course on Online Students' Completion Rates, funded by the Institute of Educational Sciences (IES).

With expertise in virtual learning, out-of-school time, informal education and STEM, Stafford has worked with various federal, state and municipal agencies as well as foundations, museums, schools and community organizations to answer their questions of policy and practice. Past experience includes serving as the analytic technical assistance manager for the REL Northeast & Islands at EDC. In that role, she guided practitioners in setting research agendas, helped build the capacity of state- and district-level practitioners to use data in their practice, and assisted school and district teams in incorporating continuous improvement processes into their decision-making. In her role as a researcher for both REL Northeast & Islands and REL Midwest, Stafford facilitated a research/practitioner alliance on virtual education and managed survey development projects, data collection efforts, and prototype and usability testing.

Stafford coauthored three IES publications on virtual education: Professional Experiences of Online Teachers: Training and Challenges, Online Course Use in Iowa and Wisconsin Public High Schools: Results of Two Statewide Surveys, and An Analysis of Student Engagement Patterns and Online Course Outcomes in Wisconsin. In addition, Stafford is the coauthor of a three-part IES series on survey methods for education practitioners and an article for the Journal of Online Learning Research, “Training for Online Teachers to Support Student Success: Themes from a Survey Administered to Teachers in Four Online Learning Programs.”

Before joining EDC, Stafford served as manager of research, evaluation and assessment for the Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana, and as an evaluator at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago. Stafford received her BA in Psychology and Religious Studies from Washington University in St. Louis. She has an MA in Social and Cultural Foundations in Education from DePaul University.

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Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

770 N. Halsted Street, Suite 205
Chicago, IL  60642

Telephone: 

312-962-4520

Diana Wogan

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Diana Wogan

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Diana

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Wogan

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Diana Wogan contributes her expertise in research, policy analysis, and school improvement to a wide range of initiatives. Working closely with key state and regional education leaders, she ensures that research and lessons learned by practitioners inform education policy to improve educational outcomes for all students.

Wogan leads a team in providing analytic technical support that ensures that research informs the day-to-day work in schools, school districts, state departments of education, and state capitals. She also contributes analytical expertise to the REL Northeast & Islands

With colleagues, Wogan provides technical support to grantees funded by the US Department of Education Investing in Innovation (i3) program. Her guidance advances i3 project leaders’ efforts to address education challenges such as turning around underperforming schools, educating English learners, and improving school culture and climate. She also provides technical support to grantees funded by the US Department of Education Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) program, particularly around stakeholder engagement and communication.

Before joining EDC, Wogan worked with the Boston Public Schools, helping schools with a longer day to use their time effectively in support of students and teachers. Prior to that, she served as Research Director for the Joint Committee on Education in the Massachusetts state legislature, where she helped draft legislation relating to school improvement and turnaround, and bullying prevention. In addition, Wogan advised members on education policy matters. She began her career as a community organizer in New Jersey, working with college students to advocate for student debt reform, urban renewal, and public health.

Wogan received a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan and an MA in Political Science from Northeastern University.  

 

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Job title: 

Project Director

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2462

Michelle Cerrone

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Michelle Cerrone

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Michelle

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Cerrone

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Michelle Cerrone focuses on the role of educational technologies and digital games in supporting student learning and teacher professional development. She specializes in research methods, survey development, and statistical analysis, which she applies across a range of evaluation, research, and development projects. Her most recent work examines the design of effective tools for educators and learners to promote progressive teaching and learning of STEM in pre-K through middle school settings.

Cerrone serves as the methodologist for Playing With Data, a three-year, National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project to support middle-grades science teachers in developing data literacy and interpreting and using game-based formative assessment data to enhance student learning. She is also a researcher on Bringing Science Home with PEEP, an NSF-funded project using Design Based Implementation Research (DBIR) to identify new avenues to bring early science experience to preschool children (ages 3-5), particularly those living in communities with few resources.

As an external evaluator for the Partnership to Improve Student Achievement in Physical Science: Integrating STEM Approaches (PISA2), Cerrone is investigating the impact of a science and engineering professional development program on elementary and middle-grades science teachers. She recently led survey development and validation for the TwISLE project, which explored how social media users interact with public science institutions on Twitter. 

Cerrone’s previous projects explored the successes and challenges of facilitating and participating in online communities of practice. She also was part of the Eliciting Math Misconceptions (EM2) project, an IES-funded measurement development project that designed a diagnostic assessment system to help teachers identify student misconceptions around rational numbers.

The co-author of several articles on professional development and instrument development, including "Constructing Online Communities of Practice"  and "Recruiting Research Participants via Twitter (or Social Media)," Cerrone regularly presents her findings at the annual conferences of national organizations such as the International Society for Technology in Education and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Before joining EDC, Cerrone worked as an analyst for Success Academy Charter Schools in New York City, where she designed assessments and analyzed student, classroom, and school-level data. She began her career in education teaching English as a Second Language in the Slovak Republic, Spain, and New York.

Cerrone received a BS from Cornell University and an MA in Economics and Education from Columbia University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4204

Jill Neumayer DePiper

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Jill Neumayer DePiper

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Jill

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Neumayer DePiper

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Jill Neumayer DePiper researches mathematics learning and teaching, with a special focus on identifying effective strategies to support the academic success of students who are learning English. She brings extensive expertise in research design, instrumentation, and analysis.

Currently, Neumayer DePiper is contributing to initiatives targeted to deepen mathematics teachers’ understanding of effective instructional practices for students who are English learners. She is a senior research associate on Visual Access to Mathematics (VAM), a project focused on designing professional development for mathematics teachers of English learners to support them in their use of visual representations for mathematical problem-solving and specific language strategies to support their students.

In a previous project, Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Learners (MCSEL), Neumayer DePiper designed and created materials for coaches to use with middle-grades mathematics teachers to improve teacher knowledge about how to support the problem-solving and communication of students who are English learners. In the Fostering Mathematical Success of English Language Learners project, a collaboration with Horizon Research, Inc., her team sought to better understand how to prepare teachers to support English learners in engaging in rich geometry tasks.

Neumayer DePiper is the coauthor of two articles published in Journal for Research in Mathematics Education:  “Teacher Characteristics Associated with Mathematics Teachers’ Beliefs and Awareness of Their Students’ Mathematical Dispositions” and “The Relationship Between Teachers’ Mathematical Content and Pedagogical Knowledge, Teachers’ Perceptions, and Student Achievement.” She has also published on the topics of mathematics teacher identity and the challenges of teaching and learning with high-stakes accountability contexts.

Before joining EDC, Neumayer DePiper served as a researcher and instructor in the Center for Mathematics Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has provided professional development for teachers, including courses specifically focused on instruction for English learners.

Neumayer DePiper was a recipient of the the Mid-Atlantic Center for Mathematics Teaching and Learning doctoral fellowship, an NSF-funded award to increase the number of graduate students who become leaders in mathematics education.

She received a BA in Environmental Studies from Davidson College, an MAT from George Mason University, and a PhD in Education, Curriculum, and Instruction from the University of Maryland.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2191

Amy Busey

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Amy Busey

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Amy

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Busey

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Amy Busey leads and contributes to a diverse array of initiatives that support teachers in ensuring students’ STEM proficiency and school, college, and career success. She brings significant experience in quantitative and qualitative research, strategic dissemination, and promotion of knowledge utilization. Her most recent work is deepening understanding of effective strategies to foster students’ data literacy and bridge STEM education research and practice.

As a member of EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute (ODI) team, Busey was a primary author of ODI’s Visualizing Oceans of Data report—a groundbreaking effort to provide guidelines to support interface and tool designers in bridging cyberinfrastructure to classrooms, enabling students to work with large, high-quality scientific datasets. She plays a key role in ODI’s Ocean Tracks project, which developed and tested powerful Web-based visualization and analysis tools derived from state-of-the-art knowledge about how to support student inquiry with data, and is currently engaged in related collaborative work with the Concord Consortium and the University of Minnesota on the CODAP (Common Online Data Analysis Platform).

Busey is also contributing to EDC’s R+P Collaboratory team’s efforts to identify, document, and disseminate ways that practitioners and researchers can work together effectively to enhance K–12 STEM education across formal and informal settings. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), this collaborative research/strategic dissemination work engages EDC in a partnership with the Auburn, Maine School Department to improve students’ math learning through integration of interactive mobile technologies. (Read her blog post based on this work.)

Her work to bridge STEM education research and practice in the R+P Collaboratory is one of several NSF-related dissemination efforts she has advanced. For CADRE (Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education), she provided online and print communications and networking facilitation support that helped NSF Discovery Research K–12 grantees make their findings and products accessible and usable. For NSF’s and EDC’s collaborative work to disseminate findings from the National Research Council’s report Successful K–12 STEM Education, she contributed to substantive and logistical planning of a series of STEM Smart events.  

Busey is the lead author of the article “Harvesting a Sea of Data” published in the Summer 2015 issue of The Science Teacher. She has co-authored many other articles, briefs, and reports including Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics (2015); A Targeted Study of Gaming and Simulation Projects in DRK–12 (2014); and Toward Sustainability: Cases and Cross-Case Analysis of the Strategies of MSP Project Leaders to Sustain their Teacher Leader Programs (2010).

Before joining EDC, Busey was involved in research efforts around Kindergarten readiness and infant cognitive development, implemented afterschool technology programs in middle schools, and worked to raise awareness around a variety of education issues.

Busey holds a BS in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an EdM in Mind, Brain, and Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4212

Carrie Liston

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Carrie Liston

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Carrie

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Liston

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Carrie S. Liston is dedicated to helping programs and organizations increase their effectiveness and impact on the world through evaluation. She collaborates with clients to design evaluations that fit the needs of their programs and ensures that findings are well understood to inform program decisions and provide evidence of impact.

Liston brings significant expertise in conducting evaluations of formal and informal programs that seek to promote equity in K–20 STEM education and increase diversity in STEM fields. Her quantitative and qualitative research also has a special focus on examining the efficacy of programs that provide educators with professional development.

Liston leads a wide range of evaluations at EDC, from studies of small, out-of-school time (OST) programs to complex investigations of national, multi-level initiatives. She is currently working on evaluations of the National Center for Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), committed to improving school-age care; a scale-up of the Techbridge after school program that engages girls in afterschool SET learning, and SciGirls Code, providing informal educators with training and curriculum to build computational thinking skills in girls. Liston conducted the evaluation for the National Girls Collaborative Project, which brings together organizations throughout the U.S. that are committed to informing and encouraging girls to pursue STEM careers and CS 10K: New Mexico Computer Science for All, a comprehensive teacher professional development program in computer science.

A skilled communicator of methods and findings, Liston shares her research with the field through reports, briefs, and presentations at the annual conferences of national organizations such as the American Evaluation Association and the American Educational Research Association. She is the lead author of Evaluating Promising Practices in Informal Information Technology (IT) Education for Girls and Evaluating Promising Practices in Informal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education for Girls. She has also coauthored articles published in Journal of Higher Education Outreach and EngagementJournal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, and CBE-Life Sciences Online.

Prior to joining EDC, Liston led STEM-related formative and summative evaluations for Evaluation & Research Associates, worked on qualitative-based evaluations at Ethnography & Evaluation Research, and conducted large-scale research projects for the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Liston holds a B.A. in Psychology from Occidental College and has a Master’s in Educational Psychology from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

206-659-5275

Megan Silander

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Megan Silander

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Megan

Last name: 

Silander

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Megan Silander conducts research that generates new insights into effective preK–12 education policies and programs. Her research interests include school and instructional improvement, accountability, and out-of-school time learning. She brings experience with qualitative data collection and analysis, experimental and quasi-experimental methods, and the analysis of extant and district administrative data.

Silander is the co-Principal Investigator of two National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded initiatives, "Zoom In! Learning Science with Data" and "Bringing Science Home with PEEP." She conducts research on Ready To Learn, a U.S. Department of Education-supported initiative led by PBS and CPB that EDC has studied for a decade and that has produced new findings on how to use transmedia resources to improve the school readiness of preschool children in low-income communities. She is also contributing her expertise to Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning, an NSF-funded study of how specific features of digital gameplay and subsequent instruction for middle-grade science learning can support consolidation and transfer of conceptual understanding beyond the game world.

She has coauthored several articles and chapters including, “Parent and Community Engagement and the Sustainability Challenge for Urban Education Reform” (in Education Reform in New York: Ambitious Change in the Nation’s Most Complex School System), “School Racial Composition and Young Children’s Cognitive Development” (in Integrating Schools in a Changing Society: New Policies and Legal Options for a Multiracial Generation), and “Instruction in High School: The Evidence and the Challenge” (The Future of Children).  She presents her findings at the national conferences of organizations such as Games+Learning+Society, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, CHI PLAY, and the American Educational Research Association.

Prior to joining EDC, Silander was a research scientist at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education and served as a deputy and policy analyst for a member of the Los Angeles Board of Education.

Silander holds a BA in linguistics from Pomona College, an EdM in international education policy from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a PhD in education policy from Columbia University. Her dissertation used quasi-experimental methods to examine the impact of school closure in New York City.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Fl
New York, New York 10014 

Telephone: 

212-807-4219

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