Research and Evaluation

Jacqueline Zweig

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Jacqueline Zweig

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Jacqueline

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Zweig

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Jacqueline Zweig conducts quantitative research that provides new insights into educator effectiveness, data use, and virtual education. She has expertise in all facets of research design and analysis, but specializes in statistical and econometric analysis.

Zweig manages applied research and evaluation studies for REL Northeast & Islands. She has conducted studies for three REL research alliances: Early Childhood Education Research Alliance, Northeast Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance, and Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance. She is also the Alliance Researcher for REL Midwest’s Virtual Education Research Alliance.  Recently, Zweig co-led the development of local assessment support resources for the Illinois State Board of Education, including online modules, assessment development workshops, an assessment review tool, and other supporting materials.

Zweig is the author of several publications, including “Professional experiences of online teachers in Wisconsin: Results from a survey about training and challenges”, “Online Course Use in New York High Schools: Results from a Survey in the Greater Capital Region,” “Teacher evaluation and professional learning: Lessons from early implementation in a large urban district," and “Writing Evaluative Feedback: A Tool to Support Teacher Learning and Growth.”

Before joining EDC, Zweig was the Director of Metrics at the New York City Department of Education's Office of Talent Research and Data. As the director, she developed quantitative methods to measure a teacher’s contribution to student learning, contributed to the design of a pilot teacher evaluation system, and supported the development of data systems related to teacher effectiveness initiatives.  She was a Massachusetts Education Policy Fellow in 2014/15 and is currently a Research Fellow for the Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute.

Zweig received her BA in Economics from Colby College and her PhD in Economics, with a concentration in Applied Microeconomics, from the University of Southern California.

 

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2884

Jessica Bailey

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Jessica Bailey

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Jessica

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Bailey

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Jessica Bailey provides research and analytic support in measurement, evaluation, and assessment . Currently, she provides research expertise for two REL Northeast & Islands research alliances—the Urban School Improvement Alliance and the Northeast Educator Effectiveness Research Alliance. She is the principal investigator for a study on the role of teacher characteristics in educator evaluation.

Bailey works closely with local and state education agencies in conceptualizing research studies and building the analytic capacity of their staff. She is skilled at translating results into non-technical language, and helps practitioners and policymakers understand the implications of the research findings. She has served as a lead content developer for an assessment literacy project for the state of Illinois, where she helped create a series of online modules and in-person professional development on developing high-quality assessments in traditionally non-tested grades and subjects. She also acts as an evaluator, providing evaluation services relating to educator evaluation systems.

Before joining EDC, Bailey was an Assessment Specialist for the Rhode Island Department of Education, where she was responsible for the design and implementation of an interim assessment system as part of the state’s Race to the Top grant.  In this capacity, she trained district leadership and educators on how to develop high-quality assessments and interpret the results. Additionally, she participated with district leadership and teams of teachers in professional development on data use in which teams collaboratively addressed educational data questions through a structured inquiry protocol.

Bailey received a BA in Education and a BA in Sociology from Brown University and a PhD in Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation from Boston College. The focus of her methodological dissertation was measuring teachers’ attitudes toward homeless students, in which she developed a scale using item-response theory.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2017

Courtney Arthur

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Courtney Arthur

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Courtney

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Arthur

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Courtney Arthur is a mathematics and science education instructional designer, researcher, and professional developer. She is currently advancing the goals of several projects targeted to enhance the quality and equity of mathematics education.

In "DEBT-M" (Designing for Equity by Thinking In and About Mathematics), Arthur is contributing to a study of the implementation of professional development (PD) designed to support teachers in addressing the opportunity gap in mathematics for marginalized high school students in urban school districts and to advance the field’s knowledge of effective strategies to close opportunity gaps.   

As a member of the team working on Assessing Secondary Teachers’ Algebraic Habits of Mind (ASTAHM), Arthur focuses on ways to identify and measure the mathematical habits of mind that secondary teachers use in their professional lives. She is responsible for collaborating on the paper-and-pencil assessment that has been developed to measure these habits of mind in teachers, as well as engaging in research that stems from a scientific approach to investigate the ways in which mathematical habits of mind are an indicator of teacher effectiveness. In addition, Arthur is working with EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute (ODI) to promote engagement in cross-conceptual work across mathematics and science.

In 2012, Arthur was selected to participate in the National Science Foundation’s CADRE (Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education) Fellowship program to further engage in the education research community. 

Before joining EDC, Arthur was an Algebra teacher and Math/Science Curriculum Coordinator for Chicago Public Schools. While working in Chicago, she focused on aligning curriculum to meet the needs of students in inner-city schools. In addition, Arthur was awarded several grants and was named a Fulbright Scholar. Prior to her career in education, Arthur practiced as a chiropractor in Chicago.

Arthur received an MAT in Elementary Education and an MEd in Curriculum and Instruction from National Louis University, as well as an MEd in Educational Leadership from American College of Education.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate II

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

770 N Halsted Street Suite 205
Chicago, IL 60642

Heather Lavigne

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Heather Lavigne

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Heather

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Lavigne

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Heather Lavigne brings expertise in children’s early learning, including specific expertise in research design and quantitative methodology. Her experience leading studies ranges from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to correlational analyses with panel data sets. She is trained in a variety of statistical techniques for modeling change over time, conducting latent variable analysis, and other key aspects of research and program evaluation. Lavigne has a special interest in advancing the field’s knowledge of the influences of media on early learning and children’s academic achievement.

Lavigne is the Co-Principal Investigator and Project Director for an NSF-funded collaboration between WGBH and EDC, Digital Media and Parent/Child Engagement Resources to Increase Preschool Computational Thinking. The project utilizes an iterative research and design process that supports the development of educational media and joint engagement activities geared towards developing computational thinking (CT) skills in preschool children. The research process will investigate how CT skills can be enriched through successive parent-child interactions. Lavigne is also the Co-PI for an NSF-funded STEM+C collaboration with WGBH that seeks to incorporate CT resources into math instruction for urban and rural preschools.

Lavigne also contributes her expertise to multiple studies designed to address the interests and priorities of the research alliances of the REL Northeast & Islands and REL Midwest. In 2016, she led a study on behalf of the REL Northeast & Islands Governing Board that examined principals’ tasks, responsibilities, and professional development activities and investigates how patterns of principals’ time spent may be related to school characteristics. This study resulted in the publication of Principals’ Time, Tasks, and Professional Development: An Analysis of Schools and Staffing Survey Data.

Lavigne has published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology and Infancy has published book chapters in Knowledge Development in Early Childhood: How Young Children Build Knowledge and Why It Matters and The International Encyclopedia of Media Studies

Prior to joining EDC, Lavigne served as the Director of Education at WGBY Public Television in Springfield, Massachusetts, where her responsibilities included the oversight of preK–16 initiatives focused on early childhood education, professional development, and classroom technology integration. During her time at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, she served as a statistics and research methodology consultant for the Center for Research on Families, where she supported faculty and graduate students in their processes of research design, statistical analyses, and interpretation of results. 

Lavigne received her BA in Communication from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, her MEd in Technology in Education from Harvard University, and an MS and PhD in Developmental Psychology with a concentration in Quantitative Methodology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Heidi Rosenberg

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Heidi Rosenberg

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Heidi

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Rosenberg

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Heidi Rosenberg is an expert in family engagement in children’s learning, early childhood education, and evaluation strategies to assess the impact of child- and family-serving programs. Her current work reflects the increasing recognition of the importance of early childhood interventions and the critical role of the birth-to-8 years in shaping children’s success in school and beyond, as well as the critical role of families and communities in promoting positive learning outcomes for children.

Rosenberg is the Principal Investigator (PI) of the study, Engaging Families to Promote Young Children’s Early Mathematics Learning and Mastery Motivation, funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation. Along with co-PIs Jessica Young and Kristen Reed, Rosenberg is examining whether engaging families in at-home family mathematics activities promotes preschool children’s learning outcomes in mathematics. A key component of the study is its emphasis on developing mathematics-focused family engagement strategies and materials that can be readily adopted and sustained by Head Start and other early childhood programs, without the need for ongoing external support.

Rosenberg also is the Director of Research for the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), funded by the Office of Child Care. In this capacity, she designs data collection strategies, analyzes state and regional data regarding school-age care policies and practices, helps develop training and technical assistance resources, and collaborates with federal, regional, and state school-age stakeholders to help promote families’ access to high-quality afterschool and summer programs for their school-age children.  In addition, Rosenberg serves as EDC’s liaison to the National Association for Family, School, and Community Engagement (NAFSCE), of which EDC is a founding partner.

Rosenberg’s previous research and evaluation projects include the OPRE-funded Child Care Collaboration Study and the OHS-funded National Center on Program Management and Fiscal Operations. She is the author/co-author of numerous articles on early childhood education, family engagement in children’s learning, and continuous program improvement, including: “State Policies and Practices Supporting Child Care for Infants and Toddlers,” “Bringing Families Into Out-of-School Time Learning” (Journal of Expanded Learning Opportunities), “Embracing the Use of Data for Continuous Program Improvement” (FINE Newsletter), and “Lessons from Evaluators’ Experiences with Scale” (The Evaluation Exchange).

Before joining EDC, Rosenberg was a Senior Research Analyst at Harvard Family Research Project, where she managed the Family Involvement Network of Educators. She also co-managed product development and evaluation work for the OHS-funded National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement and the USDE-funded Parent Information and Resource Centers.

Rosenberg received a BSJ from Ohio University, an MSW from Boston College, and a PhD in Education Policy from the University of Michigan.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2349

Janna Kook

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Janna Kook

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Janna

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Kook

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Janna Kook advances the field’s knowledge of effective early childhood education and early STEM learning and teaching, with a focus on the link between teacher professional development and child outcomes. An experienced researcher and program evaluator, she has expertise in advanced quantitative research methods.

Kook is currently responsible for research design, study coordination, measure development, data analysis, and dissemination work for three major studies.  In Games for Young Mathematicians, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Core Research study aimed at understanding how young children’s mathematics learning can be supported through their development of mastery motivation, Kook is helping to analyze data from a randomized-control trial of a newly developed, game-based intervention. Within this same line of research, she is also part of an exploratory research study funded by the Heising-Simons Foundation, to understand aspects of teacher-child interaction and teacher language that contribute to children’s development of math skills and mastery motivation.

Kook is also contributing to the first study to examine middle school science fairs at a national level. As part of the NSF-funded Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) study, Science Fairs Under the ‘Scope, she is helping to plan, implement, and analyze a large, nationally representative survey of middle school science fair leaders and a subsequent, more focused study of selected science fairs across the country and their effectiveness of supporting students’ science and engineering practices.

Kook played a key role in EDC’s Cultivating Young Scientists, a study funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) that developed a three-course suite of professional development tools to support preschool teachers in engaging children in hands-on scientific inquiry in life, earth, and engineering sciences. She led the evaluation of the study’s professional development based on teacher feedback, assessment of teacher learning and performance, and student outcomes. She also contributed to an NSF-funded DRK-12 study that examined teachers’ professional development choices related to revised Advanced Placement curricula for biology, chemistry, and physics.

Kook is coauthor of "Foundations of Science Literacy:  Efficacy of a Preschool Professional Development Program in Science on Classroom Instruction, Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge, and Children's Observations and Predictions", along with several other peer-reviewed publications related to early childhood education, early science learning, and executive functions. She is also a co-developer of Lens on Science, a computer-based assessment of preschool science.

Before joining EDC, Kook received a PhD in Applied Developmental Psychology at the University of Miami. She was an IES predoctoral fellow and was awarded a Head Start Graduate Student Research Grant for her dissertation on teacher-child interactions that promote higher-level thinking. She received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2797

Gary Resnick

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Gary Resnick

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Gary

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Resnick

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Gary Resnick, a nationally recognized expert in child development research, brings decades of experience at the nexus of child development and program evaluation. He has evaluated early childhood development programs, assessed young children’s school readiness outcomes (especially for children living in disadvantaged communities), examined Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) for state early childhood agencies, and measured inter-agency collaboration and coordination.

Resnick is currently Principal Investigator for the Local Evaluation component of Educare in California at Silicon Valley (ECSV), which aims to lay the foundation for long-term success in school and beyond by narrowing or eliminating the achievement gap at kindergarten entry. To accomplish this, the program provides high-quality year-round educational programs and developmental childcare to at-risk children from six weeks to five years of age. In his capacity, Resnick works closely with ECSV leadership, teaching staff, family engagement specialists, coaches, and parents to utilize data for continuous program improvement.

To this role, Resnick brings extensive experience leading groundbreaking state and national research, including serving as Director of Instrument Development for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Surveys Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), Associate Project Director for the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), Senior Technical Advisor for the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), and Project Director for the State of New Jersey's Evaluation of Early Childhood Programming in Abbott School Districts.

Previously at EDC, Resnick served as co-Principal Investigator of the federally-funded Child Care Collaboration and Quality Project.  Before joining EDC, he was the Director of Research at Harder+Company Community Research, where he led evaluations of funded services in First 5 counties in California. Previously, he served as Senior Study Director of Child and Family Studies at Westat and was an Assistant Professor of Family and Human Development at Auburn University.

Resnick has worked with numerous federal, state, and county agencies, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, the State of New Jersey, the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care, First 5 Los Angeles, and the Los Angeles County Office of Education.

He has published his findings in numerous chapters and articles, including “Emergent Literacy of Low-Income Children in Head Start: Relationships with Child and Family Characteristics, Program Factors and Classroom Quality” (in Handbook of Early Literacy Research: Vol. 2, 2006) and “Project Head Start: Quality and Links to Child Outcomes” (in Childhood Programs and Practices in the First Decade of Life: A Human Capital Integration, 2010). He has made numerous presentations at conferences nationally and internationally, and currently serves as Associate Editor and Special Content Editor for the Early Childhood Research Quarterly.

Resnick earned a BA in Psychology and an MSW in Program Evaluation from the University of Toronto, and a PhD in Applied Developmental Psychology from the Eliot-Pearson Institute of Child Study and Human Development at Tufts University.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

999 16th St. #9
San Francisco, CA  94107

Telephone: 

415-251-1781

Deborah Rosenfeld

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Deborah Rosenfeld

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Deborah

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Rosenfeld

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Deborah Rosenfeld is an early mathematics education researcher, instructional designer, and professional developer. She is committed to improving educational outcomes for all children, particularly those from underserved communities. She has taught young children, studied teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about early childhood mathematics, and worked with teachers to develop knowledge of mathematical development. Her current work uses technology and media to engage children in narratives and games that leverage their natural curiosity and strengths as learners to develop their mathematical understanding and promote their persistence in solving problems.   

Rosenfeld leads research efforts on the Ready to Learn project, which evaluates the learning potential of public media resources. Her most recent study looked at what mathematics children learned through interactions with the Peg+Cat suite of videos and activities, as well as how their ability to self-regulate, persist, and demonstrate flexibility in solving problems might change through watching Peg and her friends model such behaviors. She is contributing her research expertise to EDC's Heising-Simons Foundation-funded initiative Finding Our Way Around, including conducting literature reviews, informing development of digital resources, and leading a team in developing an assessment to test the resources. She is also advancing the goals of Monkeying Around, an initiative focused on supporting families in fostering preschoolers' computational thinking. 

Previously, she studied how districts and schools support teachers in the implementation of reform-based mathematics curricula and the impact of that support and implementation on student achievement. She also was involved in the development of an early mathematics assessment system for 3- to 5-year-olds, was a curriculum writer for the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded elementary curriculum Think Math, and has supported teachers in implementing conceptual-based learning approaches in their elementary math classrooms. 

Rosenfeld is a co-author of the 2016 article, "Preparing Preschool Teachers to Use and Benefit from Formative Assessment: The Birthday Party Assessment Professional Development System" published in ZDM Mathematics Education. She contributed to the research reports Preschool Teachers Can Use a PBS KIDS Transmedia Curriculum Supplement to Support Young Children in Mathematics Learning: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Peg+Cat Content Study. She authored a paper, “Increased Perceived Efficacy for Teaching Math” in the Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College. Her unpublished dissertation was titled, “Fostering Competence and Confidence in Early Childhood Mathematics Teachers.”

Before joining EDC, Rosenfeld was a teacher at the Rashi School and the Hong Kong International School. She taught 1stand 4th grades, as well as teaching algebra to 8th graders.

Rosenfeld received an AB in Psychology from Harvard College, an EdM in Human Development and Psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a PhD in Educational Psychology with a focus on Mathematics Education from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Fl
New York, New York 10014 

Telephone: 

212-807-4248

Leslie Goodyear

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Leslie Goodyear

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Leslie

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Goodyear

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Leslie Goodyear, a nationally recognized expert in educational evaluation and president-elect of the American Evaluation Association (AEA), has led studies at the local, regional, and national levels. She has conducted evaluations and evaluation capacity-building in formal and informal educational settings, afterschool programs, youth civic engagement, HIV prevention, youth development, and human services programs, with a recent focus on STEM educational programs in informal settings.

Goodyear coordinates evaluation initiatives and leverages evaluation capacity across the Learning and Teaching Division. Currently, she serves as the Principal Investigator for multi-year evaluations of NSF’s Broadening Participation in Computing–Alliances Program and Illinois 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program. Recently, she conducted a landscape study for the Committee on Communicating Chemistry in Informal Settings that informed a 2016 report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is continuing to support the Committee by evaluating how target audiences access and use the report.

Previously, Goodyear led extensive program evaluations of the Adobe Youth Voices initiative and the Teen Science Café Network. She also provided evaluation technical assistance and research agenda development for NSF’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Learning Resource Center and contributed a chapter to the ITEST publication Preparing Tomorrow’s STEM Workforce.

In addition to serving a three-year term as the president of AEA, Goodyear is the associate editor of AEA’s American Journal of Evaluation. She has held several other offices for AEA, including board member (2007-2009), member and chair of the AEA Ethics Committee (2004-2006), and Ethics section editor for American Journal of Evaluation.

Goodyear was one of 13 national out-of-school-time experts chosen to serve on the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Education’s Committee on Successful Out-of-School STEM Learning. In this capacity, she authored the chapter "Program Evaluation" in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Out-of-School Learning (2017) and contributed to the 2015 NRC report Identifying and Supporting Productive STEM Programs in Out-of-School Settings. She is the editor of Qualitative Inquiry in Evaluation: From Theory to Practice (2014), author of the chapter “Building a Community of Evaluation Practice Within a Multisite Program,” and editor of a special issue on ethics in evaluation in Evaluation and Program Planning.  

From 2009 to 2012, Goodyear was a Program Officer at the National Science Foundation, where she administered grants in the ITEST, Informal Science Education, Promoting Research and Innovation in Methodologies for Evaluation, and CAREER programs; supervised evaluation and research contracts; and developed directorate and division-level evaluation policy. Before joining EDC, she was National Director for Evaluation for City Year, Managing Editor for The Evaluation Exchange, an evaluation contractor, and a fundraiser and frontline staff member for education and human services organizations.

Goodyear received a BS from Macalester College and MS and PhD degrees from Cornell University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453

Telephone: 

617-618-2354

Ashley Lewis Presser

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Ashley Lewis Presser

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Ashley

Last name: 

Lewis Presser

Bio: 

Ashley Lewis Presser leads education research that has a special focus on investigating the effectiveness of preschool math and science interventions and develops assessments for children. She brings expertise in conducting quasi-experimental and randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies and has conducted RCTs on several projects, including Next Generation Preschool Math, Big Math for Little Kids, and Possible Worlds Digital Games. Her research interests include technology integration into classrooms, comprehension within various media formats, the evaluation of after-school and STEM programs, the impact of domestic violence on children's development, the moral development of gifted students, and the symbolic understanding of young children.

Lewis Presser is the Principal Investigator of Finding Our Way Around, a Heising-Simons Foundation-funded initiative to design resources for families that feature digital and hands-on activities to promote children’s understanding of spatial ideas and prepare them for success in mathematics. She also leads Next Generation Preschool Math, an R&D initiative to develop and evaluate supplemental preschool math modules that integrate digital games and non-digital classroom activities to promote young children’s learning of foundational mathematics concepts. These games are now available for free in Apple’s Appstore and the curriculum guides are available online for public use. As a member of the Next Generation Preschool Science team, she is contributing to an R&D initiative to develop and evaluate a program to promote young children’s learning of key science practices and concepts.

With a long track record of leading successful projects that focus on student learning outcomes, Lewis Presser is currently leading a formative and summative evaluation of Side x Side Project Imagine, a K-5 comprehensive arts integration pilot program in a public elementary school, As the project director for the Big Math for Little Kids evaluation, she contributed to a longitudinal RCT that investigated the impact of the curriculum on young children’s mathematics knowledge after experiencing it during both the preschool and kindergarten years. In research that built on EDC’s work as a National R&D Center on Instructional Technology, Lewis Presser worked with a team that investigated how representational choices made in the design of digital games for learning influenced student engagement with core science concepts. And, she and colleagues studied how educators used and implemented PBS LearningMedia resources and assessed how the resources impacted classroom practices, quality of instruction, and student learning. She also led a formative and summative evaluation of GreenFab,  a project-based, hands-on approach to teaching STEM concepts to high-school students that features a focus on career development in the emergent field of sustainable technologies.

Lewis Presser is the lead author of peer reviewed articles, such as “Big Math for Little Kids: The Effectiveness of a Preschool and Kindergarten Mathematics Curriculum” (Early Education and Development).  In addition, she has co-authored chapters published in Handbook of Response to Intervention (RTI) in Early Childhood and 21st Century Education: A Reference Handbook. She presents her research at national conferences such as the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, the Interaction Design & Children Conference, and the National Head Start Research Conference.

Before joining EDC, Lewis Presser worked as a research assistant at the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement. In addition to her research experience, she has extensive experience teaching both graduate and undergraduate students.  

Lewis Presser earned a BS in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and an MA and PhD in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4264

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