Research and Evaluation

Babette Moeller

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Babette

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Moeller

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Babette Moeller focuses on the development of and research on educational programs across the curriculum that help ensure elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students with disabilities are included in and benefit from educational reform efforts. As project director of numerous EDC R&D initiatives, she contributes her extensive experience designing and implementing technology-supported programs in general and special education, providing professional development for teachers and administrators in a variety of settings, and conducting formative and summative evaluation research.

Moeller is the Principal Investigator of an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study that is testing the impact of Math for All—a professional development program developed by EDC and Bank Street College of Education and published by Corwin Press—on teachers and students from Chicago Public Schools. Shown to have promise to positively affect teachers and students, Math for All prepares K–5 teachers to help students with diverse strengths and needs—including those with disabilities—achieve high-quality, standards-based learning outcomes in mathematics.

Recently, Moeller led a study of the impact of PBS LearningMedia on teachers' classroom practices, the quality of instruction, and student learning. Her team's findings indicate that PBS LearningMedia's digital content positively impacts student content knowledge and critical thinking practices when integrated into existing curriculum; teachers who participated in the study overwhelmingly reported that PBS LearningMedia made positive contributions to their classroom practices.

An active member of professional teacher organizations, Moeller represents EDC’s Center for Children and Technology within 100Kin10, a national network of organizations devoted to adding 100,000 more highly qualified STEM teachers to America’s classrooms by 2021. Moeller is also the Past President of Science Education for Students with Disabilities (SESD), a professional group affiliated with the National Science Teacher Association (NSTA). She is a proposal reviewer for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education and contributes to expert panels and serves on national advisory boards. She is an adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and has taught courses in technology integration, media research, and child development at Fordham University's Graduate School of Education and the New School for Social Research.

In 2016, Moeller presented sessions at the 13th International Conference on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) in Hamburg, Germany, and she regularly presents at the annual conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Council, the Council for Exceptional Children, and Learning Forward. Her recent publications include: "The Benefits of Undergraduate Research Fellowships for Students with Disabilities” (CUR Quarterly); "Building Relationships, Sharing Resources, and Building Opportunities: A STEM Learning Community Builds Social Capital for Students with Disabilities" (Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability); Integrating Technology with Student-Centered Learning; "Universal Design for Learning: Facilitating Access and Participation for All Students"; and "Making Standards-Based Mathematics Accessible to Students with Disabilities."

Moeller holds a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the New School for Social Research.

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Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4205

Bill Tally

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Bill Tally

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Bill

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Tally

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Bill Tally leads education R&D initiatives that advance the field's knowledge of how the strategic use of digital tools can make learning more rigorous, meaningful, and engaging. He brings deep expertise in interdisciplinary learning, the digital humanities, formative research, historical studies, and the sociology of education—as well as experience configuring digital archives to enable students, teachers, and the public to do authentic historical inquiry.

Tally is the principal investigator of Zoom In! Teaching Science with Data, an initiative to build high school students’ skills in using data to investigate significant problems in biology and earth science. This initiative draws upon EDC’s Zoom In, an online instructional platform named a 2016 Best Website for Teaching and Learning that Tally led the design and development of with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Tally is also leading an EDC team that is serving as the primary research collaborator for the Library of Congress's Teaching with Primary Sources program. On an ongoing basis, he conducts evaluations that help program developers assess and refine a wide array of initiatives focused on social studies, digital media resources, digital games and storytelling, the needs of diverse learners, and teacher professional development (view a full project list).

Recently, Tally headed up an effort to support the New York Philharmonic in expanding the reach of their Young People's Concerts, by developing an interactive website, Young People's Concerts Play! As co-Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation-funded eTG project, he collaborated on the design and testing of a prototype electronic teacher’s guide that helps teachers with varying knowledge and skills plan and teach a genetics curriculum, reflect on its execution, and enhance instruction.

Tally’s clients and partners have included the Library of Congress, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The New York Times, National Geographic, WNET, City University of New York, the Smithsonian Institution, MIT, Carnegie Hall, the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Chicago History Museum, and Bank Street College of Education.  

He presents his research at the conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Association (“The Technology Literacy Inventory: Assessing Teacher Candidates’ Readiness to Teach All Students”) and the International Society for Technology in Education (“Using Historical RPGs to Teach History Content and Critical Thinking Skills”).

Tally co-authored the book The New Media Literacy Handbook: An Educator’s Guide to Bringing New Media into the Classroom. He has also published on the use of digitized primary sources to foster historical thinking (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); the role of digital tools in enlivening social studies learning and teaching (Theory and Research in Social Education); and how history games can help engage students in historical thinking (National Historic Education Clearinghouse).

He received a BA in psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz and an MA in liberal studies from the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research (with an emphasis on American cultural history). He holds a PhD in sociology from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where his dissertation examined children’s and parents’ use of the Web in low- and middle-income homes.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4206

Naomi Hupert

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Naomi

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Hupert

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Naomi Hupert leads initiatives that seek to close opportunity gaps for students who struggle to meet grade-level academic benchmarks and to identify supports required to provide all students with engaging and challenging academic instruction. Her research and development (R&D) and program evaluation work has a special focus on the use of technology to support teachers and students (read Hupert’s blog post on universal design for learning).

Hupert is a co-Principal Investigator of EDC's long-term investigation of the influence of the Ready To Learn initiative on the early learning and school readiness of young children in high-need communities. In this capacity, she has co-led a series of studies, including a randomized controlled trial study that measured the benefits to children from low-income families of a media-rich early math curriculum supplement. In an earlier phase of this work, she was the project director of Ready To Learn research that focused on literacy and is included in the What Works Clearinghouse. In 2016, she contributed to three widely-distributed publications that shared findings from her Ready To Learn research: the report Reflections on the Ready to Learn Initiative 2010 to 2015; an article in Journal of Children and Media (Dramatic Change, Persistent Challenges: A Five-Year View of Children's Educational Media as Resources for Equity); and the EDC white paper Early STEM Learning and the Roles of Technologies.

Over the years, Hupert has led a wide variety of formative and summative evaluations that have guided program designers in improving delivery and content to enhance children’s and youth’s learning. She has examined the impact of Sesame Workshop’s programming on children and teachers in early learning settings, and has worked to evaluate Lawrence Hall of Science's development of multimedia educative curriculum materials (MECMs) to support middle school science teachers in teaching scientific argumentation. Recently, she concluded a small classroom implementation study of StarWalk Writer, a cloud-based platform that creates a collaborative environment for upper elementary and middle school reading, writing, and research. For seven years, she led formative and summative evaluations of New Mexico’s K–3 Reading First program implementation.

Previously, Hupert served as the literacy content developer for the PowerUp What Works professional development resource developed by EDC, AIR and CAST. Her findings appear in periodicals such as Early Childhood Research Quarterly (“Supplementing Literacy Instruction with a Media-Rich Intervention: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial”), Journal of Computing in Teacher Education, and Journal of Research on Technology in Education. She is the lead author of the chapters “Using Technology-Assisted Progress Monitoring to Drive Improved Student Outcomes” and “Results in the Palms of Their Hands: Using Handheld Computers for Data-Driven Decision Making in the Classroom, and has co-authored numerous reports (Five States’ Efforts to Improve Adolescent Literacy).

Hupert regularly presents her findings at the annual conferences of such organizations as Games+Learning+Society (GLS), National Association for the Education of Young Children, National Head Start Association, International Society for Technology in Education, American Educational Research Association, Association for Mathematics Teacher Educators, Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, and Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. She has served as a proposal reviewer for the American Educational Research Association and the National Reading Conference.

Hupert holds a BA in American and British Literature from Scripps College and an MS in Education, with a specialization in literacy and language-related learning disabilities, from Bank Street College of Education.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

707-829-8532

Marian Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale

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Marian

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Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale has deep expertise in middle grade and high school science professional development, technical assistance, and curriculum development. She leads and co-leads numerous innovative science education initiatives and designs and leads professional development that focuses on integrating inquiry into standards-aligned science instruction.

Pasquale is the co-Principal Investigator of EDC's Science Fairs Under the 'Scope study, an in-depth investigation of science fairs in the U.S. that will provide new insights into if and how science fairs increase students’ interest in STEM and/or STEM careers, if and and how participation in select models of middle school science fairs enhance students’ mastery of the science and engineering practices, and the costs and resources required to implement an effective middle school science fair. She is also the science specialist for the Amgen Biotech Experience Program Office at EDC.

In her work for the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory that EDC co-leads, Pasquale authored and co-authored several publications focused on effective strategies to enhance STEM instruction and improve STEM learning outcomes for young children. These include: "Productive Struggle in Mathematics," "How Teachers Can Develop Formative Assessments That Fit A Three-Dimensional View of Science Learning," and "Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics."

Pasquale served as the Senior Science Curriculum Developer for EDC's National Research and Development Center on Educational Technology. In this capacity, she collaborated with colleagues to develop four digital games—and related professional development materials for teachers—that are designed to help improve students' understanding of phenomena that are often the subject of scientific misconceptions. Previously, she served as a professional development specialist for EDC's Foundation Science high school curriculum and was a senior curriculum writer for EDC’s Insights in Biology high school curriculum.

For several years, Pasquale has developed and led courses—including "Teaching Science Through the Inquiry Process" and "Project-Based Classroom Science"—for the Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair. In summer 2014, she designed and taught an Earth Science Professional Development Institute funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education.

Pasquale regularly presents on the topics of middle school science, assessment, science and literacy, and the use of games to enhance science learning. Recently, she has provided sessions at the National Science Teachers Association Annual Conference, the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association ("Using Students' Naive Theories to Design Games for Middle Grades Science"), the National Association for Research on Science Teaching Annual Conference, the WNET Celebration of Learning, and the Games, Learning, and Society Conference.

She is the co-author of the books Making Science Mentors: A 10-Session Guide for Middle Grades and Guiding Curriculum Decisions for Middle-Grades Science, as well as the articles "Providing School and District-Level Support for Science Education Reform" (Science Educator) and "Models of Providing Science Instruction in the Elementary Grades: A Research Agenda to Inform Policy Makers" (Science Educator).

Pasquale has consulted with public television in the development of the Learning Science Through Inquiry series funded by Annenberg/CPB. She has designed and conducted professional development and technical assistance for middle and high school administrators and teacher leaders throughout the nation, including the Portland (OR), New York City, Cambridge (MA), and Fort Wayne (TX) public schools. 

Before joining EDC, Pasquale was the K–6 Science Coordinator for the Haverhill. Massachusetts, Public Schools, where she was a seventh and eighth grade science teacher for over 20 years.

Pasquale received a BA from Emmanuel College and an MEd in Curriculum, Instruction, and Administration in Science Education from Boston College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2417

Johannah Nikula

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Johannah Nikula

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Johannah

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Nikula

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Johannah Nikula helps teachers make engaging and intellectually stimulating mathematical learning experiences available and accessible to all learners. She specializes in designing and studying models of professional development for mathematics teachers, with a particular focus on working with students from diverse backgrounds and those who possess varying degrees of proficiency in English.

Nikula is co–Principal Investigator of Visual Access to Mathematics: Professional Development for Teachers of English Learners, a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop and study a blended face-to-face and online course focused on visual representations and supports for language access. She is also a key contributor to the NSF-funded Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards initiative, which is developing online resources and professional development materials that support teachers’ understanding and use of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Standards for Mathematical Practice (SMP).

Previously, Nikula was co-Principal Investigator on two projects focused on students who are English Learners (ELs). For the NSF-funded Mathematical Record Keeping Supports Cognition and Communication study, she examined features of mathematics tasks that promote student record-keeping and investigated how those task features support cognition and communication for students, in particular for English learners (ELs). For the Mathematics Coaching Supporting English Language Learners project, funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), she oversaw a team that developed and studied professional development materials for middle-grades mathematics teachers focused on enhancing the mathematical learning and academic language development of students who are ELs. Nikula has also served as an instructional coach for mathematics teachers of ELs. (To learn more about Nikula’s work with mathematics teachers of ELs, read the recently published book, Mathematical Thinking and Communication: Access for English Learners.) In addition, she was one of the lead developers of middle grades statistics education resources for the Measuring and Addressing Middle-Grades Misconceptions in Statistics project funded by the NSF.

Nikula’s articles appear in journals such as Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School ("Supporting English Learners—Lessons from Research") and Mathematics Teacher Educator ("Developing Teachers’ Knowledge of a Transformations-based Approach to Geometric Similarity"). She has co-authored numerous professional books and chapters about mathematics teacher professional development and mathematics teaching and learning. Examples include Mathematical Thinking and Communication: Access for English Learners; A Mathematics Leader’s Guide to Lesson Study in Practice; Fostering Geometric Thinking: A Guide for Teachers Grades 5–10; the chapter "Secondary School Students’ Proportional Reasoning" in Teaching and Learning Mathematics: Translating Research for Secondary School Teachers; and The Fostering Algebraic Thinking Toolkit: A Guide for Staff Development.

Nikula received a BA in psychology with a minor in mathematics from Middlebury College and an EdM from Harvard University Graduate School of Education with a focus on Technology in Education.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Director II

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2542

Pam Buffington

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Pam Buffington

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Pam

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Buffington

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Pam Buffington provides technical support in evidence based policy development and decisionmaking to state and local education agencies and is a project leader in the development and management of multiple professional development initiatives. She is an expert in technology integration in education with extensive work in the areas of mathematics and science, and has designed and implemented online and face-to-face professional development materials. As Co-Director of the Science and Mathematics Programs Unit, she leads a team of researchers, instructional designers, and professional developers in investigating and implementing strategies to improve students' learning outcomes.

Buffington is EDC's co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of the National Science Foundation-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory, an initiative focused on equity-oriented STEM education improvement. In this work, she leads a partnership with the Auburn, Maine School Department to improve student learning of mathematics in the early grades through the integration of interactive mobile technologies such as iPads. She has presented this work extensively at convenings such as the 13th annual International Congress on Mathematical Education and the conferences of organizations such as the National Rural Educators Association, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics.

As the co-PI of EDC's Visual Access to Mathematics study, Buffington is working with Mark Driscoll and Johannah Nikula to develop and study a blended-learning professional development program that will address the critical need to support middle-grades mathematics teachers in enhancing English learners' mathematics learning and promoting their college and career readiness. She also serves as a State Liaison and Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance Facilitator for the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded REL Northeast & Islands and a STEM technical assistance provider for Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) program grantees.

Buffington was the PI of the IES-funded Eliciting Mathematics Misconceptions: A Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment System, an initiative that developed and validated diagnostic formative assessments in the content area of rational numbers. She was also the Project Director for several initiatives, including the Maine Impact Study of Technology in Mathematics Intervention; the Enhancing and Extending the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives Project; SELECT Math Professional Development Intervention, Boston; and District Level Consultation–Standards-Based Mathematics Instruction. She also served as lead mathematics specialist in support of Maine’s Learning Technology Initiative.

In 2016, Buffington was selected to be the Richard H. Balomenos Lecturer by the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in New England (ATMNE) and presented the keynote “Strategic Use of Mobile Technologies as an Equity Move” at the ATMNE Conference. She also published her work extensively in 2016. She is a co-author of the chapter “Partnership-Based Research Approaches” in Rural Education Research: State of the Science and Emerging Directions, and co-authored the article “Enhancing Use of Learning Sciences Research in Planning for and Supporting Educational Change: Leveraging and Building Social Networks” (Journal of Educational Change). Through her work on the R+P Collaboratory, she has co-authored a series of briefs and reports on the role that interactive technology can play in enhancing mathematics learning, including Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics, Supporting Equity Through Co-Investigation: Sharing Student Videos, and Research+Practice Partnerships: Fostering Equitable Collaborations.

Before joining EDC, Buffington was the Director of Technology and Assessment Development for Learning Effects in Falmouth, Maine; a Project Director at TERC in Cambridge; and an adjunct faculty member at the Graduate School of Education, Instructional Technology Program, at Bridgewater State College. She has worked as a mathematics teacher and technology coordinator.

Buffington received a BS in secondary education and mathematics with a minor in Physics from University of Maine at Farmington, an MA in curriculum and instruction from Lesley College, and a PhD in education (integrating multicultural education, technology, and educational practice) from the Union Institute.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Co-Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

36 Brunswick Avenue
Gardiner, Maine 04345

Telephone: 

207-588-5022

Louisa Anastasopoulos

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Louisa Anastasopoulos

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Louisa

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Anastasopoulos

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Louisa Anastasopoulos has expertise in research and evaluation project management across grade levels and content areas, including the development of data quality control systems, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods analysis, and formative feedback. She has extensive knowledge of early language and literacy development and early childhood programs.

Currently, Anastasopoulos is part of a team evaluating the Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s District Level Systems Change Initiative, which is focused on student-centered learning in a number of high schools throughout New England. In addition to qualitative and quantitative analysis, she also contributes to the development of observation and interview protocols and data management systems, and conducts site visits, focus groups and interviews.

Recently, Anastasopoulos examined how the use of a curriculum is related to changes in instructional practice. In addition to collaborating on the development and refinement of observation and survey instruments, the project employed mixed-methods analyses to capture and explain variation in instruction in classrooms.  She was also part of two teams that conducted formative and summative evaluations of Early Reading First programs in Worcester and Springfield, Massachusetts. In addition, she was a senior analyst for an early childhood research project using secondary data provided by the state of Ohio.

As Associate Project Director for a research project for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education, she compared the effects of a literacy intervention using traditional and distance learning methods. She was the Research Coordinator for the New England Quality Research Center for Head Start (NEQRC), one of four national centers designed to examine the impact of classroom quality on child outcomes.

Anastasopoulos is coauthor of the Early Language and Literacy Classroom Observation (ELLCO) Pre-K Tool and User’s Guide, published by Brookes Publishing Co., which are used by early childhood programs and researchers to look at the classroom environment and levels of support for children’s language and emerging literacy development. She co-developed and is lead instructor for the ELLCO Pre-K Training of Trainers Institute.

She received her BA from Colby College and master's degree in public policy with a focus on education from the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. She is proficient in Spanish and fluent in Greek.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2117

Rebecca Carey

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Rebecca Carey

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Rebecca

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Carey

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Rebecca Carey provides leadership and management on large- and small-scale contracts and grants for research and evaluation projects at EDC. She brings experience in educational research, with a focus on collaborative research, and program evaluation, including randomized controlled trials of models of online professional development.

Carey is a Project Director for the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. She oversees a large portfolio of education research studies and technical assistance activities in response to the needs of state and local education agencies across the region. She manages partner relationships and research staff to create relevant, responsive, and rigorous responses to education research questions as well as events bringing researchers and practitioners together to discuss bridging research findings into policy and practice.  She is also the EDC-based Project Director for i3 Implementation Technical Assistance which provides assistance to i3 grantees across the nation in both one on one TA and in communities.

She works with Westat, American Institute of Research, WestEd, Education Consultant Associates, Chesapeake Research Associates and Nimble Assessments, and she has worked closely with the Louisiana Department of Education to provide ongoing evaluation support to its Virtual Academy.

Carey recently coauthored "Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices: Strategies from Investing in Innovation." She is coauthor of “Developing a Coherent Research Agenda: Lessons from the REL Northeast & Islands Research Agenda Workshops, as well as several publications on virtual education, including “Online Courses for Math Teachers: Comparing Self-Paced and Facilitated Cohort Approaches”; “A Study of the Effectiveness of the Louisiana Algebra I Online Course”; “Comparing Self-paced and Cohort-based Online Courses for Teachers"; “Face-to-Face and Online Professional Development for Mathematics Teachers: A Comparative Study.” She also produced The Reinventing Education Change Toolkit, an online resource for schools and districts undertaking systemic change. She was a peer reviewer for The Journal of Technology, Learning and Assessment.

Before joining EDC, Carey was an organization change consultant for IBM, working with corporate and education clients and overseeing the creation of The Change Toolkit. She was also a high school history teacher.

Carey received a BA from Vassar College and an EdM from Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2892

Abigail Levy

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Abigail Levy

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Abigail

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Levy

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Abigail Jurist Levy brings extensive experience in the fields of public K­–12 education and adult workforce development. As Co-Director of the Science and Mathematics Programs Unit, she leads a team of researchers, instructional designers, and professional developers in investigating and implementing strategies to improve students' learning outcomes.

Levy is the Principal Investigator (PI) of Science Fairs Under the 'Scope, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded study of the impact and cost-effectiveness of science fairs in the U.S. Previously, she was the PI of the three-year NSF–funded study, Elementary Science Specialists and Classroom Generalists: Are There Differences in Science Instruction, Student Achievement, and Cost?, which compared the quantity, quality, and cost of science instruction provided by elementary science specialists to that of classroom generalists.

For eight years, Levy led research associated with the Boston Science Partnership, a study that drew upon district employment data, professional development participation data, and classroom observation and interview data to identify impacts on teacher and student outcomes. She also served as the PI on several studies of teacher turnover, including an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study for REL Northeast & Islands at EDC that produced the report Developing the "Compendium of Strategies to Reduce Teacher Turnover in the Northeast and Islands Region.

Levy is the co-author of the report, Researching the Sustainability of Reform: Factors that Contribute to or Inhibit Program Endurance. She publishes her findings in journals such as Phi Delta Kappan ("The Science of Professional Development") and Science Educator ("No Teacher Left Unqualified: How Teachers and Principals Respond to the Highly Qualified Mandate" and "Models of Providing Science Instruction in the Elementary Grades: A Research Agenda to Inform Decision Makers"). In 2010, she co-authored an article in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching ("Inquiry-based Science Instruction--What Is It and Does it Matter?") that received the National Association for Research in Science Teaching's 2011 Outstanding Paper Award. More recently, she coauthored an Education Week Commentary in which she advocated for a phased-in approach to implementing the Next Generation Science Standards.

Before joining EDC, Levy was the Manager of Research and Evaluation for the Corporation for Business, Work, and Learning, where she developed research, planning, and evaluation strategies at the state level for federally funded job training programs. As a private consultant, she has worked with urban and suburban school systems on improving school-community partnerships, involving parents of hard-to-serve youth, and conducting system-wide needs assessments. She has also taught in public school classrooms and worked with state and national workforce development organizations as a policy analyst.

Levy has a BFA in Art Education from Tufts University and the Museum of Fine Arts and an MMHS and PhD in Family and Children Policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Co-Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2437

Julie Riordan

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Julie Riordan

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Julie

Last name: 

Riordan

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Julie Riordan advances knowledge of strategies to sustain strong researcher-practitioner partnerships that give practitioners the evidence they need to improve student outcomes. In addition to her specialization in collaborative research, she leads studies that focus on teacher preparation and evaluation systems, mathematics education, comprehensive school reform, and implementation science in education. She brings extensive experience in survey research, multivariate analyses, and utilization of national data sets, as well as qualitative methodologies. She also provides analytic support that builds capacity to utilize data to guide decision-making and works to promote knowledge utilization through local, regional, and national forums and online dissemination.

Riordan is the Director of Research for the IES-funded REL Northeast & Islands at EDC. As part of this work, she is an associate member of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Forum on Education Statistics and has presented at meetings of the Forum’s Policies, Programs, and Implementation Committee and National Education Statistics Agenda Committee.

Recently, she led a REL Northeast & Islands study that examined new district teacher evaluation systems in New Hampshire districts that received School Improvement Grants and co-authored an IES report that presents the study’s findings. She co-authored an earlier IES report, An Examination of Performance-Based Teacher Evaluation Systems in Five States, as well as the white paper, Changing Cultures and Building Capacity: An Exploration of District Strategies for Implementation of Teacher Evaluation Systems.

Riordan is the PI of an IES-funded grant in which EDC and the Providence Public School District (PPSD) are establishing a researcher-practitioner partnership to improve achievement among students who are members of underrepresented groups. From her work with PPSD, the REL Northeast & Islands research alliances, and a collaboration with researchers in Pakistan to design a survey instrument to capture attitudes toward and use of research in Pakistan, Riordan has gained deep insight into effective education researcher-practitioner partnerships. In 2015, she shared some of her findings during a public television broadcast on research-practice partnerships and a REL Northeast & Islands Collaborative Research Forum Webinar.

She is an advisor to and reviewer for several national initiatives. She serves on IES review panels, and she is a member of the U.S. Department of Education’s Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy (SRCL) Evaluation TA Technical Work Group. As part of this work, she was invited to give a presentation on working collaboratively with practitioners to build state and district capacity to use data and research for decision-making.  She also regularly presents at national conferences, including the American Educational Research Association, the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, and the Association of Education Policy and Finance.

Riordan was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Policy and Administration at American University, teaching courses on the policy process and statistics and performed program evaluation and policy analysis at the Consortium for Policy Research in Education prior to joining EDC. She has served as an editorial board member for Perspectives on Urban Education and a reviewer for the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (JRME). A JRME article that she co-authored is included in the What Works Clearinghouse.

She received a BA in international studies from American University, an MA in higher education from Boston College, and a PhD in education policy from the University of Pennsylvania.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2827

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