Science

Ashley Lewis Presser

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Ashley Lewis Presser

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Ashley

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Lewis Presser

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Ashley Lewis Presser leads education research that has a special focus on investigating the effectiveness of preschool math and science interventions and develops assessments for children. She brings expertise in conducting quasi-experimental and randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies and has conducted RCTs on several projects, including Next Generation Preschool Math, Big Math for Little Kids, and Possible Worlds Digital Games. Her research interests include technology integration into classrooms, comprehension within various media formats, the evaluation of after-school and STEM programs, the impact of domestic violence on children's development, the moral development of gifted students, and the symbolic understanding of young children.

Lewis Presser is the Principal Investigator of Finding Our Way Around, a Heising-Simons Foundation-funded initiative to design resources for families that feature digital and hands-on activities to promote children’s understanding of spatial ideas and prepare them for success in mathematics. She also leads Next Generation Preschool Math, an R&D initiative to develop and evaluate supplemental preschool math modules that integrate digital games and non-digital classroom activities to promote young children’s learning of foundational mathematics concepts. These games are now available for free in Apple’s Appstore and the curriculum guides are available online for public use. As a member of the Next Generation Preschool Science team, she is contributing to an R&D initiative to develop and evaluate a program to promote young children’s learning of key science practices and concepts.

With a long track record of leading successful projects that focus on student learning outcomes, Lewis Presser is currently leading a formative and summative evaluation of Side x Side Project Imagine, a K-5 comprehensive arts integration pilot program in a public elementary school, As the project director for the Big Math for Little Kids evaluation, she contributed to a longitudinal RCT that investigated the impact of the curriculum on young children’s mathematics knowledge after experiencing it during both the preschool and kindergarten years. In research that built on EDC’s work as a National R&D Center on Instructional Technology, Lewis Presser worked with a team that investigated how representational choices made in the design of digital games for learning influenced student engagement with core science concepts. And, she and colleagues studied how educators used and implemented PBS LearningMedia resources and assessed how the resources impacted classroom practices, quality of instruction, and student learning. She also led a formative and summative evaluation of GreenFab,  a project-based, hands-on approach to teaching STEM concepts to high-school students that features a focus on career development in the emergent field of sustainable technologies.

Lewis Presser is the lead author of peer reviewed articles, such as “Big Math for Little Kids: The Effectiveness of a Preschool and Kindergarten Mathematics Curriculum” (Early Education and Development).  In addition, she has co-authored chapters published in Handbook of Response to Intervention (RTI) in Early Childhood and 21st Century Education: A Reference Handbook. She presents her research at national conferences such as the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, the Interaction Design & Children Conference, and the National Head Start Research Conference.

Before joining EDC, Lewis Presser worked as a research assistant at the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement. In addition to her research experience, she has extensive experience teaching both graduate and undergraduate students.  

Lewis Presser earned a BS in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and an MA and PhD in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota.

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Job title: 

Research Scientist

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Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4264

Jeff Winokur

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Jeff Winokur

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Jeff

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Winokur

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Jeff Winokur is a nationally recognized expert in designing and delivering science professional development, and has taught pre-service and in-service courses in the teaching of science to children. He has consulted to early childhood programs and elementary schools throughout New England, providing professional development for teachers on appropriate science teaching and programming for children from Pre-K through Grade 5.

Currently, Winokur works on EDC's Literacy and Academic Success for English Learners through Science (LASErS) program, designing and facilitating professional development that integrates science and literacy for PreK, Kindergarten and Grade 1 teachers in Hartford, Connecticut. In addition, he is the elementary science advisor to EDC’s Computer Science STEM Integration and Collaboration Project (CS-STEM-IC).

Winokur is also an Early Childhood and Elementary Science Educator at Wheelock College, where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate level courses in the teaching of science to children ages 3–12. (Read a blog post by Winokur about the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and elementary science education.)

Recently, Winokur worked on EDC's Cultivating Young Scientists initiative, a three-year, Institute of Education Sciences (IES)–funded project that developed two science professional development programs for early childhood teachers in Connecticut. He also worked on the Connecting Science and Literacy Program, which led to the publications The Essentials of Science and Literacy and Science and Literacy: A Natural Fit.

Previously at EDC, Winokur was a member of the Center for Urban Science Education Reform (CUSER). He was a technical assistance team member for Fall River and Springfield, Massachusetts, and a staff trainer for the Worcester North Quadrant Initiative. Additionally, he was a member of the elementary team for the EDC K–12 Science Curriculum Dissemination Center, as well as one of the developers of The Young Scientist Series, an EDC project that developed early childhood science curriculum and training materials.

Winokur received a BS from the University of Pennsylvania and an MEd from Antioch University.

 

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Senior Training and Technical Assistance Associate

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2516

Marian Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale

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Marian

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Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale has deep expertise in middle grade and high school science professional development, technical assistance, and curriculum development. She leads and co-leads numerous innovative science education initiatives and designs and leads professional development that focuses on integrating inquiry into standards-aligned science instruction.

Pasquale is the co-Principal Investigator of EDC's Science Fairs Under the 'Scope study, an in-depth investigation of science fairs in the U.S. that will provide new insights into if and how science fairs increase students’ interest in STEM and/or STEM careers, if and and how participation in select models of middle school science fairs enhance students’ mastery of the science and engineering practices, and the costs and resources required to implement an effective middle school science fair. She is also the science specialist for the Amgen Biotech Experience Program Office at EDC.

In her work for the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory that EDC co-leads, Pasquale authored and co-authored several publications focused on effective strategies to enhance STEM instruction and improve STEM learning outcomes for young children. These include: "Productive Struggle in Mathematics," "How Teachers Can Develop Formative Assessments That Fit A Three-Dimensional View of Science Learning," and "Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics."

Pasquale served as the Senior Science Curriculum Developer for EDC's National Research and Development Center on Educational Technology. In this capacity, she collaborated with colleagues to develop four digital games—and related professional development materials for teachers—that are designed to help improve students' understanding of phenomena that are often the subject of scientific misconceptions. Previously, she served as a professional development specialist for EDC's Foundation Science high school curriculum and was a senior curriculum writer for EDC’s Insights in Biology high school curriculum.

For several years, Pasquale has developed and led courses—including "Teaching Science Through the Inquiry Process" and "Project-Based Classroom Science"—for the Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair. In summer 2014, she designed and taught an Earth Science Professional Development Institute funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education.

Pasquale regularly presents on the topics of middle school science, assessment, science and literacy, and the use of games to enhance science learning. Recently, she has provided sessions at the National Science Teachers Association Annual Conference, the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association ("Using Students' Naive Theories to Design Games for Middle Grades Science"), the National Association for Research on Science Teaching Annual Conference, the WNET Celebration of Learning, and the Games, Learning, and Society Conference.

She is the co-author of the books Making Science Mentors: A 10-Session Guide for Middle Grades and Guiding Curriculum Decisions for Middle-Grades Science, as well as the articles "Providing School and District-Level Support for Science Education Reform" (Science Educator) and "Models of Providing Science Instruction in the Elementary Grades: A Research Agenda to Inform Policy Makers" (Science Educator).

Pasquale has consulted with public television in the development of the Learning Science Through Inquiry series funded by Annenberg/CPB. She has designed and conducted professional development and technical assistance for middle and high school administrators and teacher leaders throughout the nation, including the Portland (OR), New York City, Cambridge (MA), and Fort Wayne (TX) public schools. 

Before joining EDC, Pasquale was the K–6 Science Coordinator for the Haverhill. Massachusetts, Public Schools, where she was a seventh and eighth grade science teacher for over 20 years.

Pasquale received a BA from Emmanuel College and an MEd in Curriculum, Instruction, and Administration in Science Education from Boston College.

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Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2417

Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis

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Rebecca

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Lewis

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Rebecca Lewis works to promote the integration of rigorous academic content with opportunities for students to develop essential skills necessary for success in postsecondary education and the workplace. She seeks to excite students about learning in formal and informal education settings, while giving them the tools to succeed in their educational pursuits and beyond.

Lewis is the Director of EDC's Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE) Program Office, in which capacity she leads the provision of technical assistance to support the innovative ABE Program's sites and participating teachers. Previously, she co-led the Ford Motor Company-funded Ford PAS project which developed—and provides technical assistance and professional development for—a program that has evolved from an academically rigorous high school curriculum integrating academic and career education into a comprehensive community-wide high school reform strategy (Ford Next Generation Learning).

She brings extensive expertise in developing a wide range of STEM curriculum and professional development materials, including modules for Ford PAS and curriculum development work for the middle school Zero Robotics programming competition (a NASA Summer of Innovation program). On a regular basis, she contributes her science content knowledge, teaching experience, and skills in research and materials development to advising projects on their efforts to design instructional resources and support for teachers.

Lewis has worked with schools, districts, corporate funders, and community-based partners on EDC programs. She created a hands-on guide for teachers on how to integrate gender equity into existing science curricula, and she assisted with the development of classroom scenarios and working papers on science and mathematics education. She is the author of "Engaging the Controversy in Science Education: Scientific Knowledge and Democratic Decisions."

She received a BS from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, an MAT in biology from Northeastern University, and a CAES from Boston College.

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Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2935

Nevin Katz

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Nevin Katz

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Nevin

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Katz

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Nevin Katz, a former science teacher, brings experience in online interactive development, mathematics and science instructional design, and design and facilitation of blended learning courses for K–12 teachers.

Katz advances the goals of a wide variety of initiatives across the Learning and Teaching Division and throughout EDC. Drawing on his technical expertise—iOS app development, front-end web development, Drupal theming, and the use of art and animation to convey key concepts—he helps teams create interactive learning experiences that engage and inform target audiences. Recently, Katz contributed to the development of a website, "Exploring Infectious Diseases," for high school and college biology students, their instructors, and adult learners. 

Katz also served as a member of a team that designed and tested a prototype Electronic Teacher Guide (eTG) designed to support teachers in implementing curriculum.The eTG features Biology Learning Experiences, tools to support teachers in reflecting on their practice, and related resources on topics such as holding productive discussions in the science classroom and using formative assessment. In this initiative, he helped develop eTG animations and videos that support teachers’ “mindful modification” of core curriculum.

Katz's recent projects include developing interactive self-assessment activities used in an online art history course for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art that was awarded a 2015 Gold MUSE award by the American Alliance of Museums; the Health Moments: Preventing Illness iOS app for Head Start home visitors; HP Learning Initiative for Entrepreneurs (HP Life) e-learning; and Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide. For seven years, he has designed science interactives (“Exploring the Seasons”) and courses (“Using Technology to Explore Weather and Climate”) for EDC’s EdTech Leaders Online program and facilitated ETLO courses.

Katz is a co-author of the EDC publication In Support of Educators: Strategies That Work and the author/illustrator of the Dr. Birdley Teaches Science series of teacher resource books, which he developed outside of his work for EDC. The Massachusetts Department of Youth Services (DYS) has purchased and distributed the Dr. Birdley series to all of their educational programs across the state and incorporated it into the instructional guide for DYS science teachers. It is used in classrooms around the country and distributed abroad.

Prior to joining EDC, Katz was a science teacher for eight years and taught physical science, environmental science, biology, chemistry, and earth science at public and charter schools.  

Katz holds an EdM in teaching and curriculum from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BA in biology from Swarthmore College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Training and Technical Assistance Associate II

Program: 

EdTech Leaders Online

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2415

Abigail Levy

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Abigail Levy

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Abigail

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Levy

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Abigail Jurist Levy brings extensive experience in the fields of public K­–12 education and adult workforce development. As Co-Director of the Science and Mathematics Programs Unit, she leads a team of researchers, instructional designers, and professional developers in investigating and implementing strategies to improve students' learning outcomes.

Levy is the Principal Investigator (PI) of Science Fairs Under the 'Scope, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded study of the impact and cost-effectiveness of science fairs in the U.S. Previously, she was the PI of the three-year NSF–funded study, Elementary Science Specialists and Classroom Generalists: Are There Differences in Science Instruction, Student Achievement, and Cost?, which compared the quantity, quality, and cost of science instruction provided by elementary science specialists to that of classroom generalists.

For eight years, Levy led research associated with the Boston Science Partnership, a study that drew upon district employment data, professional development participation data, and classroom observation and interview data to identify impacts on teacher and student outcomes. She also served as the PI on several studies of teacher turnover, including an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study for REL Northeast & Islands at EDC that produced the report Developing the "Compendium of Strategies to Reduce Teacher Turnover in the Northeast and Islands Region.

Levy is the co-author of the report, Researching the Sustainability of Reform: Factors that Contribute to or Inhibit Program Endurance. She publishes her findings in journals such as Phi Delta Kappan ("The Science of Professional Development") and Science Educator ("No Teacher Left Unqualified: How Teachers and Principals Respond to the Highly Qualified Mandate" and "Models of Providing Science Instruction in the Elementary Grades: A Research Agenda to Inform Decision Makers"). In 2010, she co-authored an article in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching ("Inquiry-based Science Instruction--What Is It and Does it Matter?") that received the National Association for Research in Science Teaching's 2011 Outstanding Paper Award. More recently, she coauthored an Education Week Commentary in which she advocated for a phased-in approach to implementing the Next Generation Science Standards.

Before joining EDC, Levy was the Manager of Research and Evaluation for the Corporation for Business, Work, and Learning, where she developed research, planning, and evaluation strategies at the state level for federally funded job training programs. As a private consultant, she has worked with urban and suburban school systems on improving school-community partnerships, involving parents of hard-to-serve youth, and conducting system-wide needs assessments. She has also taught in public school classrooms and worked with state and national workforce development organizations as a policy analyst.

Levy has a BFA in Art Education from Tufts University and the Museum of Fine Arts and an MMHS and PhD in Family and Children Policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University.

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Job title: 

Co-Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2437

Kristen Bjork

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Kristen Bjork

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Kristen

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Bjork

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Kristen Bjork creates authentic, engaging STEM learning experiences for students of all ages and backgrounds. She draws on her expertise in instructional design, science, science education, and the educational uses of technology to enhance K-12 learning and teaching.

Bjork is leading the development of a new middle school cybersecurity curriculum for SAE International, and is a developer of SAE International’s Gravity Cruiser and K–3 curricula. Recently, she played a lead role in the Crystal Museum of American Arts' 2nd Annual Distance Learning Summit.

With support from the Lilly MDR-TB Partnership and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Bjork developed and launched EPIDEMIC: TB in the Global Community, an educational project spearheaded by award-winning photographer David Rochkind featuring a website and two curriculum units designed to raise awareness about tuberculosis around the world. She contributed to the development of modules in the Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies (Ford PAS) curriculum that EDC designed with the support of Ford Motor Company Fund and that can be integrated into high school mathematics and science classes.

Bjork directed the Ethnobotany Explorers and Forensic Botany Investigations curriculum projects funded by the New York Botanical Garden, as well as science curriculum development projects funded by the National Park Service and the New England Board of Higher Education. She has also been Principal Investigator for National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded projects such as digNubia: Exploring the Science of Archaeology, Enlivening Genetics Education, and GLACIER.  She also collaborates with MathResources Inc. and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC).

Before joining EDC, she was a Research Technician in a biotechnology firm.

Bjork received an AB in biology from Dartmouth College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2706

Ruth Krumhansl

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Ruth Krumhansl

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Ruth

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Krumhansl

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Ruth Krumhansl is an expert in curriculum development, education research, Earth science, science teaching, and applied science. As Founder of the Oceans of Data Institute, an initiative dedicated to fostering data literacy and transforming science education to support student entry into a world of Big Data, her work has a special focus on the design of Internet-based tools that bring authentic scientific data into K–16 classrooms.

Krumhansl leads research that is advancing the field's knowledge of how students learn to work with data and is drawing upon findings to design innovative instructional resources that help teachers foster students' data literacy, build their capacity to work with complex datasets, and support their mastery of essential tools and techniques. She is the principal investigator of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Ocean Tracks College Edition study.

In collaboration with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Krumhansl led a multidisciplinary review of studies and expert opinion and developed guidelines for the development of educational electronic interfaces to large scientific data infrastructures. The guidelines, described in the report Visualizing Oceans of Data, are being instantiated in the Ocean Tracks project, which has developed an interactive website to provide students with access to near real-time and archival data from electronically tagged marine animals, drifting buoys, and Earth-orbiting satellites, along with web-based data visualization and analysis tools.

Krumhansl is lead author of EDC Earth Science, a full-year Earth science course for high school stressing rigorous, inquiry-oriented learning, which was published by LAB-AIDS in 2014. In collaboration with SRI International and NASA, she contributed to the design of websites that allow teachers to access NASA’s remotely sensed Earth observation mission data. She is currently working with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute on the NASA-funded Real World, Real Science project, which will bring climate data to fifth- and sixth-grade students via interactive exhibits and classroom activities. 

Before joining EDC, Krumhansl was a high school science teacher and department coordinator, a chief scientist and senior project manager in environmental consulting on Superfund sites, and a petroleum exploration geologist. Her career in applied science immersed her in the search for patterns in complex geospatial data, providing a foundation for her current interest and work in preparing students to live in a data-intensive world.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2414

Josephine Louie

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Josephine Louie

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Josephine

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Louie

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Josephine Louie has extensive experience conducting research in education and social science, with a background in quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Louie is a research leader for multiple projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), including the Research + Practice Collaboratory, a national, multi-site project that is exploring methods to build stronger links between educational research and practice in STEM, and the Visual Access to Mathematics project, which is developing and studying a professional learning program to promote teachers’ use of visual representations to support mathematics learning among English Learners in the middle grades.

Louie served as the co-Principal Investigator of Ocean Tracks and the Project and Research Director of Ocean Tracks – College Edition, two R&D projects that have been creating and studying an online learning resource that provides student-friendly access to large-scale professionally collected marine biology and oceanographic data. She oversaw formative and early summative research on the NSF-funded development of the ninth-grade Transition to Algebra curriculum. As a senior researcher for the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands, funded by Institute for Education Sciences (IES) at the U.S. Department of Education, Louie published on classroom formative assessment, national and state student assessment outcomes, and education practices for high-needs student populations.

Louie is the lead author of the article, Challenges to using the Regression Discontinuity Design in educational evaluations: Lessons from the Transition to Algebra study, published by the American Journal of Evaluation in 2016. She is the co-author of the forthcoming chapter, A Collaborative Approach to Strengthening K-2 Mathematical Practices with Technology, to be published in the Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education (APME) 2017. She is the lead author or coauthor of four IES studies: “An Examination of Two State-Supported Formative Assessment Initiatives in the REL-NEI Region,” “Gender Gaps in Assessment Outcomes in Vermont and the United States,” “Math Education Practices for Students with Disabilities and Other Struggling Learners: Case Studies of Six Schools in Two Northeast and Islands Region States,” and “New Measures of English Language Proficiency and Their Relationship to Performance on Large-Scale Content Assessments.”

Before joining EDC, Louie was a researcher for the Harvard River City Project, a multiyear study of a middle school science curriculum delivered through a Multiuser Virtual Environment Experiential Simulator (MUVEES). She was a Research Associate and Outreach Coordinator for the Metro Boston Equity Initiative at the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, Senior Data Analyst for the Harvard Immigration Project, and Research Analyst at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. Louie also worked as a researcher and writer for the documentary film company Northern Light Productions and as an urban planner for Wallace, Floyd Associates in Boston.

Louie received an AB from Harvard College, a master’s in city planning from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an EdM and EdD from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2883

Cindy Hoisington

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Cynthia Hoisington

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Cindy

Last name: 

Hoisington

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Cindy Hoisington believes that authentic, cognitively challenging science experiences can be transformative for young children and their teachers. She brings to her work more than 20 years of experience teaching young children, developing educational materials, and instructing and mentoring early childhood teachers in language, literacy, and science education.

At EDC, she focuses on instructing and mentoring preschool teachers in science education research projects, and she has contributed to the development of inquiry-based science curricula and mentoring protocols as well as to teacher, classroom, and child science assessments. Currently, she is part of EDC’s team working on a four-year, $3 million U.S. Department of Education Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) project, Literacy and Academic Success for English Learners through Science (LASErS). Her previous work was on the Cultivating Young Scientists (CYS) project funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. (Read blog posts by Hoisington about her work with the National Association for the Education of Young Children's (NAEYC) Early Childhood Science Interest Forum and combatting implicit bias in the STEM classroom.)

Hoisington has directed projects aimed at getting children and adults exploring outdoors together; helping teachers use educational television to facilitate science learning; and supporting low-literacy families to scaffold children’s language development through everyday science explorations. She has customized science trainings for the State of Maryland, Family Place Libraries, United Way of Miami-Dade, University of Northern Iowa, National Education Association, National Head Start Association, and the Iowa Department of Education, and collaborated with the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

Hoisington also develops and advises on digital media initiatives aimed at promoting STEM for children, families, and teachers. She is currently part of EDC’s Ready to Learn team working with PBS. Previously she was the science advisor for the Emmy-winning educational television series Curious George, for which she received recognition from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. She has also developed online science materials for Peep and the Big Wide World and The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot about That!

Among other publications, Hoisington is the author of “Implicit bias in the STEM classroom; how to start tackling the biases that hold students back in STEM,” and “Picturing What’s Possible—Portraits of Science Inquiry in Early Childhood Classrooms;” and coauthor of “Gimme an E! Seven strategies for supporting the ‘E’ in young children’s STEM learning; Supporting children’s science learning through water explorations”; “Building a classroom community that supports English learners in preschool”;  "Foundations of Science Literacy:  Efficacy of a Preschool Professional Development Program in Science on Classroom Instruction, Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge, and Children's Observations and Predictions," “The Science and Mathematics of Building Structures,” “A Walk in the Woods: A Partnership with an Arboretum Gets Preschoolers Outside and into Science,” and "The Importance of Executive Function in Early Science Education."

Before joining EDC, she was a preschool teacher and education supervisor for ABCD Head Start in Boston, where she gained a deep appreciation for the complex challenges faced by children and families in poverty and the teachers who work with them.

Hoisington received a BS in biology from the University of Massachusetts and an MEd from Bridgewater State College. She has done post-graduate work in math and science education at University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Early Learning and Development

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2823

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