STEM

Kelsey Klein

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Kelsey

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Klein

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Kelsey Klein specializes in research, evaluation, measurement, and statistical data analysis. She has extensive expertise in survey design and implementation, with a methodological focus on psychometrics and multilevel modeling. To all of her work, she brings a deep commitment to working with practitioners to design and conduct studies that advance knowledge of effective strategies to improve outcomes for students who face significant opportunity gaps and are most at risk.  

Klein is contributing her quantitative research and methodological expertise to EDC's Beauty and Joy of Computing for New York City initiative. This National Science Foundation-funded Mathematics and Science Partnership is developing and testing an Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science Principles course​ to attract non-traditional computing students (particularly female and underrepresented minority students) to the breadth and depth of ideas in modern computer science. She is playing a key role in data collection, analysis, and reporting on the implementation and scale-up of the course.

Through her research assistantship at Boston College, Klein is also supporting EDC’s research efforts on the NSF-funded project, Supporting Success in Algebra: A Study of the Implementation of Transition to Algebra. This study is examining the implementation and impact of EDC’s Transition to Algebra, a year-long mathematics course intended to be taken concurrently with Algebra I to provide additional support for students who are underprepared for Algebra.

Klein is co-author of “Suppressor Variables: The Difference between ‘Is’ versus ‘Acting As’” (Journal of Statistics Education).

Before joining EDC, Klein was a graduate research assistant at Boston College, where she participated in the refinement of a scale to measure older adult engagement in productive activities and served as a graduate teaching assistant. She began her research and evaluation career as an undergraduate research consultant for the Center for Applied Statistics and Evaluation (CASE) at Truman State University.

Klein received a BS in Psychology from Truman State University. She is currently a doctoral candidate in Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment, formerly Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation, in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College.

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2920

Farzeen Harunani

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Farzeen Harunani

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Farzeen

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Harunani

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Farzeen Harunani brings a fresh outlook on computer science (CS) education to her work at EDC. Harunani is committed to facilitating the expansion of CS education across the country and to seeking solutions to STEM equity issues for traditionally under-represented groups in the field.

As the Coordinator of District & Teacher Engagement the Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network (MassCAN), Harunani develops and assesses professional development efforts in the state to deliver high-quality computer science education to all teachers.

Previously, Harunani served as a mentor for the Girls Who Code program.  While a student at Marquette University, she proposed and founded a tutoring initiative for Upsilon Pi Epsilon, the computing honor society, to provide additional support to CS students outside of the classroom.

Harunani received a BS in Computer Engineering from Marquette University in 2015, and an MS in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell in 2016.

 

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Associate II

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2591

Gabriela Garcia

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Gabriela Garcia

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Gabriela

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Garcia

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Gabriela Garcia brings expertise in mixed-methods evaluation design, project management, report writing, and STEM-based higher education programs. As an evaluator and researcher, Garcia strives to provide meaningful and relevant information that fosters evaluative thinking and helps improve initiatives and programs.

Garcia provides technical assistance to grantees under the National Science Foundation’s Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES), a national initiative that is working to identify and scale up proven and innovative approaches to provide access to groups traditionally underrepresented and underserved in STEM fields. She is also assisting with the evaluation of the Illinois 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) Program, which provides students with academic and youth development services and students’ families with educational and personal development opportunities.

Garcia is an active member of the American Evaluation Association (AEA), where she served as the co-chair of the mentorship program for the Multiethnic Issues in Evaluation Topical Interest Group (TIG) from 2011 to 2017. She is also a founding member of AEA’s Latino/a Responsive Evaluation Discourse TIG and contributes to the mentorship and professional development working group.

Prior to joining EDC, Garcia conducted mixed-method evaluations of a variety of foundation- and federally funded K-12 and higher education STEM and health education initiatives, and took part in the Illinois Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (I-STEM) Education Initiative. She led federally funded project evaluations, including an evaluation of a STEM scholarship program for undergraduate students and an evaluation of a validation study of an early childhood teacher evaluation framework.

Garcia received a BA in Psychology from DePaul University and a PhD in Educational Psychology with a focus on program evaluation from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

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Research Associate II

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770 North Halsted Street, Suite 205
Chicago, Illinois 60622

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Regan Vidiksis

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Regan Vidiksis

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Regan

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Vidiksis

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Regan Vidiksis is an early education researcher with extensive experience in advancing effective strategies to promote children’s early science and mathematics learning and support teachers in integrating technology into early childhood settings in developmentally appropriate ways. She specializes in deepening understanding of effective, systematic approaches to improving teaching and learning, especially among underrepresented and underresourced teachers and families.

As a researcher and project manager for EDC’s evaluation of Ready to Learn, Vidiksis contributes to studies that measure children’s learning from literacy, math, and science public media learning resources and provide new insight into ways to enhance the school readiness of preschoolers in high-need communities.

Vidiksis serves as a researcher on the Next Generation Preschool Science project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). In the project, she is working with a team to develop, iteratively refine, and evaluate the promise of an innovative early science curriculum that promotes science practices, concepts, and discourse in preschool classrooms serving children from low-income backgrounds.

Currently, Vidiksis contributes to several other EDC STEM education initiatives. She is advancing the goals of IDEAS: Inventing, Designing, and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum, an NSF-funded project aiming to develop an Engineering Design program for middle school children on the autism spectrum and their general education peers. Vidiksis is also working on Monkeying Around, an NSF-funded initiative to design, produce, and research animated and live-action videos, along with parent-child engagement resources, that seek to build preschoolers’ computational thinking skills.

Vidiksis was named a 2014-2015 CADRE Fellow, for her work in NSF Discovery Research K-12 STEM research. She regularly presents her findings at the annual conferences of national organizations, including the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics and the National Head Start Association. She has also served as a proposal reviewer for the American Educational Research Association.

Before joining EDC, Vidiksis worked as a preschool special educator through the New York City Committee for Preschool Special Education and as a special instructor through the NYC Department of Health’s Early Intervention program, providing individualized services to young children and families in school, community, and home-based settings. She also worked as a special education evaluator for these agencies, conducting developmental assessments to assist in the determination of service qualification.  

Vidiksis received a BA in English Literature and Rhetoric from Binghamton University, and an MS in Early Child Education and Special Education from Hunter College.

 

 

 

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Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY  10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4229

Kate Goddard

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Kate Goddard

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Kate

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Goddard

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Kate Goddard specializes in designing, implementing, and supporting the continuous improvement of technology- and media-based out-of-school time (OST) programs. Building on her experiences as a practitioner, she puts youth development at the center of her work, designing and supporting programs for educators that elevate inquiry and creativity as a tool for youth empowerment. Goddard contributes her expertise to initiatives that seek to strengthen and support the OST workforce, including the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), where she manages the work of the Technical Assistance Regional Representatives to ensure that school-age children in low-income families have improved access to high-quality learning experiences.

Goddard also serves as Project Director for the National Science Foundation’s Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES), a national initiative that is working to identify and scale up proven and innovative approaches for providing access to groups traditionally underrepresented and underserved in STEM fields.

Previously, Goddard advanced the mission of Adobe Foundation’s philanthropic initiative Adobe Youth Voices by building the capacity of programs and educators around the globe to implement youth media programming.

Prior to joining EDC, Goddard worked as a Program Director for the Community Technology Empowerment Project, managing and training AmeriCorps members on how to integrate media and technology into existing community technology centers. Earlier in her career, she facilitated creative learning experiences for youth at Phillips Community TV, the Science Museum of Minnesota, Denver Open Media, and Girls Inc. of Metro Denver.

She holds a BS in Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Associate Project Director

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, MA  02453-8313

Leana Nordstrom

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Leana Nordstrom

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Leana

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Nordstrom

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Leana Nordstrom brings a diverse set of communications and project management skills to an array of STEM education initiatives. Through her efforts, a broad range of projects advance their strategic plans and expand their public information outreach.

Nordstrom manages CADRE (Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education), the National Science Foundation (NSF) resource network for the Discovery Research PreK-12 Program. In this role, she oversees the project’s social media outreach and other communications, contributes to the project’s website content, and manages the logistical aspects of CADRE’s work.

As the communications lead for EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute (ODI), Nordstrom disseminates the work of ODI’s portfolio of projects through newsletters, a website, blogs, press releases, and social media. In addition, she heads up communications efforts for Science Fairs Under the ‘Scope, an NSF-funded project studying middle-school science fairs.

Since joining EDC in 2010, Nordstrom has contributed to cross-sector NSF-funded STEM forums (STEM Smart and Next Generation STEM Learning for All) and informal education (Exploring Trees and Ponds), research (Elementary Science Specialist Study), and professional development (Electronic Teacher Guide and NPASS2) initiatives.  

Before joining EDC, Nordstrom was a staff member at Public Interest GRFX, the in-house communications department for the Fund for Public Interest, and served as an Environmental Education Extension Agent in Senegal, West Africa for the Peace Corps.

Nordstrom has a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Bates College in Lewiston, Maine.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Associate

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2767

Tracy McMahon

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Tracy McMahon

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Tracy

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McMahon

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Tracy McMahon brings extensive expertise in designing and conducting quantitative and qualitative research and evaluation studies. She specializes in survey design and implementation; qualitative data collection techniques such as interviews, focus groups, and observations; the development of logic models and literature reviews; and statistical analysis. Much of her work focuses on the implementation of program evaluations that seek to identify the effectiveness of formal and informal science education programs at K-12 and institute of higher education (IHE) levels.
 
Recently, McMahon co-authored the report Engineering for Every K-12 Student based on her team's work on the Massachusetts Engineering Innovation and Dissemination Community (MEIDC), an NSF-funded landscape study of K-12 engineering education in Mass. For the past four years, she has supported the NSF Broadening Participation in Computing Alliances (BPC-A) Evaluation as liaison to alliances and collected, analyzed, and reported data on efforts to broaden participation in computer science.
 
She holds an MEd in Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation; an MA in Higher Education Administration; and a BA in Communication and Sociology from Boston College.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2830

Rebecca Schillaci

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Rebecca Schillaci

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Rebecca

Last name: 

Schillaci

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Rebecca Schillaci is committed to conducting high-quality research of educational programs. She contributes her expertise in research design, quantitative and qualitative methodologies, survey design, statistics, and data analysis to a wide range of studies.

Schillaci is an evaluator for the Think College Transition (TCT) Model Project, an inclusive dual-enrollment model aimed at improving outcomes for students with intellectual disabilities enrolled in transition services by providing them with college experiences.

Schillaci is also a team member of the NSF-funded STEM Learning and Research (STELAR) Center, the resource center for the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program. Through her work on webinars and as a project liaison, she provides technical support to ITEST projects and helps inform NSF and other stakeholders of ITEST’s impact by collecting and synthesizing data from those projects.

Previously, Schillaci served as an evaluator of an algebra curriculum in use in Connecticut (read a blog post describing the findings) and was a researcher in an NSF ITEST-funded-study of the effectiveness of technology-focused professional development. She is a co-author of an article that presents the results of that study, “Examining the Quality of Technology Implementation in STEM Classrooms: Demonstration of an Evaluative Framework” (Journal of Research on Technology in Education).

Before joining EDC, Schillaci was manager of the Child Cognition Laboratory at Boston University, where she contributed to the development, design, execution, and dissemination of several grant-funded research projects examining a broad range of topics including science learning, artifact categorization, teleological reasoning, and imitative learning in children and adults. She is coauthor on several publications based on this research, including “Children’s Conformity When Acquiring Novel Conventions: The Case of Artifacts” (Journal of Cognition and Development), “The Designing Mind: Children’s Reasoning about Intended Function and Artifact Structure” (Journal of Cognition and Development), and “Young Children Can be Taught Natural Selection Using a Picture-Storybook Intervention” (Psychological Science).

Schillaci received a BA in Psychology from Wellesley College and an MA in Developmental Science from Boston University.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate

Program: 

Leadership for Learning Innovation

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2772

Wendy Martin

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Wendy Martin

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Wendy

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Martin

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Wendy Martin leads research that advances the field's knowledge of how key aspects of education programs influence impact and participant experience. She also conducts formative research and collaborative co-design projects that advance knowledge of how to design effective educational technologies and integrate them into educational environments to support student learning.

Martin is the Principal Investigator of IDEAS: Inventing, Designing, and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum. In this initiative, she is collaborating closely with New York Hall of Science, New York University, and teachers in New York City middle schools to adapt an engineering design program for students in autism inclusion settings. As Principal Investigator of the Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning project, Martin is investigating the relationships among game design, explicit analogy mapping techniques, and students’ understanding of complex science concepts. She is also a staff member on the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) and is conducting an evaluation of the CS4All initiative in New York City with colleagues at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Previously, Martin was project manager for Possible Worlds, a National Research and Development Center in Instructional Technology, funded by the US Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, which developed a suite of four digital games and related instructional materials for middle-school science. Possible Worlds was chosen by Common Sense Media for its list of the Top 25 Ed Tech products for 2014. She recently concluded evaluations of the ScratchEd program, which provides resources and professional learning experiences to help teachers integrate the Scratch graphical programming language into formal instruction.

Martin has contributed to seminal research that has advanced the field's knowledge of the role of technology in professional development. She was the Project Director of the evaluation of the eMINTS program, a technology professional development program that has reached hundreds of teachers and thousands of students in Missouri and has been scaled up to train thousands of teachers across the U.S. and Australia. As part of the team conducting the evaluation of the Intel Teach Essentials program—a technology professional development program that has reached millions of teachers worldwide—she provided evaluation guidance to evaluators and program managers in Asia, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East.

She has coauthored several articles and reports, including "Extending the Impact of Digital Games by Supporting Analogical Reasoning" (Proceedings of the 2015 Annual Symposium of Computer-Human Interaction in Play), "Testing the Impact of a Pre-instructional Digital Game on Middle-Grade Students' Understanding of Photosynthesis" (Technology, Knowledge and Learning);  "Connecting Instructional Technology Professional Development to Teacher and Student Outcomes" (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); and "Bringing Technology Professional Development to Scale: Lessons Learned from Intel Teach to the Future" (Policy Brief).

Martin earned her BA from Duke University, her MA from New York University¹s School of Education, and her doctorate from Cornell University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4287

Joe Ippolito

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Joe Ippolito

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Joe

Last name: 

Ippolito

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Joe Ippolito provides expertise in the design and management of large-scale initiatives focused on career education and training for diverse fields. He is deeply committed to creating pathways to STEM careers and improving outcomes for at-risk young people, including youth reentering the community from juvenile detention centers.

Ippolito engages experts in documenting the skills and knowledge that professionals need to succeed. Career-technical education institutions, workforce training programs, and colleges use the resulting “professional profiles” to design curricula, workshops, and courses. Recently, for EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute, he co-led  panels of big data experts in developing the first profiles of a Big Data-enabled Professional and Data Practitioner. Previously, he co-led the development of profiles of what “Social Technology-Enabled” and “Computational Thinking-Enabled” professionals need to know and be able to do. He is the lead author of the recent case study “Defining an Emerging Occupation: Who Is the Social Technology Enabled Professional” published by Sheffield Hallam University.

As the principal investigator for a National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) research project, Ippolito is examining the extent to which best-practice social media strategies enable colleges to increase student enrollment. He is also leading an NSF-ATE project that is working with community colleges to create big-data career pathways. Previously, he supported Athens Technical College (GA) in strengthening career pathways for its students.  Ippolito has co-authored Fulfilling the Call: A Model for Unitarian Universalist Ministry in the 21st CenturyProject SMART: Local Manufacturing Industry Skill Standards, and Project SMART: Work-Based Learning in the Manufacturing Firm.

Before joining EDC, Ippolito served as Vice-President / Programs and Development for Youth Opportunities Unlimited, where he designed and managed programs to deliver comprehensive career development, job readiness, and mentoring services to middle- and high-school students. Earlier in his career, he worked as a community organizer, building interdenominational faith-based advocacy organizations in low-income communities. 

Ippolito received a BA in Religious Studies from Duke University and an MA in Religious Studies from the Divinity School of the University of Chicago    

 

 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

216-386-3051

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