Technology & Learning

Wendy Martin

Email Wendy Martin

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Wendy Martin

First name: 

Wendy

Last name: 

Martin

Bio: 

Wendy Martin leads research that advances the field's knowledge of how key aspects of education programs influence impact and participant experience. She also conducts formative research and collaborative co-design projects that advance knowledge of how to design effective educational technologies and integrate them into educational environments to support student learning.

Martin is the Principal Investigator of IDEAS: Inventing, Designing, and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum. In this initiative, she is collaborating closely with New York Hall of Science, New York University, and teachers in New York City middle schools to adapt an engineering design program for students in autism inclusion settings. As Principal Investigator of the Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning project, Martin is investigating the relationships among game design, explicit analogy mapping techniques, and students’ understanding of complex science concepts. She is also a staff member on the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) and is conducting an evaluation of the CS4All initiative in New York City with colleagues at the Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Previously, Martin was project manager for Possible Worlds, a National Research and Development Center in Instructional Technology, funded by the US Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, which developed a suite of four digital games and related instructional materials for middle-school science. Possible Worlds was chosen by Common Sense Media for its list of the Top 25 Ed Tech products for 2014. She recently concluded evaluations of the ScratchEd program, which provides resources and professional learning experiences to help teachers integrate the Scratch graphical programming language into formal instruction.

Martin has contributed to seminal research that has advanced the field's knowledge of the role of technology in professional development. She was the Project Director of the evaluation of the eMINTS program, a technology professional development program that has reached hundreds of teachers and thousands of students in Missouri and has been scaled up to train thousands of teachers across the U.S. and Australia. As part of the team conducting the evaluation of the Intel Teach Essentials program—a technology professional development program that has reached millions of teachers worldwide—she provided evaluation guidance to evaluators and program managers in Asia, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East.

She has coauthored several articles and reports, including "Extending the Impact of Digital Games by Supporting Analogical Reasoning" (Proceedings of the 2015 Annual Symposium of Computer-Human Interaction in Play), "Testing the Impact of a Pre-instructional Digital Game on Middle-Grade Students' Understanding of Photosynthesis" (Technology, Knowledge and Learning);  "Connecting Instructional Technology Professional Development to Teacher and Student Outcomes" (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); and "Bringing Technology Professional Development to Scale: Lessons Learned from Intel Teach to the Future" (Policy Brief).

Martin earned her BA from Duke University, her MA from New York University¹s School of Education, and her doctorate from Cornell University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4287

Michelle Cerrone

Email Michelle Cerrone

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Michelle Cerrone

First name: 

Michelle

Last name: 

Cerrone

Bio: 

Michelle Cerrone focuses on the role of educational technologies and digital games in supporting student learning and teacher professional development. She specializes in research methods, survey development, and statistical analysis, which she applies across a range of evaluation, research, and development projects. Her most recent work examines the design of effective tools for educators and learners to promote progressive teaching and learning of STEM in pre-K through middle school settings.

Cerrone serves as the methodologist for Playing With Data, a three-year, National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project to support middle-grades science teachers in developing data literacy and interpreting and using game-based formative assessment data to enhance student learning. She is also a researcher on Bringing Science Home with PEEP, an NSF-funded project using Design Based Implementation Research (DBIR) to identify new avenues to bring early science experience to preschool children (ages 3-5), particularly those living in communities with few resources.

As an external evaluator for the Partnership to Improve Student Achievement in Physical Science: Integrating STEM Approaches (PISA2), Cerrone is investigating the impact of a science and engineering professional development program on elementary and middle-grades science teachers. She recently led survey development and validation for the TwISLE project, which explored how social media users interact with public science institutions on Twitter. 

Cerrone’s previous projects explored the successes and challenges of facilitating and participating in online communities of practice. She also was part of the Eliciting Math Misconceptions (EM2) project, an IES-funded measurement development project that designed a diagnostic assessment system to help teachers identify student misconceptions around rational numbers.

The co-author of several articles on professional development and instrument development, including "Constructing Online Communities of Practice"  and "Recruiting Research Participants via Twitter (or Social Media)," Cerrone regularly presents her findings at the annual conferences of national organizations such as the International Society for Technology in Education and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Before joining EDC, Cerrone worked as an analyst for Success Academy Charter Schools in New York City, where she designed assessments and analyzed student, classroom, and school-level data. She began her career in education teaching English as a Second Language in the Slovak Republic, Spain, and New York.

Cerrone received a BS from Cornell University and an MA in Economics and Education from Columbia University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4204

Amy Busey

Email

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Amy Busey

First name: 

Amy

Last name: 

Busey

Bio: 

Amy Busey leads and contributes to a diverse array of initiatives that support teachers in ensuring students’ STEM proficiency and school, college, and career success. She brings significant experience in quantitative and qualitative research, strategic dissemination, and promotion of knowledge utilization. Her most recent work is deepening understanding of effective strategies to foster students’ data literacy and bridge STEM education research and practice.

As a member of EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute (ODI) team, Busey was a primary author of ODI’s Visualizing Oceans of Data report—a groundbreaking effort to provide guidelines to support interface and tool designers in bridging cyberinfrastructure to classrooms, enabling students to work with large, high-quality scientific datasets. She plays a key role in ODI’s Ocean Tracks project, which developed and tested powerful Web-based visualization and analysis tools derived from state-of-the-art knowledge about how to support student inquiry with data, and is currently engaged in related collaborative work with the Concord Consortium and the University of Minnesota on the CODAP (Common Online Data Analysis Platform).

Busey is also contributing to EDC’s R+P Collaboratory team’s efforts to identify, document, and disseminate ways that practitioners and researchers can work together effectively to enhance K–12 STEM education across formal and informal settings. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), this collaborative research/strategic dissemination work engages EDC in a partnership with the Auburn, Maine School Department to improve students’ math learning through integration of interactive mobile technologies. (Read her blog post based on this work.)

Her work to bridge STEM education research and practice in the R+P Collaboratory is one of several NSF-related dissemination efforts she has advanced. For CADRE (Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education), she provided online and print communications and networking facilitation support that helped NSF Discovery Research K–12 grantees make their findings and products accessible and usable. For NSF’s and EDC’s collaborative work to disseminate findings from the National Research Council’s report Successful K–12 STEM Education, she contributed to substantive and logistical planning of a series of STEM Smart events.  

Busey is the lead author of the article “Harvesting a Sea of Data” published in the Summer 2015 issue of The Science Teacher. She has co-authored many other articles, briefs, and reports including Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics (2015); A Targeted Study of Gaming and Simulation Projects in DRK–12 (2014); and Toward Sustainability: Cases and Cross-Case Analysis of the Strategies of MSP Project Leaders to Sustain their Teacher Leader Programs (2010).

Before joining EDC, Busey was involved in research efforts around Kindergarten readiness and infant cognitive development, implemented afterschool technology programs in middle schools, and worked to raise awareness around a variety of education issues.

Busey holds a BS in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an EdM in Mind, Brain, and Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4212

Erin Bardar

Email Erin Bardar

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Erin Bardar

First name: 

Erin

Last name: 

Bardar

Bio: 

Erin Bardar specializes in science curriculum development, professional development, and education research, with a focus on the fields of earth and space science. She draws upon her background in physics and astronomy to develop innovative and engaging instructional resources.

Bardar leads the curriculum development efforts for EDC's Oceans of Data Institute Ocean Tracks-College Edition project, which helps undergraduates learn and adopt skills needed to work with Complex, Large-scale, Interactively accessed, Professionally collected (CLIP) data from electronically tagged marine animals, drifting buoys, and Earth-orbiting satellites. She is also project director and curriculum team lead for the Real World, Real Science project, a NASA-funded collaboration with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) designed to bridge informal and formal learning around climate, weather, and data literacy. Erin has also worked as a consultant on several other instructional design projects, including Foundation ScienceFord PAS, and EDC Earth Science.

A widely published author, Bardar’s articles have appeared in such periodicals as Astronomy Education Review, The Earth Scientist, Journal of Geoscience Education, and Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society. She frequently presents her work at national conferences, including Games+Learning+Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers.

Bardar developed the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory, a diagnostic test that supports assessment of college students’ understanding of light and spectroscopy and aids investigation of the effectiveness of instructional interventions in deepening students’ understanding. She holds a U.S. patent for a binocular spectrometer.

Prior to joining EDC, Bardar worked as a freelance education consultant/curriculum developer, contributed to research on how to bridge free-choice games and formal classroom science instruction, and served as a senior curriculum developer for the EarthLabs project.

Bardar received an ScB in Physics from Brown University and was a NASA Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) fellow at Boston University, where she earned a PhD in Astronomy.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Ginger Fitzhugh

Email Ginger Fitzhugh

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

First name: 

Ginger

Last name: 

Fitzhugh

Bio: 

Ginger Fitzhugh leads evaluations that help programs leverage knowledge to achieve better outcomes for young people. She brings expertise in participatory program evaluation, systems thinking, and organizational development—as well as a commitment to identifying new strategies to advance educational access and equity, promote youth development, and foster school-community partnerships.

Fitzhugh leads a range of EDC evaluations that examine programs targeted to ensure all students receive strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educations, to enhance teacher professional development, and to improve informal and formal K–12 learning.

From 2014 to 2016, Fitzhugh served as Program Chair of the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) Systems in Evaluation Topical Interest Group. She has presented her findings at numerous AEA annual national conferences, and in 2009 she won AEA’s award for best poster presentation with Changing Horses Mid-Stream: Lessons Learned from Evaluator Transitions During Two ITEST STEM Projects. She is the author of several resources on challenges and successful strategies in conducting effective evaluations, including Survey Says? How to Visualize Survey Response Rates, Taking the Long View: Reframing Scale-Up and Sustainability Evaluations, and the EvaluATE blog post, “Show Me a Story: Using Data Visualization to Communicate Evaluation Findings.

Prior to joining EDC, Fitzhugh was a senior associate at Evaluation & Research Associates. Earlier in her career, she was a research associate at Brandeis University’s Center for Youth & Communities.

Fitzhugh received a BA in Psychology from Swarthmore College, attained an MM in Nonprofit Management and Evaluation from Brandeis University, and completed PhD coursework at Brandeis.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

206-395-4528

Randy Kochevar

Email Randy Kochevar

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Randy Kochevar

First name: 

Randy

Last name: 

Kochevar

Bio: 

Randy Kochevar, Director of EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute, has expertise in marine biology and conservation, promotion of data literacy, Web development, research, and science communications. He brings passion for science and conservation—as well as a proven ability to make complex scientific concepts engaging and comprehensible for diverse audiences—to his R&D of innovative online educational resources for teachers, students, and the public.

In the Oceans of Data Institute, Kochevar leads a team that is working to transform K–16 science education to support students' entry into a world of Big Data through instructional design, research, and strategic partnerships with education and industry leaders. Kochevar plays a key role in the Institute's Ocean Tracks project, a collaborative initiative in which EDC and Stanford University are providing students and teachers with access to authentic data collected by migrating marine animals, drifting buoys, and satellites through an interactive website that features tools that enable users to display and analyze data to examine important scientific questions about animal interactions with the ocean environment. He is the co-Principal Investigator of the Institute's Ocean Tracks College Edition and Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) initiatives.

Kochevar shares his expertise in helping scientific research programs design and implement effective educational and outreach programs at the national conferences of organizations such as the American Geophysical Union. He is a co-author of the white paper “Toward a U.S. Animal Telemetry Observing Network for Our Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes” and publishes his research in journals such as Marine Ecology and Eos.

Prior to joining EDC, Kochevar oversaw science communications for the Block Lab at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station. He has also served as consultant science communications specialist to a variety of corporations, museums, and research institutions. including the Monterey Bay Aquarium, where he worked for 11 years.

Kochevar earned his BS in Biology from Colorado College and obtained his PhD in Deep-Sea Physiology from University of California-Santa Barbara.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Wendy Rivenburgh

Email Wendy Rivenburgh

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

Wendy Rivenburgh

First name: 

Wendy

Last name: 

Rivenburgh

Bio: 

Wendy Rivenburgh is an expert in youth media education, technical support, communications, community building, and instructional design. To all of her work, she brings a deep commitment to empowering learners, supporting the creation of original works for a social purpose, and, in particular, tapping the potential of children and youth as the next generation of leaders and innovators.

Rivenburgh manages communications for the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE), funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services to ensure that low-income children have increased access to high-quality learning experiences.  She is responsible for strategic outreach and dissemination of materials, and serves as lead editor for NCASE products, including new and adapted print and electronic resources.

Rivenburgh previously led communications for Adobe Youth Voices (AYV), a project dedicated to working with educators and young people to apply their creative skills to solving real-world problems. The overarching goal was to increase creativity in education and equip youth media-makers to create social change through the power of digital storytelling.

In close collaboration with the Adobe Foundation, Rivenburgh developed a wide array of online and print communications that advance the AYV mission. She was the lead writer of an app about AYV, The AYV Story, which provides a moving, close-up view of the experiences of AYV youth media makers and educators. She was also the lead developer of the interactive AYV Program Guide, co-developed numerous curricular resources—including the video narrative curriculum, Moment of Truth—and was the author and editor of the AYV collection of program stories that highlights the experiences of participating youth and educators around the world.

Rivenburgh has contributed her skills to numerous other technology-infused youth development initiatives at EDC, including YouthLearn and the creation of a technology curriculum database for the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning at SEDL. She is the co-author of a chapter, “Working in Afterschool,” which shares lessons learned from the National Science Foundation's Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, as well as a report on the ITEST Convening, Defining an Afterschool Research Agenda.

Before joining EDC, Rivenburgh taught English literature and writing courses at the high school and college level, and worked with young people in academic enrichment and other extracurricular activities.

Rivenburgh received her BA from Middlebury College and her MA in English from Boston College.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2159

Marion Goldstein

Email Marion Goldstein

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Photo: 

First name: 

Marion

Last name: 

Goldstein

Bio: 

Marion Goldstein leads R&D and evaluations that advance knowledge of strategies to strengthen STEM education for all students. Many of her studies examine how technology can be strategically employed to enhance preK–12 teaching and learning. To all of her research, she brings an extensive knowledge of developmental psychology, program evaluation, quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, and instructional design. Working in partnership with publishers, curriculum designers, game developers, programmers, teachers, students, parents, and administrators, she helps create tools that work in real-world settings and accommodate a variety of instructional needs.

Goldstein is a co-principal investigator on Next Generation Preschool Science, a four-year National Science Foundation-funded project to develop and evaluate a program to promote young children’s learning of key science practices and concepts. She is the project director for PLUM Rx, a mobile-accessible, digital media R&D project that is working to bring environmental science learning to hard-to-reach urban families. 

In partnership with Sesame Workshop and local research partners, Goldstein works internationally to develop assessments and evaluate the promise of Dream, Save, Do, a financial empowerment program for young children funded by MetLife. Additionally, she is a senior researcher on EDC’s Ready to Learn team, which has been funded by the U.S. Department of Education since 2006 to conduct research and evaluation studies to measure children’s learning from media-rich literacy, math, and science learning resources developed by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and PBS with the goal of improving school readiness among preschoolers in high-need communities.

Goldstein served as research director for Year of the Solar System, funded by NASA, in which she directed the evaluation of digital resources designed to address the curricular needs of Grades 6–12 science teachers and students, and for Possible Worlds, an IES-funded project to develop and test a series of game-based activities to support science and literacy instruction. She presented findings from this work in a series of papers and reports, including "Using Students' Naive Theories to Design Games for Middle-Grades Science" and "Does Gameplay Prepare Students to Learn? Lessons From a Fieldtest." She also served as a lead researcher in an EDC initiative to identify and document lessons learned from New York City’s iSchool and Cisco’s 21st Century Initiative in Jefferson Parish (Louisiana) Public School System

Goldstein has co-authored numerous articles based on her research, including “What Constitutes Skilled Argumentation and How Does it Develop?” (Informal Logic), “Designing for Diversity: How Educators Can Incorporate Cultural Competence in Programs for Urban Youth” (New Directions for Youth Development), and “A Collaborative Approach to Nutrition Education for College Students” (Journal of American College Health). To support the translation of research to practice and policy-making, Goldstein regularly shares her findings at the annual conferences of such organizations as the International Society for Technology in Education, American Educational Research Association, Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Society for Research in Child Development, and Head Start.

Prior to joining EDC, Goldstein worked as a research consultant and coordinator for initiatives focused on health promotion and the evaluation and redesign of professional development.

Goldstein holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA from New York University, and an EdD in Educational Technology from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Associate

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4293

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Technology & Learning