Technology & Learning

Ben Chauncey

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Ben Chauncey

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Ben

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Chauncey

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Ben Chauncey sustains a sound fiscal infrastructure for the Learning and Teaching Division, advancing business development to ensure the Division achieves its goals to enhance the quality and equity of education. To this role, he brings extensive expertise in financial management and business analytics, as well as a strong background in nonprofit fiscal administration and educational research.

Chauncey leads a team of Division Finance Managers that anticipates and meets the rapidly evolving development and fiscal operations needs of over 200 researchers, instructional designers, professional developers, and consultants engaged in innovating to improve outcomes for students. His guidance enables the team to effectively and efficiently partner with project directors to submit proposals that result in the successful funding of mission-critical initiatives by a wide array of government agencies and private foundations.  

Previously, Chauncey served as a Division Finance Manager. In this capacity, he led the development of grant and contract budgets for teams that successfully secured multi-year, multi-million funding and headed up fiscal operations for the Center for Children & Technology. Earlier in his career at EDC, he researched the potential of partnerships between Head Start programs and child care centers to improve early education for children from low-income families—playing a key role in research design, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of findings. An issue brief by the Administration for Children & Families presents a synthesis of findings from this work.

Chauncey has co-authored research reports and articles, including: "Supporting Parents Through Head Start-Child Care Partnerships" (International Journal of Economic Development), Child Care Quality Study: The Impact of Head Start on Child Care Quality, Ohio Head Start Plus Study Final Report, and Child Care/Head Start Partnership Study.

He has completed graduate work in biostatistics at Harvard University, where he received an AB in Biology with electives in Psychology and Economics. 

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Interim Division Finance Director

Program: 

Learning and Teaching Division

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4210

Bronwyn Taggart

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Bronwyn Taggart

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Bronwyn

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Taggart

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Bronwyn Taggart, an award-winning editor and writer, has extensive experience in project management, communication management, children's media, and online animation. She contributes her expertise to R&D projects and studies that explore the potential of technology to enhance students' learning, support teachers, and improve the quality and equity of education.

Taggart manages the Playing With Data project, a three-year, two-million-dollar National Science Foundation-funded study of how teachers use digital gameplay data to inform their instructional practices. She also facilitates the use of project management tools—particularly during the set-up phase—by other projects.  Taggart advances strategic business development and communication goals by overseeing EDC’s Center for Children and Technology (CCT) website and individual project websites, doing substantive editing of grant proposals and reports, drafting scripts for videos and digital games, and supervising freelance and support staff. 

Previously, Taggart edited products and presentations for the Head Start National Center on Program Management and Fiscal Operations (PMFO). She also created copyright and permissions guidelines for PMFO.

Before joining EDC, Taggart served as an editor for AKC Publications, where she edited all columns for two national magazines and wrote about developments in veterinary medicine. The author of a best-selling non-fiction graphic anthology, she was a successful comic book writer for DC and Marvel Comics and received the Will Eisner award for Best Editor in 1996, as well as other awards for her editing and photography.

Taggart holds a BA in Psychology from Reed College—where she was named Coleman Scholar in her freshman year—has PMD Pro certification as a project manager, and is an accredited paralegal in copyright and trademark law, having received her certification from The New School.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Project Management Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4214

Deborah Rosenfeld

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Deborah Rosenfeld

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Deborah

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Rosenfeld

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Deborah Rosenfeld is an early mathematics education researcher, instructional designer, and professional developer. She is committed to improving educational outcomes for all children, particularly those from underserved communities. She has taught young children, studied teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about early childhood mathematics, and worked with teachers to develop knowledge of mathematical development. Her current work uses technology and media to engage children in narratives and games that leverage their natural curiosity and strengths as learners to develop their mathematical understanding and promote their persistence in solving problems.   

Rosenfeld leads research efforts on the Ready to Learn project, which evaluates the learning potential of public media resources. Her most recent study looked at what mathematics children learned through interactions with the Peg+Cat suite of videos and activities, as well as how their ability to self-regulate, persist, and demonstrate flexibility in solving problems might change through watching Peg and her friends model such behaviors. She is contributing her research expertise to EDC's Heising-Simons Foundation-funded initiative Finding Our Way Around, including conducting literature reviews, informing development of digital resources, and leading a team in developing an assessment to test the resources. She is also advancing the goals of Monkeying Around, an initiative focused on supporting families in fostering preschoolers' computational thinking. 

Previously, she studied how districts and schools support teachers in the implementation of reform-based mathematics curricula and the impact of that support and implementation on student achievement. She also was involved in the development of an early mathematics assessment system for 3- to 5-year-olds, was a curriculum writer for the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded elementary curriculum Think Math, and has supported teachers in implementing conceptual-based learning approaches in their elementary math classrooms. 

Rosenfeld is a co-author of the 2016 article, "Preparing Preschool Teachers to Use and Benefit from Formative Assessment: The Birthday Party Assessment Professional Development System" published in ZDM Mathematics Education. She contributed to the research reports Preschool Teachers Can Use a PBS KIDS Transmedia Curriculum Supplement to Support Young Children in Mathematics Learning: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial and Peg+Cat Content Study. She authored a paper, “Increased Perceived Efficacy for Teaching Math” in the Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College. Her unpublished dissertation was titled, “Fostering Competence and Confidence in Early Childhood Mathematics Teachers.”

Before joining EDC, Rosenfeld was a teacher at the Rashi School and the Hong Kong International School. She taught 1stand 4th grades, as well as teaching algebra to 8th graders.

Rosenfeld received an AB in Psychology from Harvard College, an EdM in Human Development and Psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a PhD in Educational Psychology with a focus on Mathematics Education from Teachers College, Columbia University.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate II

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Fl
New York, New York 10014 

Telephone: 

212-807-4248

Jim Stanton

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Jim Stanton

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Jim

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Stanton

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Jim Stanton brings a unique blend of experience in K–12 education, workforce development, political and community organizing, and business to his groundbreaking work to ensure all students have a strong foundation in computing and are ready to lead and innovate in a future economy driven by computer technology.

Stanton is the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network (MassCAN) facilitated by EDC. In this initiative, he is collaborating with industry, education, and policy leaders across Massachusetts to  enhance access to computer science education, improve professional development for teachers, and create more pathways to STEM careers. 

In December 2015, Stanton was one of two EDC computer science education leaders invited to the White House to share their expertise during the White House’s K–12 Computer Science Education Workshop. He presents regularly at national and state forums focused on computer science education, including the annual Massachusetts STEM Summit. 

In 2008, Stanton was a member of the Task Force that rewrote the Massachusetts K-12 Instructional Technology Standards and was a member of the Governor’s Readiness Committee on Teacher Recruitment, Retention and Quality. Currently, Jim is a member of the Governor’s STEM Advisory Council, the Tech Hub Collaborative Talent Working Group and serves on the Teachers21 Board of Directors.

Prior to joining EDC, Stanton founded and developed the widely acclaimed Leadership Initiatives for Teaching and Technology (LIFT²) program. LIFT² provided paid summer externships in a wide array of STEM industries and three graduate level courses for middle and high school math and science teachers. Forty corporate partners joined with the public sector to provide over $2M in stipends, course tuition, and funds for program coordination. In 2009 LIFT² was selected to participate in a National Teacher Externship retreat, organized by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, as one of ten “Best practice” externship programs in the country.

Earlier in his career, Stanton directed national education research projects at the Institute for Responsive Education and served as Executive Director of the Cambridge Civic Assn. which recruited and provided year-round support to education reform candidates for the School Committee and City Council. He consulted for the U.S. Department of Justice Community Relations Service on the Boston School Desegregation case and directed the Boston Citywide Parent’s Council under Judge Garrity’s Court Orders.

Stanton holds an MEd in Urban Education and a BA in Economics from Boston College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2456

Mary Fries

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Mary Fries

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Mary

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Fries

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EDC

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Mary Fries, a highly skilled instructional designer and professional developer, brings expertise in mathematics education, including teaching, leadership, professional development, and curriculum planning and design. Her work reflects her commitment to designing resources and interventions that address “Mathematics Trauma” and seek to close opportunity gaps in mathematics education that serve to perpetuate racism.

Fries is a web and content developer and researcher on the Beauty and Joy of Computing project, which is adapting a University of California, Berkeley introductory computer science course into a high school AP Computer Science Principles course with the goal of helping diverse students enjoy and succeed at computer science. 

Fries is also the lead developer for the iPuzzle project, a two-year research and development initiative funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) that is creating apps for users to play, build, and share arithmetic and algebraic puzzles. The project’s first app is SolveMe Mobiles. She has also contributed to EDC’s Implementing the Mathematical Practice Standards online resource for educators.

Recently, Fries coauthored EDC’s Transition to Algebra (TTA) curriculum published by Heinemann. TTA provides a full year of student and teacher materials that support struggling learners in enjoying and succeeding in algebra class. She is also the coauthor of Making Sense of Algebra: Developing Students' Mathematical Habits of Mind, a professional book that describes the teaching and learning principles espoused in TTA.  Fries provides TTA professional development for teachers around the country, and shares her work at the annual conferences of leading organizations such as the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

Before joining EDC, Fries served as the dean of mathematics, science, and technology at Windham High School in Windham, NH; as a board member and curriculum committee chair of the Academy for Science and Design Charter in Merrimack, NH; and as a member of the Windham Initiative for Renewable Energy.

Fries holds a BS in Mathematics through Mary Baldwin College’s Program for the Exceptionally Gifted, an MA in Philosophy and Religion from the California Institute of Integral Studies, and a CAGS in Mathematics Education from Boston University. 

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Curriculum/Instructional Design Associate

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2710

Ashley Lewis Presser

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Ashley Lewis Presser

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Ashley

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Lewis Presser

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Ashley Lewis Presser leads education research that has a special focus on investigating the effectiveness of preschool math and science interventions and develops assessments for children. She brings expertise in conducting quasi-experimental and randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies and has conducted RCTs on several projects, including Next Generation Preschool Math, Big Math for Little Kids, and Possible Worlds Digital Games. Her research interests include technology integration into classrooms, comprehension within various media formats, the evaluation of after-school and STEM programs, the impact of domestic violence on children's development, the moral development of gifted students, and the symbolic understanding of young children.

Lewis Presser is the Principal Investigator of Finding Our Way Around, a Heising-Simons Foundation-funded initiative to design resources for families that feature digital and hands-on activities to promote children’s understanding of spatial ideas and prepare them for success in mathematics. She also leads Next Generation Preschool Math, an R&D initiative to develop and evaluate supplemental preschool math modules that integrate digital games and non-digital classroom activities to promote young children’s learning of foundational mathematics concepts. These games are now available for free in Apple’s Appstore and the curriculum guides are available online for public use. As a member of the Next Generation Preschool Science team, she is contributing to an R&D initiative to develop and evaluate a program to promote young children’s learning of key science practices and concepts.

With a long track record of leading successful projects that focus on student learning outcomes, Lewis Presser is currently leading a formative and summative evaluation of Side x Side Project Imagine, a K-5 comprehensive arts integration pilot program in a public elementary school, As the project director for the Big Math for Little Kids evaluation, she contributed to a longitudinal RCT that investigated the impact of the curriculum on young children’s mathematics knowledge after experiencing it during both the preschool and kindergarten years. In research that built on EDC’s work as a National R&D Center on Instructional Technology, Lewis Presser worked with a team that investigated how representational choices made in the design of digital games for learning influenced student engagement with core science concepts. And, she and colleagues studied how educators used and implemented PBS LearningMedia resources and assessed how the resources impacted classroom practices, quality of instruction, and student learning. She also led a formative and summative evaluation of GreenFab,  a project-based, hands-on approach to teaching STEM concepts to high-school students that features a focus on career development in the emergent field of sustainable technologies.

Lewis Presser is the lead author of peer reviewed articles, such as “Big Math for Little Kids: The Effectiveness of a Preschool and Kindergarten Mathematics Curriculum” (Early Education and Development).  In addition, she has co-authored chapters published in Handbook of Response to Intervention (RTI) in Early Childhood and 21st Century Education: A Reference Handbook. She presents her research at national conferences such as the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, the Interaction Design & Children Conference, and the National Head Start Research Conference.

Before joining EDC, Lewis Presser worked as a research assistant at the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement. In addition to her research experience, she has extensive experience teaching both graduate and undergraduate students.  

Lewis Presser earned a BS in Psychology from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and an MA and PhD in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4264

Daniel Light

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Daniel Light

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Daniel

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Light

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Daniel Light focuses his research on the issues of school reform, social media, and the networked world, as well as technology-enhanced education across school systems both in the U.S. and internationally. He brings expertise in both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to his leadership of studies that seek to identify new strategies to improve outcomes for students, particularly those in under-resourced communities.

Light is currently coordinating the evaluation of a Sesame Workshop program on financial empowerment in India, China, Mexico, Brasil, Egypt, Chile and Bangladesh. Light is also the PI of an NSF-funded study, TwISLE (Twitter and Informal Science Learning and Engagement), that is examining the role of social media in public science discourse. To date, much of the existing literature on social media tools, such as Twitter, has involved quantitative analysis of the number of followers and has focused on the volume, rather than the nature, of the communication. In contrast, EDC's study will examine how the public understands and uses information shared by respected science institutions via social media.

Over the past 15 years, Light has led extensive research on the introduction of technology and pedagogical reform in schools throughout the developing world. He has done field research in schools in many countries, including Bosnia, Canada, China, India (Growing Changes: An Indian Case Study of Transforming Learning with Technology), Jordan, Macedonia, Russia (read a related blog post), Turkey, and Vietnam. In 2015, the United Nations' State of the World's Children 2015 report featured a chapter written by Light, and he recently authored a chapter based on his research ("Multiple Paths to the 21st Century: National Responses to Enhancing Education with ICTs in Chile, India, and Turkey") published in the book Transforming Education: Global Perspectives, Experiences and Implications.  

Light has been particularly involved in studying the use of educational technologies in Latin American countries (Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Paraguay, and Peru) and has shared this work in the book Las TIC en las aulas. Experiencias latinoamericanas (ICT in the Classroom: Experiences from Latin America), in journals such as Policy Futures in Education (An Educational Revolution to Support Change in the Classroom"), and at international conferences. In 2016, Light was an invited speaker at the Communicative Figurations Conference in Bremen, Germany; the International Conference of Education, Research, and Innovatoin in Seville, Spain; and the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies in Athens, Greece.

His research in the U.S. has encompassed a broad range of topics, including comprehensive systems of learning supports, innovative models of high school education, technology integration, the evaluation of youth development and school-to-work programs, the design of technology-related needs assessment instruments, impact studies of technology use with students, and the role of guidance counseling in helping students plan for the future. He has published this work extensively in case studies, reports, and articles, including: Rebuilding for Learning (Gainesville, GA case study); Integrating Web 2.0 Tools Into the Classroom: Changing the Culture of Learning); and "Principals for Web 2.0 Success" (Learning & Leading with Technology). (Visit ResearchGate and Academia.edu to view all of Light's publications.)

He received an MA in International Affairs from Carleton University, Canada, an MA in Sociology and Historical Studies from the New School for Social Research, and a PhD in Sociology from the New School for Social Research. 

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4223

Babette Moeller

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Babette

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Moeller

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Babette Moeller focuses on the development of and research on educational programs across the curriculum that help ensure elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students with disabilities are included in and benefit from educational reform efforts. As project director of numerous EDC R&D initiatives, she contributes her extensive experience designing and implementing technology-supported programs in general and special education, providing professional development for teachers and administrators in a variety of settings, and conducting formative and summative evaluation research.

Moeller is the Principal Investigator of an Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded study that is testing the impact of Math for All—a professional development program developed by EDC and Bank Street College of Education and published by Corwin Press—on teachers and students from Chicago Public Schools. Shown to have promise to positively affect teachers and students, Math for All prepares K–5 teachers to help students with diverse strengths and needs—including those with disabilities—achieve high-quality, standards-based learning outcomes in mathematics.

Recently, Moeller led a study of the impact of PBS LearningMedia on teachers' classroom practices, the quality of instruction, and student learning. Her team's findings indicate that PBS LearningMedia's digital content positively impacts student content knowledge and critical thinking practices when integrated into existing curriculum; teachers who participated in the study overwhelmingly reported that PBS LearningMedia made positive contributions to their classroom practices.

An active member of professional teacher organizations, Moeller represents EDC’s Center for Children and Technology within 100Kin10, a national network of organizations devoted to adding 100,000 more highly qualified STEM teachers to America’s classrooms by 2021. Moeller is also the Past President of Science Education for Students with Disabilities (SESD), a professional group affiliated with the National Science Teacher Association (NSTA). She is a proposal reviewer for the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education and contributes to expert panels and serves on national advisory boards. She is an adjunct faculty member at Bank Street College of Education and has taught courses in technology integration, media research, and child development at Fordham University's Graduate School of Education and the New School for Social Research.

In 2016, Moeller presented sessions at the 13th International Conference on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) in Hamburg, Germany, and she regularly presents at the annual conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Council, the Council for Exceptional Children, and Learning Forward. Her recent publications include: "The Benefits of Undergraduate Research Fellowships for Students with Disabilities” (CUR Quarterly); "Building Relationships, Sharing Resources, and Building Opportunities: A STEM Learning Community Builds Social Capital for Students with Disabilities" (Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability); Integrating Technology with Student-Centered Learning; "Universal Design for Learning: Facilitating Access and Participation for All Students"; and "Making Standards-Based Mathematics Accessible to Students with Disabilities."

Moeller holds a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the New School for Social Research.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Distinguished Scholar

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4205

John Parris

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John Parris

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John

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Parris

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John Parris is highly experienced in educational media, research and evaluation, instructional design, multimedia production, and project management. He contributes his expertise to a wide array of research and development of prototypes and products for science, social studies, and interdisciplinary curricula. All of his instructional design work is rooted in a deep understanding of the realities of classrooms. (Read a recent EDC publication co-authored by Parris, In Support of Educators: Strategies That Work).

Parris is a producer and designer for Zoom In! Learning Science with Data, an an NSF-funded project for creating lessonsto build high-school students' skills in using data to investigate and explain signficant problems in biology and earth Science. Originally funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as a history education tool, Zoom In! helps students read authentic primary documents, compare their perspectives, and write their own historical arguments, helping them build literacy and historical thinking skills required by the Common Core. The tool also provides embedded professional development resources for teachers.

Previously, Parris spent six years focusing on educational game research, design, and production. As the production coordinator for Possible Worlds, the IES-funded National Research and Development Center on Instructional Technology, he helped develop innovative science games for the Nintendo DSi and other handheld computing platforms. He also contributed to the development and field-testing of two Nintendo DSi handheld video games, Cipher Force and Code Invaders, designed to help improve the literacy and reading comprehension skills of struggling middle-grade students. With colleagues, he continues game-related work with an NSF-funded study, Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning, that is testing various design features of digital games in support of science learning to discern which instructional strategies can help build middle-grade students’ conceptual understanding.

Earlier in his career at EDC, Parris developed the IBM Kidsmart Early Learning Multimedia Guide. Translated into ten languages and in use around the world, the guide provides teachers and parents with information and ideas for supporting early childhood development and learning by using technology at school and at home. Over the years, he has also worked on a wide variety of initiatives that have advanced the goals of leading cultural institutions, such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Smithsonian Institution, the American Museum of Natural History, the Library of Congress, Carnegie Hall, and the New York Philharmonic. Selected resources include: The Children of Willesden Lane: A Video and Web Teaching Resource, Connecting with the Arts, and Picturing Modern America.

Prior to joining EDC, Parris worked at the Children’s Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) and Bank Street College of Education, designing educational software and serving as a technical adviser to projects integrating new technologies into formal and informal educational settings.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4213

Bill Tally

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Bill Tally

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Bill

Last name: 

Tally

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Bill Tally leads education R&D initiatives that advance the field's knowledge of how the strategic use of digital tools can make learning more rigorous, meaningful, and engaging. He brings deep expertise in interdisciplinary learning, the digital humanities, formative research, historical studies, and the sociology of education—as well as experience configuring digital archives to enable students, teachers, and the public to do authentic historical inquiry.

Tally is the principal investigator of Zoom In! Teaching Science with Data, an initiative to build high school students’ skills in using data to investigate significant problems in biology and earth science. This initiative draws upon EDC’s Zoom In, an online instructional platform named a 2016 Best Website for Teaching and Learning that Tally led the design and development of with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Tally is also leading an EDC team that is serving as the primary research collaborator for the Library of Congress's Teaching with Primary Sources program. On an ongoing basis, he conducts evaluations that help program developers assess and refine a wide array of initiatives focused on social studies, digital media resources, digital games and storytelling, the needs of diverse learners, and teacher professional development (view a full project list).

Recently, Tally headed up an effort to support the New York Philharmonic in expanding the reach of their Young People's Concerts, by developing an interactive website, Young People's Concerts Play! As co-Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation-funded eTG project, he collaborated on the design and testing of a prototype electronic teacher’s guide that helps teachers with varying knowledge and skills plan and teach a genetics curriculum, reflect on its execution, and enhance instruction.

Tally’s clients and partners have included the Library of Congress, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The New York Times, National Geographic, WNET, City University of New York, the Smithsonian Institution, MIT, Carnegie Hall, the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Chicago History Museum, and Bank Street College of Education.  

He presents his research at the conferences of organizations such as the American Educational Research Association (“The Technology Literacy Inventory: Assessing Teacher Candidates’ Readiness to Teach All Students”) and the International Society for Technology in Education (“Using Historical RPGs to Teach History Content and Critical Thinking Skills”).

Tally co-authored the book The New Media Literacy Handbook: An Educator’s Guide to Bringing New Media into the Classroom. He has also published on the use of digitized primary sources to foster historical thinking (Journal of Research on Technology in Education); the role of digital tools in enlivening social studies learning and teaching (Theory and Research in Social Education); and how history games can help engage students in historical thinking (National Historic Education Clearinghouse).

He received a BA in psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz and an MA in liberal studies from the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research (with an emphasis on American cultural history). He holds a PhD in sociology from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where his dissertation examined children’s and parents’ use of the Web in low- and middle-income homes.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

212-807-4206

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