Technology & Learning

Naomi Hupert

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Naomi

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Hupert

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Naomi Hupert leads initiatives that seek to close opportunity gaps for students who struggle to meet grade-level academic benchmarks and to identify supports required to provide all students with engaging and challenging academic instruction. Her research and development (R&D) and program evaluation work has a special focus on the use of technology to support teachers and students (read Hupert’s blog post on universal design for learning).

Hupert is a co-Principal Investigator of EDC's long-term investigation of the influence of the Ready To Learn initiative on the early learning and school readiness of young children in high-need communities. In this capacity, she has co-led a series of studies, including a randomized controlled trial study that measured the benefits to children from low-income families of a media-rich early math curriculum supplement. In an earlier phase of this work, she was the project director of Ready To Learn research that focused on literacy and is included in the What Works Clearinghouse. In 2016, she contributed to three widely-distributed publications that shared findings from her Ready To Learn research: the report Reflections on the Ready to Learn Initiative 2010 to 2015; an article in Journal of Children and Media (Dramatic Change, Persistent Challenges: A Five-Year View of Children's Educational Media as Resources for Equity); and the EDC white paper Early STEM Learning and the Roles of Technologies.

Over the years, Hupert has led a wide variety of formative and summative evaluations that have guided program designers in improving delivery and content to enhance children’s and youth’s learning. She has examined the impact of Sesame Workshop’s programming on children and teachers in early learning settings, and has worked to evaluate Lawrence Hall of Science's development of multimedia educative curriculum materials (MECMs) to support middle school science teachers in teaching scientific argumentation. Recently, she concluded a small classroom implementation study of StarWalk Writer, a cloud-based platform that creates a collaborative environment for upper elementary and middle school reading, writing, and research. For seven years, she led formative and summative evaluations of New Mexico’s K–3 Reading First program implementation.

Previously, Hupert served as the literacy content developer for the PowerUp What Works professional development resource developed by EDC, AIR and CAST. Her findings appear in periodicals such as Early Childhood Research Quarterly (“Supplementing Literacy Instruction with a Media-Rich Intervention: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial”), Journal of Computing in Teacher Education, and Journal of Research on Technology in Education. She is the lead author of the chapters “Using Technology-Assisted Progress Monitoring to Drive Improved Student Outcomes” and “Results in the Palms of Their Hands: Using Handheld Computers for Data-Driven Decision Making in the Classroom, and has co-authored numerous reports (Five States’ Efforts to Improve Adolescent Literacy).

Hupert regularly presents her findings at the annual conferences of such organizations as Games+Learning+Society (GLS), National Association for the Education of Young Children, National Head Start Association, International Society for Technology in Education, American Educational Research Association, Association for Mathematics Teacher Educators, Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, and Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. She has served as a proposal reviewer for the American Educational Research Association and the National Reading Conference.

Hupert holds a BA in American and British Literature from Scripps College and an MS in Education, with a specialization in literacy and language-related learning disabilities, from Bank Street College of Education.

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Job title: 

Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

707-829-8532

Marian Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale

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Marian

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Pasquale

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Marian Pasquale has deep expertise in middle grade and high school science professional development, technical assistance, and curriculum development. She leads and co-leads numerous innovative science education initiatives and designs and leads professional development that focuses on integrating inquiry into standards-aligned science instruction.

Pasquale is the co-Principal Investigator of EDC's Science Fairs Under the 'Scope study, an in-depth investigation of science fairs in the U.S. that will provide new insights into if and how science fairs increase students’ interest in STEM and/or STEM careers, if and and how participation in select models of middle school science fairs enhance students’ mastery of the science and engineering practices, and the costs and resources required to implement an effective middle school science fair. She is also the science specialist for the Amgen Biotech Experience Program Office at EDC.

In her work for the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory that EDC co-leads, Pasquale authored and co-authored several publications focused on effective strategies to enhance STEM instruction and improve STEM learning outcomes for young children. These include: "Productive Struggle in Mathematics," "How Teachers Can Develop Formative Assessments That Fit A Three-Dimensional View of Science Learning," and "Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics."

Pasquale served as the Senior Science Curriculum Developer for EDC's National Research and Development Center on Educational Technology. In this capacity, she collaborated with colleagues to develop four digital games—and related professional development materials for teachers—that are designed to help improve students' understanding of phenomena that are often the subject of scientific misconceptions. Previously, she served as a professional development specialist for EDC's Foundation Science high school curriculum and was a senior curriculum writer for EDC’s Insights in Biology high school curriculum.

For several years, Pasquale has developed and led courses—including "Teaching Science Through the Inquiry Process" and "Project-Based Classroom Science"—for the Massachusetts State Science and Engineering Fair. In summer 2014, she designed and taught an Earth Science Professional Development Institute funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education.

Pasquale regularly presents on the topics of middle school science, assessment, science and literacy, and the use of games to enhance science learning. Recently, she has provided sessions at the National Science Teachers Association Annual Conference, the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association ("Using Students' Naive Theories to Design Games for Middle Grades Science"), the National Association for Research on Science Teaching Annual Conference, the WNET Celebration of Learning, and the Games, Learning, and Society Conference.

She is the co-author of the books Making Science Mentors: A 10-Session Guide for Middle Grades and Guiding Curriculum Decisions for Middle-Grades Science, as well as the articles "Providing School and District-Level Support for Science Education Reform" (Science Educator) and "Models of Providing Science Instruction in the Elementary Grades: A Research Agenda to Inform Policy Makers" (Science Educator).

Pasquale has consulted with public television in the development of the Learning Science Through Inquiry series funded by Annenberg/CPB. She has designed and conducted professional development and technical assistance for middle and high school administrators and teacher leaders throughout the nation, including the Portland (OR), New York City, Cambridge (MA), and Fort Wayne (TX) public schools. 

Before joining EDC, Pasquale was the K–6 Science Coordinator for the Haverhill. Massachusetts, Public Schools, where she was a seventh and eighth grade science teacher for over 20 years.

Pasquale received a BA from Emmanuel College and an MEd in Curriculum, Instruction, and Administration in Science Education from Boston College.

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Job title: 

Senior Research Scientist

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2417

Nevin Katz

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Nevin Katz

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Nevin

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Katz

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Nevin Katz, a former science teacher, brings experience in online interactive development, mathematics and science instructional design, and design and facilitation of blended learning courses for K–12 teachers.

Katz advances the goals of a wide variety of initiatives across the Learning and Teaching Division and throughout EDC. Drawing on his technical expertise—iOS app development, front-end web development, Drupal theming, and the use of art and animation to convey key concepts—he helps teams create interactive learning experiences that engage and inform target audiences. Recently, Katz contributed to the development of a website, "Exploring Infectious Diseases," for high school and college biology students, their instructors, and adult learners. 

Katz also served as a member of a team that designed and tested a prototype Electronic Teacher Guide (eTG) designed to support teachers in implementing curriculum.The eTG features Biology Learning Experiences, tools to support teachers in reflecting on their practice, and related resources on topics such as holding productive discussions in the science classroom and using formative assessment. In this initiative, he helped develop eTG animations and videos that support teachers’ “mindful modification” of core curriculum.

Katz's recent projects include developing interactive self-assessment activities used in an online art history course for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art that was awarded a 2015 Gold MUSE award by the American Alliance of Museums; the Health Moments: Preventing Illness iOS app for Head Start home visitors; HP Learning Initiative for Entrepreneurs (HP Life) e-learning; and Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide. For seven years, he has designed science interactives (“Exploring the Seasons”) and courses (“Using Technology to Explore Weather and Climate”) for EDC’s EdTech Leaders Online program and facilitated ETLO courses.

Katz is a co-author of the EDC publication In Support of Educators: Strategies That Work and the author/illustrator of the Dr. Birdley Teaches Science series of teacher resource books, which he developed outside of his work for EDC. The Massachusetts Department of Youth Services (DYS) has purchased and distributed the Dr. Birdley series to all of their educational programs across the state and incorporated it into the instructional guide for DYS science teachers. It is used in classrooms around the country and distributed abroad.

Prior to joining EDC, Katz was a science teacher for eight years and taught physical science, environmental science, biology, chemistry, and earth science at public and charter schools.  

Katz holds an EdM in teaching and curriculum from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BA in biology from Swarthmore College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Training and Technical Assistance Associate II

Program: 

EdTech Leaders Online

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2415

Pam Buffington

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Pam Buffington

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Pam

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Buffington

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Pam Buffington provides technical support in evidence based policy development and decisionmaking to state and local education agencies and is a project leader in the development and management of multiple professional development initiatives. She is an expert in technology integration in education with extensive work in the areas of mathematics and science, and has designed and implemented online and face-to-face professional development materials. As Co-Director of the Science and Mathematics Programs Unit, she leads a team of researchers, instructional designers, and professional developers in investigating and implementing strategies to improve students' learning outcomes.

Buffington is EDC's co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of the National Science Foundation-funded Research and Practice Collaboratory, an initiative focused on equity-oriented STEM education improvement. In this work, she leads a partnership with the Auburn, Maine School Department to improve student learning of mathematics in the early grades through the integration of interactive mobile technologies such as iPads. She has presented this work extensively at convenings such as the 13th annual International Congress on Mathematical Education and the conferences of organizations such as the National Rural Educators Association, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics.

As the co-PI of EDC's Visual Access to Mathematics study, Buffington is working with Mark Driscoll and Johannah Nikula to develop and study a blended-learning professional development program that will address the critical need to support middle-grades mathematics teachers in enhancing English learners' mathematics learning and promoting their college and career readiness. She also serves as a State Liaison and Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance Facilitator for the Institute of Education Sciences (IES)-funded REL Northeast & Islands and a STEM technical assistance provider for Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) program grantees.

Buffington was the PI of the IES-funded Eliciting Mathematics Misconceptions: A Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment System, an initiative that developed and validated diagnostic formative assessments in the content area of rational numbers. She was also the Project Director for several initiatives, including the Maine Impact Study of Technology in Mathematics Intervention; the Enhancing and Extending the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives Project; SELECT Math Professional Development Intervention, Boston; and District Level Consultation–Standards-Based Mathematics Instruction. She also served as lead mathematics specialist in support of Maine’s Learning Technology Initiative.

In 2016, Buffington was selected to be the Richard H. Balomenos Lecturer by the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in New England (ATMNE) and presented the keynote “Strategic Use of Mobile Technologies as an Equity Move” at the ATMNE Conference. She also published her work extensively in 2016. She is a co-author of the chapter “Partnership-Based Research Approaches” in Rural Education Research: State of the Science and Emerging Directions, and co-authored the article “Enhancing Use of Learning Sciences Research in Planning for and Supporting Educational Change: Leveraging and Building Social Networks” (Journal of Educational Change). Through her work on the R+P Collaboratory, she has co-authored a series of briefs and reports on the role that interactive technology can play in enhancing mathematics learning, including Preliminary Guidelines for Using Interactive Mobile Technologies in Early Elementary Mathematics, Supporting Equity Through Co-Investigation: Sharing Student Videos, and Research+Practice Partnerships: Fostering Equitable Collaborations.

Before joining EDC, Buffington was the Director of Technology and Assessment Development for Learning Effects in Falmouth, Maine; a Project Director at TERC in Cambridge; and an adjunct faculty member at the Graduate School of Education, Instructional Technology Program, at Bridgewater State College. She has worked as a mathematics teacher and technology coordinator.

Buffington received a BS in secondary education and mathematics with a minor in Physics from University of Maine at Farmington, an MA in curriculum and instruction from Lesley College, and a PhD in education (integrating multicultural education, technology, and educational practice) from the Union Institute.

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Job title: 

Co-Director

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

36 Brunswick Avenue
Gardiner, Maine 04345

Telephone: 

207-588-5022

Rebecca Carey

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Rebecca Carey

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Rebecca

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Carey

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Rebecca Carey provides leadership and management on large- and small-scale contracts and grants for research and evaluation projects at EDC. She brings experience in educational research, with a focus on collaborative research, and program evaluation, including randomized controlled trials of models of online professional development.

Carey is a Project Director for the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences. She oversees a large portfolio of education research studies and technical assistance activities in response to the needs of state and local education agencies across the region. She manages partner relationships and research staff to create relevant, responsive, and rigorous responses to education research questions as well as events bringing researchers and practitioners together to discuss bridging research findings into policy and practice.  She is also the EDC-based Project Director for i3 Implementation Technical Assistance which provides assistance to i3 grantees across the nation in both one on one TA and in communities.

She works with Westat, American Institute of Research, WestEd, Education Consultant Associates, Chesapeake Research Associates and Nimble Assessments, and she has worked closely with the Louisiana Department of Education to provide ongoing evaluation support to its Virtual Academy.

Carey recently coauthored "Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices: Strategies from Investing in Innovation." She is coauthor of “Developing a Coherent Research Agenda: Lessons from the REL Northeast & Islands Research Agenda Workshops, as well as several publications on virtual education, including “Online Courses for Math Teachers: Comparing Self-Paced and Facilitated Cohort Approaches”; “A Study of the Effectiveness of the Louisiana Algebra I Online Course”; “Comparing Self-paced and Cohort-based Online Courses for Teachers"; “Face-to-Face and Online Professional Development for Mathematics Teachers: A Comparative Study.” She also produced The Reinventing Education Change Toolkit, an online resource for schools and districts undertaking systemic change. She was a peer reviewer for The Journal of Technology, Learning and Assessment.

Before joining EDC, Carey was an organization change consultant for IBM, working with corporate and education clients and overseeing the creation of The Change Toolkit. She was also a high school history teacher.

Carey received a BA from Vassar College and an EdM from Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Research, Evaluation, and Policy

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2892

Sarita Pillai

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Sarita Pillai

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Sarita

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Pillai

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Sarita Pillai, an expert in effective strategies to broaden students' participation in STEM learning and careers, leads national resource centers that advance innovative R&D and deepen understanding of effective strategies to enhance the quality and equity of STEM education. She specializes in forming and sustaining strong communities of practice focused on improving STEM education and designing powerful technology-based resources that help engage and interest youth in STEM.

Pillai is the Principal Investigator of the NSF's STEM Learning and Research Center at EDC, which deepens the impact of the national ITEST program through technical support, dissemination, and outreach to better prepare a diverse, skilled, and innovative STEM workforce. She is the co-PI of the Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL), and she is the co-PI of an NSF-funded initiative to lead a four day workshop at EDC headquarters in Waltham, Mass. that will engage renown researchers, K-12 educators, and disciplinary scientists in identifying effective strategies to support K-12 students’ computational thinking.

With her colleagues, Pillai has designed successful participatory design approaches to engaging underrepresented youth in STEM learning and future careers by placing them at the center of design and development efforts. She drew upon this approach to collaborate with middle schoolers to develop a series of math and science virtual learning experiences as part of the Middle School Portal project. She also used the approach to partner with teenage girls, who served as primary content producers for a series of Web-based videos on science and engineering careers (Girls Communicating Career Connections) and to facilitate the design of the youth-developed FunWorks science career exploration digital library.

Pillai is the coauthor of the report Next Generation STEM Learning For All (2016), the coauthor of a book on gender and equity in education, More Than Title IX: How Equity in Education Has Shaped the Nation (2009), and the coauthor of the chapter "Equity and Diversity" in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers. She regularly presents her work at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, the Massachusetts STEM Summit, and the National Science Teachers Association.

Before joining EDC, Pillai held various positions in software development, marketing, and business development.

She received a BS in computer science from Northeastern University and an MBA from Bentley University.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2164

Tony Streit

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Tony Streit

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Tony

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Streit

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Tony Streit is a nationally recognized expert in media education, youth development, out-of-school time, and informal STEM learning. He is dedicated to helping educators harness 21st-century tools to provide hands-on, student-centered learning that engages, motivates, and inspires young people. He specializes in providing direct consultation and assistance to the philanthropic community, tailoring services to meet the needs of both corporate and private funders.

Streit is Principal Investigator for EDC's National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment (NCASE). Funded by the Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care, EDC and its partners—the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST), the National Summer Learning Association, and WRMA, Inc.—are providing materials and training to ensure that all school-age children can access high-quality afterschool and summer learning experiences that promote their development and academic achievement.

Since 2002, Streit has directed The YouthLearn Initiative, a broad array of research, promising practices, and curricular strategies on community-based, contextual learning intended to build critical thinking, creativity, content knowledge, and other skills that are essential to college and career success. Streit and his team provide professional development, program materials, research and evaluation, and technical assistance to organizations and educators in both formal and nonformal settings.

For 10 years, Streit led program management of the Adobe Youth Voices initiative, a global professional development effort for both in-school and afterschool educators in youth media-making.  From 2013 to 2015, Streit’s team provided technical assistance for The Robert R. McCormick Foundation's Why News Matters, a three-year initiative to advance news literacy across Chicago. In addition to his project work, Streit serves as the Director of EDC’s corporate office in Chicago, where he provides guidance to local project staff and oversees regional outreach and development.

Streit has been a consultant and trainer on project-based learning (PBL) in afterschool for the Massachusetts Department of Education’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers program for over 10 years. Through workshops coordinated by NIOST, Streit facilitates train-the-trainer style experiences emphasizing the value of creativity and critical thinking skills, inquiry as an instructional approach, and intentional connections to school-day learning. Through this work, a PBL approach has now become a required element of all afterschool programs in Massachusetts.

Similar past projects include co-development of The Afterschool Academies, a comprehensive training approach for afterschool educators developed for the Mott Foundation, management of the National Science Foundation (NSF) ITEST Learning Resource Center (now STELAR, for which Streit is a senior advisor); and consultation with the Verizon Foundation on best strategies to engage afterschool educators in their use of the Thinkfinity educator portal.  He has also collaborated with Noyce Foundation, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Bechtel Foundation, SEDL, MIT Media Lab, Open Society Institute, Time Warner, Kellogg Foundation, USAID, National Institute for Out of School Time, and numerous schools, youth centers, state agencies and school districts across the US and overseas.

Streit is the co-creator of Adobe Youth Voices Program Guide and the co-author of ITEST Convening Report: Defining an Afterschool Research Agenda and the chapter "Working in Afterschool" published in the report Preparing Tomorrow's STEM Workforce Through Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers.  

Currently, Streit is a Board Member and the Treasurer of the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE) and served as Chair of NAMLE’s 2017 National Conference in Chicago. Previously, he served on the Technical Working Group on STEM for the US Department of Education's 21st Century Community Learning Center Program. He has also served as an advisor to the Next Generation Youth Work Coalition, the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, the Informal Learning in Science and Afterschool Project, and the Ready to Learn Partnership.

Before joining EDC, Streit was Co-Founder and Co-Director of Street-Level Youth Media, a Chicago organization that he helped build into a nationally recognized youth development model.

Streit received a BA in communications and economics from University of Notre Dame, and studied documentary filmmaking at Columbia College Chicago.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Managing Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

770 North Halsted Street, Suite 205
Chicago, Illinois 60622

Telephone: 

312-962-4521

Kristen Bjork

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Kristen Bjork

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Kristen

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Bjork

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Kristen Bjork creates authentic, engaging STEM learning experiences for students of all ages and backgrounds. She draws on her expertise in instructional design, science, science education, and the educational uses of technology to enhance K-12 learning and teaching.

Bjork is leading the development of a new middle school cybersecurity curriculum for SAE International, and is a developer of SAE International’s Gravity Cruiser and K–3 curricula. Recently, she played a lead role in the Crystal Museum of American Arts' 2nd Annual Distance Learning Summit.

With support from the Lilly MDR-TB Partnership and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Bjork developed and launched EPIDEMIC: TB in the Global Community, an educational project spearheaded by award-winning photographer David Rochkind featuring a website and two curriculum units designed to raise awareness about tuberculosis around the world. She contributed to the development of modules in the Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies (Ford PAS) curriculum that EDC designed with the support of Ford Motor Company Fund and that can be integrated into high school mathematics and science classes.

Bjork directed the Ethnobotany Explorers and Forensic Botany Investigations curriculum projects funded by the New York Botanical Garden, as well as science curriculum development projects funded by the National Park Service and the New England Board of Higher Education. She has also been Principal Investigator for National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded projects such as digNubia: Exploring the Science of Archaeology, Enlivening Genetics Education, and GLACIER.  She also collaborates with MathResources Inc. and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC).

Before joining EDC, she was a Research Technician in a biotechnology firm.

Bjork received an AB in biology from Dartmouth College.

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Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Senior Project Director

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2706

Ruth Krumhansl

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Ruth Krumhansl

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Ruth

Last name: 

Krumhansl

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Ruth Krumhansl is an expert in curriculum development, education research, Earth science, science teaching, and applied science. As Founder of the Oceans of Data Institute, an initiative dedicated to fostering data literacy and transforming science education to support student entry into a world of Big Data, her work has a special focus on the design of Internet-based tools that bring authentic scientific data into K–16 classrooms.

Krumhansl leads research that is advancing the field's knowledge of how students learn to work with data and is drawing upon findings to design innovative instructional resources that help teachers foster students' data literacy, build their capacity to work with complex datasets, and support their mastery of essential tools and techniques. She is the principal investigator of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Ocean Tracks College Edition study.

In collaboration with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Krumhansl led a multidisciplinary review of studies and expert opinion and developed guidelines for the development of educational electronic interfaces to large scientific data infrastructures. The guidelines, described in the report Visualizing Oceans of Data, are being instantiated in the Ocean Tracks project, which has developed an interactive website to provide students with access to near real-time and archival data from electronically tagged marine animals, drifting buoys, and Earth-orbiting satellites, along with web-based data visualization and analysis tools.

Krumhansl is lead author of EDC Earth Science, a full-year Earth science course for high school stressing rigorous, inquiry-oriented learning, which was published by LAB-AIDS in 2014. In collaboration with SRI International and NASA, she contributed to the design of websites that allow teachers to access NASA’s remotely sensed Earth observation mission data. She is currently working with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute on the NASA-funded Real World, Real Science project, which will bring climate data to fifth- and sixth-grade students via interactive exhibits and classroom activities. 

Before joining EDC, Krumhansl was a high school science teacher and department coordinator, a chief scientist and senior project manager in environmental consulting on Superfund sites, and a petroleum exploration geologist. Her career in applied science immersed her in the search for patterns in complex geospatial data, providing a foundation for her current interest and work in preparing students to live in a data-intensive world.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Principal Research Scientist

Program: 

Science and Mathematics Programs

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2414

Shelley Pasnik

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Shelley Pasnik

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Shelley

Last name: 

Pasnik

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Shelley Pasnik leads a team that advances knowledge of how the thoughtful use of technology can support educators in enhancing learning, engaging families, and closing opportunity gaps. Her long-term research on young children and technology is providing evidence of effective strategies to foster school readiness and success—especially for young children living in impoverished communities—that is helping inform policy-making and practice in the U.S. and around the world.

Since 2006, Pasnik has served as the Principal Investigator of studies that are examining the impact of Ready To Learn, a federal program that uses transmedia to improve the literacy and STEM skills of children in high-need communities. She has published findings from this research in an extensive series of reports—including, most recently, Reflections on the Ready To Learn Initiative—and journal articles (e.g., The Journal of Children and Media and Early Childhood Research Quarterly). She also shares insights from this work at national forums (e.g., White House Symposium on Early STEM Learning and 2016 Fostering STEM Trajectories) and the conferences of organizations such as American Educational Research Association, Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, and the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Pasnik and her team collaborate with the U.S. Department of Education, National Science Foundation, PBS, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Google, MIT Media Lab, MOUSE, Benton Foundation, SRI International, IBM, NySci, WGBH, Thirteen/WNET, Carnegie Hall, Global Kids, New America, Sesame Workshop/Joan Ganz Cooney Center, and IBM, among others. Currently, she sits on advisory boards for Apple ConnectEd and Games for Change; previously, she was a board member for Global Action Project (2003–2013).

Throughout her career, Pasnik has developed resources and written articles to support parents and educators in weaving technology-enhanced explorations into learning in the classroom and at home. These include the Parents Guide to Children and Media for PBS, a series of articles for Cable in the Classroom, and features for Discovery Education. She speaks frequently to national and local journalists and blogs for organizations such as Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning & Children’s Media and Joan Ganz Cooney Center.

Follow Pasnik on Twitter.

Staff: 

Non-Staff Profile

Job title: 

Vice President and Director

Program: 

Center for Children and Technology

Mailing Address: 

96 Morton Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10014

Telephone: 

(212) 807-4255

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