Should All Children Learn to Code?

EDC mathematics expert Paul Goldenberg is spotlighted in this feature on the important role that exploring computer science plays in helping children learn math: It was during a 1989 visit to Bulgaria that Paul Goldenberg watched elementary school students use programming as a tool for refining and communicating mathematical ideas. What he observed at that school helped crystallize his thinking that programming belongs in the elementary classroom. "As children’s mathematical ideas matured from one grade to another, they could use computer programming to express, test, and explore those ideas,” he recalls. “It was about having expressive language, not about turning them into future computer scientists at all.”

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EDC Newsroom

Publication Date: 

Mon, 04/10/2017

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New Report Tracks Policy Progress on Expanding K–12 Computer Science Education

CS Ed Policy Report

A new report describing the progress of U.S. states in achieving 10 policy priorities for improving and expanding K–12 computer science (CS) education was released today at a national workshop led by Google, EDC, and the Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network (MassCAN) on Google’s Cambridge campus. The report highlights key strategies and issues state leaders must address regarding CS education.

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Opening Doors to Computer Science

EDC is leading a PreK-16 computer science education initiative to prepare students for life in our wired world and its workplaces. This feature article spotlights two of our projects related to computer science and computational thinking: Beauty & Joy of Computing NYC and Massachusetts Computing Attainment Network. “The real power of computer science is that it gives you a language to help you do stuff you want to do,” says June Mark. “That power to create things can be harnessed to attract more students to computer science. We need to use that to actively recruit kids who might not see themselves as computer scientists or interested in this field...” “Student interest in computer science keeps expanding, but there are not enough teachers to teach the subject,” Jim Stanton says. “We have to help districts scale up their efforts to offer high-quality computer science courses, and to train and retain teachers who are qualified to teach the subject.”

Source: 

EDC Newsroom

Publication Date: 

Fri, 03/31/2017

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Cracking the Code: Giving More Students Access to Computer Science

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Guest blogger Loretta Goodwin, PhD is senior director of the American Youth Policy Forum. Dr. Goodwin brings extensive experience in middle and high school reform, experiential education, and international education to her work convening policymakers, practitioners, and researchers to frame issues, inform policy, and create conversations about improving education and young people’s lives. In this post, originally published on AYPF’s Forum For Thought Blog, Dr. Goodwin reflects on an Education Commission of the States gathering that focused on computer science education as an economic imperative that is key to building a strong future workforce. She spotlights strategic steps that states need to take to make sure all youth graduate from high school with the computational thinking, employability, and technical skills they need to thrive in the workplace. 

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On the Program for K-12: Computational Thinking

In this special Issues & Insights feature published in honor of Computer Science Education Week, EDC Managing Project Director Joyce Malyn-Smith explains why it is so important for all students to have strong computational thinking skills and discusses what teachers can do to help students develop these skills: "There are certain things that all teachers can do to foster computational thinking skills in the classroom. Helping students learn how to break sophisticated problems into component parts is one thing. Helping them test, evaluate, refine their ideas, and find patterns among data—especially in math and science—are other ways. Even just using the technical language of computational thinking—words such as abstraction, model, and simulate—helps students grasp some fundamentally important ideas."

Source: 

EDC Newsroom

Publication Date: 

Tue, 12/20/2016

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EDC Conducts National Survey on Supporting Struggling Math Learners

Amy Brodesky

EDC is leading a national survey that will provide new insights into the strategies schools and districts are using to support middle grades students who are struggling with mathematics. This April and May, a team led by Amy Brodesky will send the short online survey to a nationally representative sample of over 2,000 public schools in all 50 states.

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How to Achieve Computer Science For All

Published in honor of Computer Science Education Week 2016, this EDC Expert Roundtable features four EDC experts--Paul Goldenberg, Leslie Goodyear, Jim Stanton, and Joyce Malyn-Smith--sharing what EDC is learning what it will take for all students who are interested in computer science to have the opportunities they deserve.

Source: 

EDC Newsroom

Publication Date: 

Fri, 03/31/2017

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EDC Shares STEM Expertise at New America Forum

Cindy Hoisington

On March 16, EDC Senior Instructional Design Associate Cindy Hoisington (at left) represented EDC as a featured panelist in the livestreamed New America Forum, “What’s Next for STEM Education? Boosting Teachers and Teaching, PreK–12.” A national early STEM education expert, Cindy Hoisington is a contributor to STEM Starts Early, one of several new reports that the panel discussed.

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