Out-of-School Time

5 Key Practices and 10 Ideas for Educators to Assist with Culturally Responsive Family Engagement

Tue, 09/06/2016

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This EDC tip sheet responds to research findings that show that students with engaged families are more likely to earn higher grades and test scores, enroll in higher level academic programs, be promoted on time and earn more credits, adapt better to school and attend more regularly, have better social skills and behaviors, and graduate and go on to post-secondary opportunities. Today, many K-12 schools are struggling to engage all families.

5 Key Practices and 10 Ideas for Educators to Assist with Culturally Responsive Family Engagement

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1 pg.

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Resilient Kids: 10 Effective Strategies to Build Young Children's Bounce

Tue, 09/06/2016

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This EDC tip sheet focuses on resilience: the ability to bounce back from or cope with life’s difficulties. Resilient children seem to face difficulty with a sturdy disposition. Instead of fight, flight, or freeze, they seem to think, “How can I solve this problem?” This ability is very useful in and beyond the K-12 learning years, and educators and families can use this tip sheet's 10 simple, yet very effective, strategies to help build children's resilience.

Resilent Kids: 10 Effective Strategies to Help Build Young Children's Bounce

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1 pg.

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Back to School: Finding Quality Afterschool Child Care

In her former role as project director of the National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment, Sue Foley shares her expertise in this article on what programs and parents can do to facilitate a seamless transition from child care or preschool settings to school-age and aftercare settings: "Just as any family should feel welcomed in and connected with their child’s early education program, afterschool programs should meet this same expectation. Some important qualities to look for in ensuring that young school-age children will be successful in afterschool programs are highlighted in our NCASE publication, Spotlight on Quality: Low child-to-staff ratios, a positive emotional climate, a clear program structure and appropriate supervision, flexible programming and planned activities that promote autonomy and choice, and continuity with the regular school day."

Source: 

Child Care Aware of America Newsroom

Publication Date: 

Thu, 08/11/2016

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Tracy McMahon

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Tracy McMahon

First name: 

Tracy

Last name: 

McMahon

Bio: 

Tracy McMahon brings extensive expertise in designing and conducting quantitative and qualitative research and evaluation studies. She specializes in survey design and implementation; qualitative data collection techniques such as interviews, focus groups, and observations; the development of logic models and literature reviews; and statistical analysis. Much of her work focuses on the implementation of program evaluations that seek to identify the effectiveness of formal and informal science education programs at K-12 and institute of higher education (IHE) levels. (Read her blog post "Resources to Help Parents Support Kids' STEM Interests and Explorations.")
 
Recently, McMahon co-authored the report Engineering for Every K-12 Student based on her team's work on the Massachusetts Engineering Innovation and Dissemination Community (MEIDC), an NSF-funded landscape study of K-12 engineering education in Mass. For the past four years, she has supported the NSF Broadening Participation in Computing Alliances (BPC-A) Evaluation as liaison to alliances and collected, analyzed, and reported data on efforts to broaden participation in computer science.
 
She holds an MEd in Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation; an MA in Higher Education Administration; and a BA in Communication and Sociology from Boston College.

Staff: 

Staff Profile

Job title: 

Research Associate

Program: 

Pathways to College and Careers

Mailing Address: 

43 Foundry Avenue
Waltham, Massachusetts 02453-8313

Telephone: 

617-618-2830

Dramatic Change, Persistent Challenges: A Five-Year View of Children’s Educational Media as Resources for Equity

Thu, 03/10/2016

Author(s): 

Shelley Pasnik, Carlin Llorente, Naomi Hupert, Savitha Moorthy

EDC researchers and colleagues from SRI have published a new article in a special commemorative issue of Journal of Children and Media that celebrates the publication’s 10-year anniversary. The article provides a review of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB)-Public Broadcasting System (PBS) Ready to Learn Initiative within the educational media landscape. From an analysis of existing literature and interviews with 25 U.S.

Dramatic Change, Persistent Challenges: A Five-Year View of Children’s Educational Media as Resources for Equity

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9 pp.

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Elevating and Enhancing the “E” in STEM Education

Teaser: 

Catherine McCulloch leads national initiatives focused on bridging STEM research and practice to improve outcomes for students. She is the co-Principal Investigator (co-PI) of Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education (CADRE) and STEM Smart, and project director for EDC’s Interactive STEM R+P Collaboratory team. As co-PI of the Massachusetts Engineering and Innovation Dissemination Community initiative, she recently concluded a landscape analysis of K-12 engineering education in Massachusetts with PI Darryl Williams of Tufts University and EDC colleagues Tracy McMahon and Leslie Goodyear. A new report by the team, Engineering for Every K–12 Student, presents key findings from the study that have important implications not just for Mass. K–20 educators, policymakers, and business and industry leaders, but for all of those who are interested or involved in expanding access to engineering education nationwide. In this post, Catherine reflects on the status of engineering education and shares a few key takeaways from the report.

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A Learner-Centered Design Method for Educational Technology

Tue, 06/10/2014

Author(s): 

Sarita Pillai, Kimberly Lucas, Alice Mello

Since 2003, EDC has implemented projects that work directly with middle school aged youth from underserved populations to develop digital resources aimed at encouraging young people to pursue STEM education and careers. It is through this work that EDC has developed and implemented a powerful, youth-centered participatory research and design method for the design of educational technologies.

Young girls working on computer

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19

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School-age Care and OST: A Conversation about the OST Workforce

In this article, EDC Senior Project Director Tony Streit shares his insights on the unique needs and challenges of the out-of-school time (OST) workforce and describes the mission and work of the EDC-led National Center on Afterschool and Summer Enrichment: "We want to help people to understand the importance of the role of school-age care within the domain of out-of-school time. There doesn’t seem to be an awareness of how child care funding can be used for after-school and summer care, where funds are going and how they support child care services. Some of our goals are to examine strategies to increase access to these services and the use of child care funds for afterschool and summer programs. As well, we want to elevate quality across the board by sharing quality efforts and promising practices where there is innovation and indicators of success. … We are looking for models [nationally] for increasing access and improving quality in a range of settings to have the broadest impact."

Source: 

Youth Today

Publication Date: 

Wed, 06/01/2016

Descriptors (Bodies of Work): 

Early STEM Learning and the Roles of Technologies

Tue, 05/31/2016

Author(s): 

In this EDC white paper, the authors discuss how the thoughtful use of technology by early childhood teachers and families can enhance the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning of children from birth to age eight and help set the stage for successful lifelong STEM learning. The authors summarize key findings from their work and present evidence-based recommendations that can help ensure technology reaches its potential to improve the quality and equity of early STEM education for all young children. Highlights include:

Thoughtful use of technology to support early STEM learning

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Length: 

12 pp.

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Outstanding STEM Learning For All

Teaser: 

Sarita Pillai leads initiatives to improve the quality and equity of STEM education, including managing national research and technical assistance centers, building and sustaining communities of practice to promote professional learning, and engaging youth in developing STEM-focused, technology-based resources. Sarita is the PI of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded STEM Learning and Research (STELAR) Center at EDC and co-PI of the NSF-funded Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL). In 2015, Sarita, STELAR co-PI Caroline Parker, Catherine McCulloch (co-PI of Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education—CADRE at EDC), and colleagues from SRI Education worked with the NSF and White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to coordinate a daylong invitational forum on "next generation" STEM education. In this post, Sarita shares a few key points from EDC’s May 2016 report on the Forum, Next Generation STEM for All: Envisioning Advances Based on NSF Supported Research.

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